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Full text of "My folks the Dixons"

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HAROLD B. LEE LIBRARY 
BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 
PROVO, UTAH 

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MY FOLK 



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MY FOLKS THE DIXONS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

SECTION I 

My Folks the Dixons 1 

Photograph of Henry A. Dixon Op. 2 

Dedicated to Henry A. Dixon 2 

Acknowledgment 3 

Dixon Arms and Crest Op. 5 

Origin of name "DIXON" 5 

Photo of Henry Aldous Dixon Family Op. 6 

"My Folks" (verse) by Rhea Dixon Reeve 7 

Photo of Dixon Boys Op. 8 

SECTION II 

JOHN HENRY DDCON - 1820 Settler to South Africa 

Photo of John Henry Dixon - Taken from a tin type Op. 9 

Specimen of his handwriting and signature Op. 9 

History of John Henry Dixon 9 

Pen sketch of "Settler's Camp" Algoa Bay 1820 Op. 22 

Photo of Port Elizabeth (Algoa Bay) in 1932 Op. 22 

Photo of 1820 Settlers Memorial at Port Elizabeth Op. 22 

Map of the "Zuurveld" locations Op. 24 

Map of Eastern Frontier in 1820 Op. 25 

SECTION III 

REVEREND WILLIAM BOARDMAN 

Specimen of his handwriting and signature Op. 40 

History of the Reverend William Boardman 41 

Pen sketch of 1820 Settlers Landing at Algoa Bay Op. 46 

Pen Sketch of 1820 Settler's Sailing Ship (La Belle Op. 46 
Alliance? ) 

"Drostdy" - Bathurst. First Grammar School Building Op. 50 

Family Register taken from Boardman Bible 54 

SECTION IV 

HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 

Photo of Henry Aldous Dixon Op. 55 

Specimen of his handwriting and signature Op. 55 

Cape of Good Hope Mission History 55 

Conversion to L. D. S. Church 61 

"Testimony of a Pioneer" 63 

Photo of Grahamstown - H. A. Dixon's Birthplace Op. 66 

Photo of St. George Church - Grahamstown Op. 66 

History of Henry Aldous Dixon 67 

iii 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

SECTION IV (Continued) 

HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 

Photo of natives in South Africa 
Photo of some animals of South Africa 
Photo of Tithing Office in Salt Lake City, Utah 
Provo Woolen Mills Photos during fire 
Photo of Dixon Homes in Provo, Utah 
Photo of First Utah County Courthouse in Provo 
Henry A. Dixon's Account of Steamship-Iceberg Collis 
Henry A. Dixon's Patriarchal Blessing 
Death of Henry Aldous Dixon - Newspaper Clipping 
Obituary of Henry Aldous Dixon - Newspaper Clipping 
Photo of Grandma Barrett's Log Cabin 
Photo of Aunt Sarah Barrett Monk 

" An Elm Tree's History"(verse) by Rhea D. Reeve 
Photo of Dixon Elm Tree - 94 years old 
Henry A. Dixon's Will 

Re-newal of Family Ties in South Africa 
Photo of "Cumorah" South African Mission 

Home and Headquarters at Mowbray 
Photos of South African Relatives: Hartmans & Humphris Op99 
Henry A. Dixon's Handwritten Letter to His Sister 

Anne Hartman in Grahamstown, South Africa 99 
Chronological Travels and Important Dates 105 
Map of Africa 110 
South African Mileage Chart 111 

SARAH DE GREY DDCON 

Photo of Sarah DeGrey Dixon Op. 112 
Biography of Sarah DeGrey Dixon 

By Maria Dixon Taylor 113 

Photo of Sarah DeGrey Dixon's Family Op. 8 

Photo of First Provo Third Ward Meeting House Op. 120 

Photo of Provo Tabernacle showing 5 Towers Op. 120 

"Mother" (verse) By Walter D. Dixon 119 

"Memories of Grandma" 121 

Compiled by Sarah Dixon Summerhays 
Photo of Provo Third Ward Chapel & Amusement Hall Op. 124 

Photo of Old Timpanogos School House Op. 126 

Patriarchal Blessing 136 



iv 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 
SECTION IV (Continued) 



Page 



MARY SMITH DIXON 

Photo of Mary Smith Dixon Op. 137 

Biography of Mary Smith Dixon 137 

By Alice Dixon Dangerfield 
Photo of Provo Third Ward Chapel under construction Op. 138 
Short History of Mary Smith Dixon 

By Herself 140 

Photo of Old Provo Tabernacle Tower Op. 140 

Photo of Old and New Tabernacle Op. 140 

MARIA BROOKS DE GREY 

Photo of Maria Brooks DeGrey Op. 141 

Biography of Maria Brooks DeGrey 

By Maria Dixon Taylor 141 

SECTION V 

JOHN DE GREY DDCON 

Photo of John DeGrey Dixon Op. 145 

Photo of Sarah Lewis Dixon Op. 145 
Biography of John DeGrey Dixon 

By Maria Dixon Taylor 145 
"My Folks on Fifth West" 

By Rulon S. Dixon 151 

Family Group Picture Op. 156 

House at 440 North 5th West, Provo Op. 156 

SECTION VI 

ARTHUR DE GREY DIXON 

Photo of Arthur DeGrey Dixon Op. 157 

Photo of Catherine M (Rena) Dixon Op. 157 

Biography of Arthur DeGrey Dixon 

By Arthur Dixon Taylor 157 
Accidental Death of Arthur D. Dixon 

As reported by Deseret Evening News 158 
Photo of house at 275 North 5th West, Provo Op. 158 



v 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

SECTION VII 



Page 



ALICE DIXON DANGERFIELD 

Photo of Alice Dixon Dangerfield Op. 15 9 

Photo of Jabez W. Dangerfield Op. 159 

History of Alice Dixon Dangerfield 159 

Photo of Dangerfield Family Group Op. 162 

SECTION VIII 

SARAH DIXON MC CONACHIE 

Photo of Sarah Dixon McConachie Op. 163 

Photo of Alexander C. McConachie Op. 163 

Sketch of the Life of Sarah Dixon McConachie 

By Nancy McConachie Armstrong 163 
Photo of McConachie House at Main & Apricot St., 

Salt Lake City, Utah Op. 170 

Photo of Donald Collie McConachie Op. 170 

Photo of Nancy McConachie Op. 170 

Group Picture of Fanny Shearsmith and 3 Daughters 

and Sarah D. McConachie Op. 170 

SECTION DC 

MARIA DIXON TAYLOR 

" A Mother's Day Tribute" 

From May 11, 1 941 Sunday Herald 172 

Photo which appeared in this Sunday Herald Op. 172 

Autobiography of Maria Dixon Taylor 173 

Photo of Maria Dixon Taylor Op. 192 

Photo of Arthur N. Taylor Op. 192 
11 A Tribute to Aunt Rye" 

By Rhea D. Reeve ' 193 
" To My Children and Grandchildren" 

A copy of a letter taken from Relief Society Box. 196 

Photo of House at 256 No. 5th West, Provo Op. 196 

A. N. Taylor Family Group Picture Op. 1 96 

Photo of Wildwood Summer Home Op. 1 96 



vi 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

SECTION X 



Page 



WILLIAM ALDOUS DIXON 

Photo of William Aldous Dixon Op. 197 

Photo of "Hattie" Hands Dixon Op. 197 
History of William A. Dixon 

By Vesta Dixon Booth 197 

William A. Dixon Family Group Picture Op. 200 

House at 390 West 2nd North, Provo Op. 200 

SECTION XI 

ERNEST DE GREY DIXON 

Photo of Ernest DeGrey Dixon Op. 201 

Photo of May Painter Dixon Op. 201 
Biography of Ernest D. Dixon 

By Erma D. Boshard & Leah D. Ford 201 

Ernest D. Dixon Family Group Picture Op. 204 

House at 5th North & 8th West, Provo Op. 204 

House at 581 West 4th North, Provo Op. 204 

SECTION XII 

CHARLES OWEN DIXON 

Photo of Charles Owen Dixon Op. 205 

Photo of Virginia Beckstead Dixon Op. 205 
Biography of Charles Owen Dixon 

By His Children 205 

Charles Owen Dixon Family Group Picture Op. 210 

House at 295 North 5th West, Provo Op. 210 

SECTION XIII 

ALBERT FREDERICK DIXON 

Photo of Albert F. Dixon Op. 211 

Photo of Sena Rasmussen Dixon Op. 211 
Biography of Albert F. Dixon 

By Arthur D. Taylor 211 

Albert F. Dixon Family Group Picture Op. 214 

House at 72 North 1st East, Provo Op. 214 



vii 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

SECTION XIV 



Page 



WALTER DE GREY DIXON 

Photo of Walter De Grey Dixon Op. 215 

Photo of "Louie" Maiben Dixon Op. 215 
Biography of Walter D. Dixon 

By Rhea Dixon Reeve 215 

Walter D. Dixon Family Group Picture Op. 228 

House at 232 North 5th West, Provo Op. 228 
" A Tribute to Walter DeGrey Dixon" 

By Rhea Dixon Reeve 229 

SECTION XV 

PARLEY SMITH DIXON 

Photo of Parley Smith Dixon Op. 233 

Photo of "Etta" Dangerfield Dixon Op. 233 

Biography of Parley Smith Dixon 233 

Parley S. Dixon Family Group Picture Op. 236 

House at 191 North 3rd West, Provo Op. 236 

SECTION XVI 

LE ROY DLXON 

Photo of LeRoy Dixon Op. 237 

Photo of Electa Smoot Dixon Op. 237 

LE ROY DIXON 

By Sarah Dixon Summerhays 237 
" Tributes to Le Roy Dixon" 242 
Biographical Sketch of LeRoy Dixon 

Taken from History of Utah Since Statehood 243 
Photos of LeRoy Dixon Family & House -418 No. 5th W. 244 
SECTION XVII 

HARRIET DKON WEST 

Photo of "Hattie" Dixon West Op. 245 

Photo of George Washington West Op. 245 
Harriet Dixon West 

By Vesta Dixon Booth 245 

Photos of West Family Op 246 

Photo of House in San Bernardino, California Qp. 246 

Photo of Hattie & George with Baby Lynn Qp # 246 



viii 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

SECTION XVIII 



Page 



ARNOLD DIXON 

Photo of Arnold Dixon Op. 247 

Photo of May Banks Dixon Op. 247 

Autobiography of Arnold Dixon 247 

Arnold Dixon Family Group Picture Op. 25 

House at 270 North 5th West, Provo Op. 25 

SECTION XIX 

NIELS RASMUSSEN 

Photo of Niels Rasmussen Op. 251 

Biography of Niels Rasmussen 

By Annie Eliza Rasmussen 251 

SARAH BARRETT MONK 

Short Biography 254 

Photo of Sarah Barrett Monk Op. 90 

Photo of Grandma Barrett and Log House Op. 90 

SECTION XX 

DIXON SISTERS CLUB 

Photo of each of the 15 Sisters Op. 255 

Representative Minutes of their Meetings 255 
" The Sister-in-law's Club" 

(Verse) By Rhea Dixon Reeve 257 

SECTION XXI 

DIXON COUSINS 

Dixon Heritage Group "Dixon Cousins Club" 

By Ruth T. Kartchner 261 

"Getting to Know You" a song 25 9 

"Happy Talk" Words by Sarah Summerhays 25 9 

"Third Ward, Sandy Alley'L Dixon Shield and Motto 265 

SECTION XXII 

HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY ROSTER 269 
Explanation of Family Identification Numbers 267 

SECTION XXIII 

INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF HENRY A. DDCON 298 
Including in-laws 

ix 



ILLUSTRATIONS AND PHOTOGRAPHS 

Opposite 
Page 



Henry A. Dixon ^ 

Dixon Coat-of-Arms & Crest 5 

Henry A. Dixon Family o 

Dixon Boys ° 

John Henry Dixon 9 

1820 Settlers' Camp 22 

Algoa Bay - 1932 22 

1820 Settlers' Memorial 22 

Map of "Zuurveld" Locations 24 

Rev. William Boardman's Handwriting 40 

1820 Settlers Landing at Algoa Bay 46 

1820 Settlers' Sailing Ship 46 

"Drostdy" - at Bathurst 50 

Henry Aldous Dixon 55 

Grahamstown 66 

St. George Church - Grahamstown 66 

Natives of South Africa 70 

Wild Animals of South Africa 72 

Tithing Office - Salt Lake City, Utah 76 

Provo Woolen Mills 76 

Provo Woolen Mills on Fire -Second West 78 

Provo Woolen Mills on Fire - First North 78 

Provo Woolen Mills on Fire - Second North 78 

H. A. Dixon Homes - 3rd West & 2nd North 82 

Z. C. M.I. - Provo 82 

First Utah County Courthouse 80 

Second Utah County Courthouse 80 

Old Provo Tabernacle Tower 140 

Old and New Provo Tabernacles 140 

Provo Third Ward Meeting Houses - Old & New 138 

"The Round House" 138 

Grandma Barrett's Log House 90 

"Aunt" Sarah Barrett Monk 90 

The Old Dixon Elm Tree 94 

South African Mission Headquarters - Mowbray 98 

South African Relatives - Hartmans and Humphris 99 
Provo Tabernacle showing 5 Towers 

(Printed from glass negative of Geo. Taylor's) 120 

First Provo Third Ward Meetinghouse 12Q 
Provo Third Ward Chapel, Gymnasium & Rec. Hall 124 

First Timpanogos School House 126 



x 



ILLUST RATIONS 



AND 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

O pposite 
Page 



The Old and New Provo Tabernacles -From West 126 

Sarah DeGrey Dixon 112 

Mary Smith Dixon 137 

Maria Brooks DeGrey 141 

John DeGrey Dixon 145 

Sarah Lewis Dixon 145 

John DeGrey Dixon Family 156 

John D. Dixon's Home 440 No. 5th West 156 

Arthur DeGrey Dixon 157 

Catherine Morgan Dixon 157 

Arthur D. Dixon's Home - 275 No. 5th West 158 

Alice Dixon Dangerfield 159 

Jabez W. Dangerfield 159 

J. W. Dangerfield Family 162 

Sarah Dixon McConachie 163 

Alexander McConachie 163 

McConachie Home - Main & Apricot - Salt Lake 170 

Sarah McConachie, Fanny Shear smith Family \jq 

Donald Collie McConachie 170 

Nancy McConachie 170 

Maria Louise Dixon Taylor 172 

Arthur N. Taylor 192 

A. N. Taylor Home - 256 No. 5th West I96 

A. N. Taylor Summer Home - Wildwood 196 

William Aldous Dixon I97 

Hattie Hands Dixon I97 

William A. Dixon Family 200 

William A. Dixon Home - 4th West & 2nd North 200 

Ernest DeGrey Dixon 201 

May Painter Dixon 201 

Ernest D. Dixon Family 204 

Ernest D. Dixon Home - 5th North & 8th West 204 

Ernest D. Dixon Home - 581 West 4th North 204 

Charles Owen Dixon 205 

Virginia Beckstead Dixon 205 

Charles O. Dixon Family 210 

Charles O. Dixon Home - 295 No. 5th West 210 

Albert Frederick Dixon 211 

Sena Rasmussen Dixon 211 

Albert F. Dixon Family 214 

Albert F. Dixon Home - 72 No. 1st East 214 



xi 



ILLUSTRATIONS AND PHOTOGRAPHS 

Opposite 
Page 



Walter DeGrey Dixon 215 

Louie Maiben Dixon 215 

Walter D. Dixon Family 228 

Walter D. Dixon Home - 232 No. 5th West 228 

Parley Smith Dixon 233 

Etta Dangerfield Dixon 233 

Parley S. Dixon Family 236 

ParleyS. Dixon Home - 191 No. 3rd West 236 

LeRoy Dixon 237 

Electa Smoot Dixon 237 

LeRoy Dixon Family 244 

LeRoy Dixon Home - 418 No. 5th West 244 

Harriet Dixon West 245 

George W. West 245 

George W. West Family 246 

George W. West Home - San Bernardino, Calif. 246 

Hattie West and son Lynn 246 

George W. West and son Lynn 246 

Arnold Dixon 247 

May Banks Dixon 247 

Arnold Dixon Family 250 

Arnold Dixon Home - 270 No. 5th West 250 

Neils Rasmussen 251 

DIXON SISTER'S CLUB: 255 



Sarah L. Dixon 
Maria D. Taylor 
Alice D. Dangerfield 
Electa S. Dixon 
May B. Dixon 
Louie M. Dixon 
Sarah D. McConachie 
Etta D. Dixon 
May P. Dixon 
Hattie H. Dixon 
Sena R. Dixon 
Rena M. Dixon 
Fanny S. Whimpey 
Sophia S. Manson 
Virginia B. Dixon 



Map of Eastern Frontier, South Africa - 1820 25 

Outline Map of Africa 110 
"Third Ward - Sandy Alley"- Dixon Shield 

And Motto 265 



xii 



MY FOLKS, THE DIXONS 

Their Births 
Their Marriages 
Their Children 
Their Death 

THEIR HISTORY 

My Name 
My Heritage 
My Guide 
My Goal 

My Responsibility 
My Future 

MY FOLKS, THE DIXONS 



Volume One 



Second Printing 
19 7 8 



This Volume is Dedicated to the Memory of 

HENRY A. DIXON 

Who accepted the truth of the Everlasting 
Gospel in the land of his birth, the Cape of 
Good Hope Colony, South Africa; migrated 
to Utah in 1856; passed on at the early age 
of forty nine years, in 1884; who left a family 
of sixteen children, who have perpetuated 
the Friendly and Trusted name of DIXON 
throughout the land. 



-ACKNOWLEDGEMENT AND APPRECIATION: 

I wish to thank the whole DIXON FAMILY for their interest, 
their co-operation, and their help in supplying the materials con- 
tained in this book. 

It would require pages to itemize those who have been most 
helpful in compiling this volume. To avoid the inevitable of un- 
intentionally omitting someone from a list, I am simply saying 
to all, "THANK YOU FOR MAKING THIS BOOK MATERIALIZE. " 

CLARENCE DIXON TAYLOR 
1969 
Provo, Utah 



DIXON 



ARMS - Argent on a cross between four lozenges 
sable an eagle displayed of the field. 

CREST - A dexter hand proper holding a sword 
bend sinister ways argent. 

MOTTO - "Fortes fortuna juvat" . ( Fortune assists the brave) 

The name DIXON is variously spelled in old Scottish records 
Decksoune, Dykysoun, Dicson, Dixon, and in a list of prisoners 
taken at the battle of Solway Moss, it appears as Dicksame. The 
Chiefs of clan Dickson are descended from the Keiths, Earls 
Marshall of Scotland. It is recounted that the Keiths could journey 
from North to South of Scotland and find shelter every night in one 
of their own castles. The first Dixon on record was a grandson of 
the Earl Marshall, and a clansman of the Douglas. Two ancient 
Scottish historians, Archdeacon Barbour, who wrote in 1375, and 
Blind Harry, the minstrel, whose metrical history was written 
about 1381, recount his triumphs. According to the minstrel, when 
Douglas wished to recover his castle at Sanquhar, in 1295, he 
selected Thorn Dycson, who was a clansman, to pass through the 
enemy's camp of three thousand men bearing a message to Sir 
William Wallace. 

"Thorn Dycson then was met with good Wallace 
Quhilk grantyt sone to re skew Douglace 
Dicson he said wait (know) throw them mulitipi 
Three thousand men their pwer mycht nocht be. " 
For this service, Thomas Dickson was awarded the land of 
Hisle side or Haslcside or Hazerside, County Lanark. In a charter 
of 13 06 from King Robert Bruce to Thomas Dickson, Filius Ricardi, 
the charter is endorsed "Carta Thome fil. Dick". In gratitude for 
for his services King Robert Bruce granted him the Barony of 
Symunstun, now Symington, in the County of Lanark, and also created 
him Her editary Castellan of Douglas Castle. 

Dickson is now the usual form in Scotland, but in England, where 
the name is not a clan name, it is written Dixon. 

THE FAMILY IN EUROPE 
Thomas Dickson, the first to write his name Dixon, was born 
November 6, 1739, in Dunblane, Perthshire, Scotland, son of Henry 
Dickson, Esquire. He left Scotland about 1763, lived for some years 
in Westminster, and in 1786, removed with his family to Ostend. 

Taken from NEWBOLD P. 258 



5 



MY FOLKS 
THE HENRI ALDOUS DIXON FAMILY 



j 



I inii 




Left to Right 

Top Row - Parley S., William A., Sarah, Ernest D., 

Charles 0., Walter D. , LeRoy. 
Middle - Alice, Mary Smith, Sarah DeGrey, 

John D., Arthur D. 
Bottom - Albert F., Harriet, Maria, Arnold. 

Picture on Wall - Henry A. Dixon 



MY FOLKS 



Dedicated to the posterity of HENRY ALDOUS, SARAH 
DE GREY and MARY SMITH DIXON 

It has always been my priviledge 

to have real folks around 

For I was born among them, 

None better can be found. 

Some folks boast of famed Ancestors 

Who first settled this wonderful land. 

Others have titles and wealth 

Live in mansions - costly and grand. 

I boast of a birth- right from sturdy pioneers, 

Whose courage surmounted all hardships and fears. 

They did not endow me 

With titles or gold, 

But with virtues and values 

That aren't bought and sold. 

I cherish my heritage, 

I'm proud of my kin, 

I have no regrets of what might have been. 

For I will not covet 

The spoils of this land, 

As long as I can be with folks 

Who love and understand. 

It must be very lonely 

When your folks are far away, 

To never know their he art- aches, 

And what they do and say. 

Or meet with them and clasp their hands 

And pass the time of day, 

Oh, I'm so very fortunate 

To have folks steadfast and true, 

Who appreciate understanding each other - - - 

The way you folks all do. 

It is said, "We can choose our friends, 
But our relatives we have to take" 
I'm very glad to claim you folks 
I'll never you forsake. 
It's such a satisfaction 

To have brothers, sisters, uncles, aunts, 



7 



MY FOLKS (Con't. ) 



Who are very choice among people, 
With personalities that enhance. 
I hope we will stay united 
Together share joys and tears, 
With courage of Pioneer kin 
Carry on! through-out the years. 
May we, following their example 
Love God and fellow man 
Be prayerful and obedient, 
Doin all the good we can. 



RHEA DIXON REEVE 



8 



DIXON BOYS 




Left to Right 

Albert F., Arthur D. , Parley S., John D. , 
Le Roy, ?n'alter D., Charles 0., Arnold, 
William A., Ernest D. 



SARAH DE GREY DIXON FAMILY 




Left to Right 

Back Row - Charles 0., Maria, Walter D. 

Front Row - Le Roy, Arthur D., Ernest D. , 
SARAH, John D., Arnold. 



London, England 



JOHN HENHY DIXON 
1820 Settler to South Africa 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



1820 Settler To South Africa 



John Henry Dixon was born May 28, 1786 at West Ham, Essex 
County, near London, England. He was the son of Thomas Dixon and 
Sarah (Elizabeth) Dixon. He had the following brothers and sisters who 
were all christened in the old Parish Church in West Ham, Essex 
County, England: 



Thomas John Dixon Christened Oct. 29, 1780 

Richard Dixon " June 22, 1783 

Joseph Dixon 11 June 29, 1785 

Mary Ann Dixon " July 31, 1791 

Charles Dixon " Mar 16, 1796 



The period in which John Henry was born seemed symbolic of 
his later course in life. It was a period of revolution and change. 
At this time Britain officially recognized the complete independence 
of the United States at the signing of the Peace Treaty in Paris in 
1783. And in the year 1787 the Constitution of the United States was 
inspired and framed in its broad form. In England, the industrial rev- 
olution was just commencing; for in Nottingham in 1785 a cotton mill 
had just installed the first steam engine to drive its machinery. In 
July of 178 9 the French Revolution began by the storming of the Bast- 
ille in Paris. 

John Henry Dixon married Margaret Waldon , who gave birth to 
the following girls while still living in England: 



Mary Born in 1811 

Emma " 1814 - Married Charles P. Webber 

Eliza " 1816 11 Sargent 

Sarah » 1818 " Atkins 

Their only son, William Henry Dixon, was born November 24, 
18 21 in South Africa, and was later married to Emily Emberton An- 
derson. 

Early in the 19th century, Great Britain was experiencing an ad- 
justment period, both socially and economically, with a shift of the 
industrial population from their work in the cottage industries to the 
large factories located in the towns and villages. This fast and uncon- 
trolled growth of the towns resulted in inadequate , filty and sub- stan- 
dard living conditions for the workers, which in turn caused much dis- 
satisfaction amongst the workers and their families. 

The return of 300,000 soldiers from the victorious Napoleonic 
War in 1815, all seeking their former postions, and the termination 



9 



10 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



of all war contracts and subsidies, which resulted in further unem- 
ployment; as well as the crop failures on the farms - all contributed 
to the general prospects of a major depression. 

With such a a dismal economic picture, it is understandable 
that many persons, including John Henry Dixon, began to think and 
investigate into the possibilities of emigrating to a new land. For sev- 
eral years, America had been a land of opportunity and a great 
many people all over Europe had gone to the United States Colonies to 
make their living as well as a home for their families. 

With the loss of the United States Colonies in 1783, the British 
Government was against opening up new colonies and encouraged ex- 
pansion of the existing colonies in Canada, Australia, India, or the 
newly acquired Cape of Good Hope. 

Up to 1819 the British Government looked upon emigration as a 
drain on its manpower and wealth, rather than a cure for its domestic 
problems. Inquiries received for information on emigration, were 
never answered or curt, discouraging or even dis- respectful answers 
were given in reply. Requests for Government aid in settling newly 
acquired territory was bluntly refused. 

Grahamstown (birthplace of Henry Aldous Dixon) in the year 1819 
was the chief military center of all the Cape frontier in South Africa. 
In April 1819, 1 0, 000 Kaffirs in broad day-light, made an attack on 
Grahamstown. With a garrison of only 400 British Soldiers, they 
were very fortunate in driving the native invaders out of the Cape Col- 
ony, back to Kaffirland. Just how long the British Soldiers were going 
to be able to hold the natives in their restrictive area, was a .most 
vexing and doubtful problem. To maintain more troops and strengthen 
military posts was going to be a very costly operation for the British 
Government. 

The Cape of Good Hope was very important to the British Govern- 
ment as a "half way house" between England and India. All vessels 
going to the Far East or around the Cape stopped long enough to re- 
plenish their supplies and fill their tanks with fresh water. Here a 
naval base was maintained for the protection of Britain's vast fleet 
of merchant and naval vessels. 

In order to further protect the Cape of Good Hope from the native 
invaders and to retain it for its geographic location, a less costly plan 
than garrisoning a large troop of soldiers here, was presented by the 
Governor of the Cape, Lord Charles Somerset. He recommended to 
the British Parliament that they appropriate 50,000 pounds($250, 000) 
for the colonization of the unoccupied Zuurveld with 4, 000 British 
Subjects. (Although the Settlers were unaware of it, the real 
"purpose of this plan for a new settlement, was to establish a 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



11 



sturdy and reliable human buffer between the war- like Kaffir tribes 
on the east, and the European Colony on the Western perimeter of 
the area". 

The people of Great Britain took to this colonization plan with 
great enthusiasm. Literature and public meetings were presented in 
all parts of the Country. 

John Henry Dixon in the year 1819, was a very industrious and 
enterprising man of 32 years. He was following his chosen profession 
of a joiner (specialized carpenter). At this time he was living at No. 
8 Mutton Road Lane, Mile End Road, London, England, with his wife 
Margaret and four young daughters. After having obtained some of 
these Government pamphlets publicizing the free land of South Africa, 
he attended one of the meetings being held near his home. Thus the 
spirit of his day - - -for freedom - - -for wealth - - - to contribute 
to the growth of a new country - - - and a change for a better way of 
life, presented itself in these Government announcements of free land, 
it offered a future life of wealth and ease at the Cape of Good Hope. 

Not having received sufficient details of the plan at the meeting, 
John Henry requested additional detailed information regarding em- 
migration to the Cape of Good Hope when he applied to the Colonial 
Office at Downing Street, London. The following circular was sent 
to him: 

Downing Street, London, 1819 
" I have to acquaint you in reply to your letter of the that the 

following are the conditions under which it is proposed to give encour- 
agement to emigration to the Cape of Good Hope. 11 

"The sufferings to which many individuals have been exposed who 
have emigrated to His Majesty's Foreign Possessions, unconnected 
and unprovided with any capital, or even the means of support, having 
been very afflicting to themselves, and equally burdensome to the 
Colonies to which they have proceeded, the Government has determ- 
ined to confine the applications of the money most recently voted by 
Address in the House of Commons, to those persons who, possessing 
the means, will engage to carry out at least ten able-bodied individ- 
uals above eighteen years of age, with or without families, the Govern- 
ment always reserving to itself the right of selecting from the several 
offers made to them those who may prove, upon examination, to be 
most eligible. " 

"In order to give some security to the Government that the person 
undertaking to make these establishments , have the means of doing so, 
every person engaging to take out the above mentioned number of 
persons or families, shall deposit at the rate of ten pounds (To be re- 
paid as here-in-after mentioned) for every family so taken out, prov- 



12 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



ided that the family does not consist of more than one man, one wo- 
man and two children under fourteen years of age. All children above 
the number of two will have to be paid for, in addition to the deposits 
above mentioned, in the proportion of Five Pounds for every two child- 
ren under fourteen years of age, and Five Pounds for every person 
between the ages of fourteen and eighteen. " 

" In consideration of this deposit a passage shall be provided at 
the expense of Government for the Settlers, who shall also be vicual- 
led from the time of their Embarkation until the time of their landing 
in the Colony. 11 

" A grant of land under the conditions hereafter specified, shall 
be made to him at the rate of One Hundred Acres for every such Per- 
son or Family whom he so takes out; one third of the sum advanced to 
Governments on the outset, shall be repaid on landing, when the vicual- 
ling at the expense of Government shall cease. A further proportion 
of one third shall be repaid as soon as it shall be certified to the Gov- 
ernor of the Colony that the Settlers, under the direction of the Person 
taking them out, are actually located upon the Land assigned to them, 
and the remainder at the expiration of three months from the date of 
their location. " 

" If any Parishes in which there may be redundancy of population 
shall unite in the selection of an intelligent individual to proceed to the 
Cape, with Settlers under his direction, not less in number and of the 
description above mentioned, and shall advance money in the propor- 
tion above mentioned, the Government will grant land to such an ind- 
ividual at the rate of One hundred Acres for every head of a Family, 
leaving the Parish at liberty to make such conditions with the Individ- 
ual, or the Settler, as may be calculated to prevent the Parish becom- 
ing again chargeable with the maintenance of such Settlers, in the 
event of their returning to this Country. " 

" But no offers of this kind will be accepted, unless it shall be 
clear that the Persons proposing to become Settlers have distincly 
given their consent, and the head of each Family is not infirm or in- 
capable of work. " 

" It is further proposed that in any case in which One Hundred 
Families proceed and apply for leave to carry out with them a Minis- 
ter of their own persuasion, Government will, upon their being actual- 
ly located, assign a salary to the Minister whom they may have select- 
ed to accompany them, if he shall be approved by the Secretary of 
State. " 

11 The lands will be granted at a quit rent to be fixed, which rent, 
however, will be remitted for the first Ten Years; and at the expira- 
tion of Three Years (during which the party and a number of families, 
in the proportion of one for every Hundred Acres, must have resided 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



13 



on the estate), the land shall be measured at the expense of Government, 
and the holder shall obtain, without fee, his title thereto, on a perpet - 
ual quit rent, not exceeding in any case Two Pounds Sterling for every 
One Hundred Acres; subject, however, to this clause beyond the usual 
reservations, that the land shall become forfeited to Government, in 
the case the Party shall abandon the estate, or not bring it into culti- 
vation within a given number of years. " 

11 P.S. In order to ensure the arrival of the Settlers at the Cape at 
the beginning of the planting season, the Transports will not leave this 
Country until the month of November. " 

" The usual reservations are the right of the Crown to Mines of 
Precious Stones, of Gold and Silver, and to make such roads as May 
be necessary for the convenience of the Colony." 

Other details subsequently furnished but not mentioned in the 
original (first) Government Circular were as follows: 

" Agricultural implements, seed and other essential requirements 
were to be supplied at prime cost when the Settlers landed, and rations 
(also at prime cost) were to be issued until the first harvest had been 
reaped. The total assistance from the Government, therefore, con- 
sisted of a free passage, a grant of land, a remission of the quit- rent 
thereon for the first ten years; otherwise the Settlers were expected 
to fend for themselves from the moment they landed, except that tents 
were to be loaned to the Settlers until such time as they were able to 
build themselves more permanent homes. 

Most specific instructions were issued that no Settler should be 
allowed to own slaves or even hire native labor, and that all work on 
the lands alloted was to be performed by free white labor, any contra- 
vention of these stipulations rendering the lands liable to instant for- 
fe iture . 

"If more than one-fifth of the Settlers in a party abandoned their 
location, the Government reserved the right to resume possession of 
the land. " 

Although the Government reserved the right to make the final sel- 
ection of the Settlers, the "Heads of the Parties" were allowed to 
make what arrangements they pleased with the persons they desired 
to accompany them which fell into one of the following classifications: 

1. The Independent Settlers . 

These persons banded together in a Party, with one of their 
member appointed as Party Head. They paid their own deposit money 
and were to receive their One Hundred Acres of land. 

2. The Sole Proprietor. 

The Party Head, a man of considerable wealth, assumed all 
financial responsibilities of his members. Having paid their deposit 
money, the members indentured themselves to him as a servant for 



14 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



a specified number of years, and generally waived all rights to the 
One Hundred Acres of land, in favor of the Party Head. 

3. The individuals who emigrated at their own expense , belonging 
to no particular group, paying their own expenses and receiving noth- 
ing more from the Government than the One Hundred Acres of land. 

Not belonging to the wealthy class, John Henry Dixon sought out 
eleven of his friends and their families and volunteered to act as their 
Party Head in making arrangements with the Government. Each con- 
tributed their own deposit money, and each received their own One 
Hundred Acres of land in the Cape of Good Hope Settlement. 

Those subscribing to the Dixon Party were: 



NAME 



AGE 



James Carney 
Elizabeth 



28 
29 



Elizabeth 



3 Months 



Joseph Daniel 
Elizabeth 



36 
35 
7 



Richard 



John Henry Dixon 
Margaret 



32 
36 
9 
6 
4 
2 



Mary 
Emma 
Eliza 
Sarah 



Henry Fuller 
Susannah 



25 
23 
4 



George 
Charle s 




Robert Herman 
Mary Ann 



34 
36 
7 
2 



Mary Ann 
Eliza 



George Marsden 
Elizabeth 

Elizabeth 



40 
34 
8 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



15 



NAME 



AGE 



Jesse Paxton 
Sarah 



Eliza 

David 

George 

Henry 

William 

Charle s 



39 
39 
4 
2 
7 
5 
13 
11 



James Vice 
Sophia 



John 
James 



24 
30 
8 

3 



John Vice 
Elizabeth 



Elizabeth 
Ann 



30 
28 
2 

3 Months 



Richard Webb 
Elizabeth 

Edward 
Richard 



29 
22 
2 

3 Months 



John Wyatt 
Jane 



Jane 

Ann Mary 

Amelia 

John 



31 
34 
7 
3 
4 
2 



John Henry, having raised the 130 pounds sterling as the de- 
posit required, immediately made application to the Colonial Of- 
fice for permission to proceed as a Settler to the Cape of Good Hope. 
His application was accepted and he was notified to have his Party on 
board the sailing ve ssel, "Ocean" , anchored at Depthford, London, the 
latter part of November. The following letter was sent from London, 
England to Lord Charles Somerset, who was the Government Agent 
and representative of the Crown, in the new Colony: 



16 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



Downing Street, London 
9 November 1819 

My Lord 

I am directed by Earl Bathurst to transmit herewith to your Lord- 
ship a return of persons proceeding to the Cape of Good Hope under 
the direction of Mr. J. H. Dixon to settle in the Colony under the re- 
gulations which have been promulgated by His Majesty's Government, 
and I am directed to desire that your Lordship will cause a portion of 
land to be alloted to Mr. Dixon in conformity to these regulations. 

Mr. Dixon has deposited the sum of 130 pounds as specified in 
the Return; and I have to request that your Lordship will issue your 
warrant to the office of the Commissoriat Dept. at the Cape for the 
repayment to Mr. Dixon, of the amount of his deposit money in pro- 
portions, and in the periods stated in the regulations. 

I have the honor to be 
My Lord your Lordships 
most obedient humble servant 

HENRY GORDSTRUM 



Gene ral 

Honorable 
The Right 

The Lord Charles Somerset 

Return of Settlers proceeding to the Cape of Good Hope, under 
the direction of John Henry Dixon, 8 Mutton Road Lane , Mile End 
Road, London, England. 

Total No. of Men 1 1 

Total No. of Women 11 
Children under 14 Yr. 27 
Whole Party 49 
NAME AGE PROFESSION PARTY SHIP LIST 



John Henry Dixon 32 

Margaret Waldon 36 

Mary 9 

Emma 6 

Eliza 4 

Sarah 2 



Joine r 
Party Leader 



Dixon Ocean 



47 



(Copied from 1820 Settlers 
(manuscript C. O. 1878), Archives 
Capetown, Union of South Africa 
By Clarence D. Taylor, Jan. 23,1933) 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



17 



The winter of 1819 had been the most severe weather around 
London, in forty years. The thermometer had continually regist- 
ered several degrees below freezing temperature. This freezing te- 
mperature mixed with piercing artic winds and heavy snowstorms 
had delayed the departure schedule of the Settler's ships. The 
freezing ice on the Thames River had imprisoned the eight, three- 
masted, 400-5 00 ton sailing vessels, which were all loaded with pass- 
engers, baggage and supplies , ready to depart for the Cape of Good Hope . 

January 6, 1820, the ship, Ocean, with Capt. Davis at the helm; 
the Settler Parties under the direction of J. H. Dixon, composed of 
48 persons from London; E. Damant, numbering 57 persons from 
Norfolk; W. Howard, numbering 60 persons from Buckinghamshire; 
and Dr. N. Morgan, with 41 persons from London; a total of 206 
Settlers, plus the crew, was able to free itself from the ice choked 
mooring at Depthford and proceed as far as Portsmouth. Here it en- 
countered one of those treacherous "January Gales", which tore the 
ship "Ocean" from its moorings and caused it to collide with the Settler 
Ship "Northampton" which was taking on passengers at Portsmouth. 
Both ships were somewhat damaged, but not sufficient to further de- 
lay their departure from Portsmouth. 

Whole tiers of vessels had been driven by this gale, from their 
moorings, and were drifting in the darkness down the Thames River. 
Several ships along the South Coast had to put in for shelter and food 
at the nearby ports, in consequence of this big "blow". 

The Settler Ship "Sir George Osborn" was grounded by this gale, 
near and opposite the Greenwich Hospital, and was refloated with 
difficulty. The "Nautilus" was blown onto the dangerous Goodwin 
Sands and grounded for some time. It was finally re-floated into 
deeper water and was able to continue its course. 

Finally, the Ship "Ocean" was able to reach open water where the 
sea was running high and there was plenty of room to maneuver 
and proceed southward. In the shallow Bay of Biscay the weather was 
tempestous, but after that milder weather conditions prevailed. With 
the warm, sunny weather and a calm sea, the Settlers on the "Ocean" 
took on a new life and began to talk, think and make plans for their 
new home and new way of life in the Cape of Good Hope. 

Amid these calm and peaceful days came a most appalling exper- 
ience to the passengers of the ship "Ocean" as the ship was lying in 
anchor at Porto Prayo, one of the Cape de Verd Islands. 

"In the dead of night, her passengers were rudely awakened from 
their repose by the loud booming of a cannon, and by the tearing thro- 
ugh of the rigging, by a cannon ball from one of the batteries on shore. 
The excitement, consequent upon this act of hostility towards the ship, 
lying as it was in a friendly port.was as may be imagined, very con- 



18 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



siderable; but while the affrighted emigrants were conjecturing as to 
the cause of it, a second discharge followed, the ball this time strik- 
ing the ship with such force that it was feared the masts would go by 
the board. The excitement and consternation were intense. But yet 
another ball was sent hissing towards the apparently doomed vessel, 
this time falling short, and diving into the sea with a noise resembl- 
ing the plunge of a redhot shot. The shot which had struck the vessel 
was a nine pounder, and entered the storeroom only three feet below 
the floor of Mr. Howard's cabin. A hostile schooner, it was after- 
wards explained, had visited and fired upon the Port a few weeks pre- 
viously. A schooner simiarly rigged had entered the harbor with the 
"Ocean 11 , and sentinels at the batteries were ordered to keep close 
watch of her. A boat, it was thought from the schooner, was seen 
approaching the shore, and fearing hostile intentions, the shots which 
had so nearly wrecked the "Ocean" had been fired at it, with the re- 
sults stated. 11 (From T. Sheffield, Story of the Settlement) 

The "Ocean" passed near the island of Madera, and since the day 
was so clear, the Settlers could see the top of Teneriffe Peak in the 
Canary Island Group, long before any other land became visible. The 
white, snow covered peaks rises 12,152 feet above the sea level. 

At Jago, which is just about half the distance from London to 
Capetown, a stop of several days was made. Here it was possible to 
buy or trade old clothes for fresh fruit such as oranges, bananas, 
cocoanuts. One of the young men traded an old coat for 200 oranges, 
a fine goat and kid, and 12 cocoanuts. He bought a sheep for a dollar 
and a 14 pound turkey for a pair of shoes. Sheep and cattle were pur- 
chased here by the Captain of the vessel to supply a source of fresh 
meat for the remainder of the journey. Having no way of refrigera- 
tion for foods, the cattle, sheep and poultry were brought aboard alive 
and were fed and taken care of until needed for food, then they were 
butchered and consumed . 

The ship "Ocean" was very fortunate to have two medical doctors 
aboard. They provided the best medical care possible under the cir - 
cumstances in keeping the 206 persons plus the crew in good physical 
condition. Doctor Nathanial Morgan, was head of the Morgan Party 
which consisted of 41 persons all from London. He became a 
very close friend of J. H. Dixon and wife . The other doctor, John 
Atherstone, a member of the Damants 1 Party, later received much 
publicity because of his recognition of the first diamond at the fabul- 
ous Kimberly diamond mine. 

April 15, 1820, after traveling between 6, 000 and 7, 000 miles, 
the vessel "Ocean" dropped anchor alongside other Settler Ships in 
Algoa Bay - - - the end of the long sea voyage. 

Much to the disappointment of the Settlers, the ship had dropped 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



19 



anchor at Table Bay (Capetown). Passengers were not permitted to 
leave the ship. After spending about ten days replenishing provisions 
and fresh water, they had continued their journey around the southern 
tip of the African Continent to their destination - Algoa Bay. 

Mr. Thomas Pringle, the leader of the Scottish Party who arr- 
ived at Algoa Bay aboard the ship "Brilliant", a few days later than 
the ship "Ocean" describes his journey along the Southern shore of 
Africa and the landing at Algoa Bay in his "Narrative of a Residence 
in South Africa" : 

"We sailed out of Simon's Bay on the 10th of May with a brisk gale 
from the N. W. , which carried us around Cape L'Aguillas, at the rate 
of nearly ten knots an hour. On the 12th, at day-break, however, we 
found ourselves almost be calmed, opposite the entrance to the Knysna, 
a fine lagoon, or salt-water lake, which forms a beautiful and spacious 
haven, though unfortunately of rather difficult access, winding up, as 
we were informed by our Captain, who had twice entered it with the 
"Brilliant", into the very bosom of the magnificient forests which 
covers this part of the coast. During this and the two following days, 
having scarcely any wind, and the little we had being adverse, we 
kept tacking off and on within a few miles of the shore. This gave us 
an excellent opportunity of surveying the coast scenery of Auteniqua- 
land and Zitzikama, which is of a very striking character. The land 
rises abruptly from the shore in massive mountain ridges, clothed 
with forests of large timber, and swelling in the back-ground into 
lofty serrated peaks of naked rock. As we passed headland after 
headland, the sylvan recesses of the bays and mountain opened succes- 
sively to our gaze, like a magnificient panorama, continually unfold- 
ing new features or exhibiting new combinations of scenery, in which 
the soft and stupendous, the monotonous and the picturesque, were 
strangely blended. The aspect of the whole was impressive, but som- 
bre; beautiful, but somewhat savage. There was the grandeur and the 
grace of nature, majestic and untamed; and there was likewise that 
air of lone some ness and dreary wildness which a country unmarked 
by the traces of human industry or of human residence seldom fails 
to exhibit to the view of civilized man. Seated on the poop of the ves- 
sel, I gazed alternately on that solitary shore, and on the bands of 
emigrants who now crowded the deck or learned along the gangway; 
some silently musing, like myself, on the scene before us; others 
conversing in scattered groups, and pointing with eager gestures to 
the country they had come so far to inhabit. Sick of the wearisome 
monotony of a long sea voyage (for only a few had been permitted by 
the Cape authorities to land at Simon's Bay), all were exhilarated by 
the prospect of speedily disembarking; but the sublimely stern aspect 
of the country so different from the rich tameness of ordinary English 



20 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



scenery, seemed to strike many of the Southron with a degree of awe 
approaching to consternation. The Scotch, on the contrary, as the 
recollections of their native land were vividly called up by the rugged 
peaks and shaggy declivities of this wild coast, were strongly affect- 
ed, like all true mountaineers on such occasions. Some were excited 
to extravagant spirits; others silently shed tears. 

Coasting on in this manner, we at length doubled Cape Recife on 
the 15th, and late in the afternoon came to an anchor in Algoa Bay, in 
the midst of a little fleet of vessels, which had just landed, or were 
engaged in landing, their respective bands of settlers. The "Menai" 
sloop of war and the "Weymouth" storeship were moored beside the 
transports and their crews , together with a party of military on shore, 
were employed in assisting the debarkation. 

It was an animated and interesting scene. Around us in the west 
corner of the spacious bay, were anchored ten or twelve large vessels, 
which had recently arrived with emigrants, of whom a great propor- 
tion were still on board. Directly in front, on a rising ground a few 
hundred yards from the beach, stood the little fortified barrack, or 
blockhouse, called Fort Frederick, occupied by a division of the 72nd 
Regiment, with the tents and marquees of the officers pitched on the 
heights around it. At the foot of these heights, nearer the beach, 
stood three thatched cottages and one or two wooden houses brought 
from England, which now formed the offices of the commissaries and 
other civil functionaries appointed to transact the business of emigra- 
tion, and to provide the settlers with provisions and other stores, and 
with carriages (ox wagons) for their conveyance up the country. Inter- 
spersed among these offices, and among the pavillions of the function- 
aries and navel officers employed on shore, were scattered large 
depots of agricultural implements , carpenters 1 and blacksmiths 'tools , 
and iron ware of all descriptions, sent out by the home Government to 
be furnished to the settlers at prime cost. About two furlongs to the 
eastward, on a level spot between the sanhills on the beach and the 
stony heights beyond, lay the camp of the emigrants. Nearly a thou- 
sand souls, on an average, were at present lodged there in military 
tents; but parties were daily moving off in long trains of bullock wag- 
ons, to proceed to their appointed places of location in the interior, 
while their place was immediately occupied by fresh bands, hourly 
disembarking from the vessels in the bay. A suitable background to 
this animated picture, as viewed by us from the anchorage, was sup- 
plied by the heights over the river Zwartkops, covered with a dense 
jungle , and by the picturesque peaks of the Winterhoek and the dark 
masses of the Zureberg ridge far to the northward, distinctly outlined 
in the clear blue sky. 

The whole scene was such as could not fail to impress deeply the 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



21 



most unconcerned spectator. To us, who had embarked all our world- 
ly property and earthly prospects, our own future, fortunes and the 
fate of our posterity, in this enterprise, it was interesting and excit- 
ing to an intense degree. 

It being too late to go ashore that evening, we continued gazing on 
this scene till long after sunset - - - till twilight had darkened into 
night, and the constellation of the southern hemisphere, revolving 
in cloudless brilliancy above, reminded us that nearly half the globe's 
expanse intervened between us and our native land - - - the homes of 
our youth and the friends we had parted from for ever; and that here, 
in this farthest nook of Southern Africa, we were now about to receive 
the portion of our inhe ritance ,and to draw an irrevocable lot for our- 
selves and for our children's children. Solemn reflections will press 
themselves at such a time on the most thoughtless; and this night, as 
we swung at anchor in Algoa Bay, so long the bourne of all our wish- 
es, many a wakeful brain among us was doubtless expatiating, each 
according to the prevailing current of thought, in serious meditation 
on the future or the past. A long sea voyage, and, far more, one 
with such an object as we had before us, totally disconnecting us for 
a time from the bustling world behind and before, and from the great 
political and social interest of humanity, appears, as it were, like a 
pause or interlude between the acts of the busy drama of human life, 
and deepens the interest both of the past and the future by affording a 
convenient space for reflection. This quiet interval was about to 
close with us; and we now waited with anxiety for the curtain to draw 
up, and unfold in all the distinctness of reality the scenes of novelty 
and adventure to which we had so long looked forward. " 

To-day at the site of the landing of these 1820 Settlers has been 
erected a tall, square, red-brick Campanile; to honor and memorial- 
ize these 1820 Pioneers. Modern man has constructed a man made 
harbor by projecting a huge concrete block breakwater out into the 
bay and which now affords protection to the smaller vessels who can 
unload their cargoes on the jetty in comparative safety. 

The ship "Ocean" and all other Settler Ships were required to 
anchor in the open bay and the unloading of the passengers and their 
belongings was entrusted to the sailors of the British Government 
Ship HMS "Menai", the soldiers of the 72nd Regiment and the 21st 
Light Dragoons who were then stationed at Fort Frederick, on the 
heights overlooking the Bay. 

The day following their arrival at Algoa Bay, April 16, 1820, 
John Henry Dixon and family together with all of their belongings 
were loaded into a large flat bottomed boat which the sailors had tied 
alongside the ship "Ocean". These flat bottomed boats were then 
loaded and worked in towards shore with the aid of guide lines 



22 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



and through the surf to the sandy beaches. Here John Henry, the other 
able bodied men and the grown boys, waded through the surf. 
The four Dixon girls and their mother were carried to dry land by the 
soldiers. Some of the older men hired colored servants to carry 
them ashore. All the cargo was carried to dry land by the soldiers 
and colored servants. 

Upon reaching shore the Dixon Family and their Party were as- 
signed use of some of the Government tents in "Settlers' Town". They 
had just been vacated by other Settler families upon their departure 
for the Zuurveld; by Captain Frances Evatt, Government Resident at 
Algoa Bay and Commander of Fort Frederick. All their possessions 
were gathered from the beach and carried to the assigned tent which 
was to be their home until an available wagon and ox team was provid- 
ed for the transportation of their belongings and themselves up-coun- 
try to their new location. 

Immediately upon getting settled in "Settlers' Town", (the 1500 
person tent town provided by the Government) John Henry applied to 
the Government officials for the 1/3 deposit money he and his Party 
had paid in London, England before sailing. This money was to buy 
their seed, farm implements, equipment and the necessary food 
until they could raise their own crops. The Government had made 
all of these articles available to the Settlers at cost. Upon learning 
from the Government officials that the Settlers were to pay their own 
transportation to their inland location, John Henry and eleven of the 
Party Leaders became quite upset. 

To lighten the immediate financial burden, the 1/3 deposit money 
was paid and the transportation cost for the wagons and the Govern- 
ment purchases were charged against the remainder of the deposit 
money. 

About 200 ox teams and wagons had been hired by the Government 
from the Dutch farmers in the vicinity of Graaff-Reinett area, to prov- 
ide the transportation of the Settlers from "Settlers' Town" to the new 
location. It had by then been surveyed and staked out by the Gov- 
ernment surveyors. For the next several months the ox teams and 
wagons, together with their Dutch drivers and native servants, shut- 
tled the Settlers from Algoa Bay to the Albany District locations. 

At last the day arrived when a little native, colored boy led his 
long horned oxen and the big clumsy wagon to the Dixon tent. All the 
Dixon belongings, including all the baggage they had brought from 
England on the boat, together with picks, spades, axes, harnesses, 
ploughs and harrows, seed and supplies, which had been obtained from 
Government stores at cost, were loaded into the wagons along with the 
four girls and their mother and father. Then with the crack of 
the big bull whips and the shouts of the Dutch drivers, the oxen slowly 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



23 



headed "up country", to the land of Hope (but what actually became a 
land of despair). 

Traveling north they crossed the Zwartkops River where they 
made their camp that first night. What a contrast to their former way 
of living. They had been born and raised in the big city of London 
with all its comforts and conveniences and now to be cooking over a 
camp fire with only the barest of conveniences and supplies in their 
possession. The camp fires not only served to cook their food on, 
but provided protection from the wild animals which were ever lurk - 
ing in the shadows of the night. 

The Settlers route led across the Couga and Sundays River, up 
the steep and terrible Addo Hill, across the Addo Bush with its ever 
present elephant herds and bounding springbok; passed the Quaggas 
Flat to Bushman's River. After fording the river at Rautenbach's 
Drift, the Bushman Heights were scaled and a few miles further on 
the banks of a large field pond known now as Settlers Vlei,was reach- 
ed. At Assegai Bush sone of the companies went directly east for 
about 25 miles to the Dixon Location, others continued northeast to 
Grahamstown and then east for about 12 miles to the Dixon Location. 

A Government staff member had accompanied the Dixon Party 
for the purpose of guiding them to their proper location and to show 
them the surveyed plat allotments, as well as to help them get settl- 
ed the best they could. 

The Dixon Location was a tract of land about two miles square 
in size. Located 12 miles east of Grahamstown and separated from the 
J. T. Erith Location to the East by a tributary of the Kowie River, 
which had its origin in this area. Across the river to the south was 
the Willson location, unde r the leadership of the Rev. William Board- 
man, whose daughter Judith became the wife of John Henry Dixon in 
18 26. Adjoining the Dixon Location to the West was the C. Dalgairns 
Location of thirty-three persons, from London. 

As youngsters, the second and third generation of Dixons, have 
been thrilled by the story handed down about our Grandfather John 
Henry Dixon, discovering the rogue elephant in his corral and how he 
melted a pewter spoon to make a bullet in which to shoot the elephant. 
The Dixon and Willson Settlers had many skirmishes with the elephant 
for they were located in the established paths of these maurading 
elephant herds. At first many of the Settlers took "pot shot" at these 
elephant herds with only a light "fowling piece" (gun). Much to their 
dismay, these shots did no mortal harm to the elephants. The shots 
only irritated and angered the elephants to the point where they charg- 
ed in all directions, laying waste to the trees, plants, crops, and all 
buildings that were in their path. 

After a journey of nearly 7000 miles, lasting nearly six months, 



24 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



the Dixon Family finally arrived at their new home. The kind hearted 
Dutch farmer stopped the oxen and wagon at a clearing among the 
trees and directed "his colored boys" to begin unloading the wagons. 

Having emptied his wagon, the Dutch farmer waved goodbye and 
headed west, leaving the Dixon Family sitting on the boxes and bag- 
gage; their only earthly possessions. It was then they began to real- 
ize they were alone in the wilderness, with no mode of transportation 
to leave, no nearby towns or stores in which to purchase the necessit- 
ies of life, not even a shelter from the storms or blistering sun. Their 
survival was dependent on their own two hands and the Almighty God, 
the Provider of all. 

When the youngest Dixon girl asked her mother where they were 
going to sleep that night, the realities of providing a shelter, brought 
John Henry to action, and he began setting up the tent the Government 
had loaned him as a temporary shelter. Soon the tent was pitched, 
and as many of the boxes and luggage as possible, were taken inside. 
A campfire was built and the evening meal prepared. This was the 
first meal and first night on their own property. This was their new 
home . 

Having been a finished carpenter by trade in native England, and 
having his own tools plus the tools he had purchased from the Govern- 
ment at Algoa Bay, John Henry immediately set to work to find mat- 
erials to build his family a permanent shelter. With limited money 
and no towns or stores nearby to purchase the necessary lumber, the 
Government had given the Settlers permission, free of charge for one 
year, to cut timber from the public lands for the building of their 
houses. 

In all directions could be heard the familiar sound of the axes as 
they cut through the trees. The men, women and children all joined 
in transporting the timber and thatch to the homesites. As yet there 
were very few oxen and wagons and no horses available for the heavy 
work. 

Being a skilled workman the Dixon home became a better built 
and nicer looking home than some of the neighbors who built a "wattle 
and daub" structure, which consisted of upright poles stuck in the gr- 
ound with rafters fastened to them and a reed or rush thatch covering 
the rafters. The walls were plastered inside and out with water 
mixed clay. The floors were usually made of clay and a mat or rug 
was nailed up at the door and windows. 

Other structures were mere dugouts with a thatched roof over 
the hole. With the coming of the wet, winter season, their habitations 
became very unsatisfactory and of short duration. 

With a form of shelter provided for his family, and although he 
knew very little about farming, it was necessary for John Henry to 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



25 



begin to clear the land and prepare it for planting wheat and veg- 
etables. If he and his family were to live, he had to provide the food 
for their use by raising it. There was no neighborhood grocer or 
baker to buy the necessary foodstuffs. The Government had allowed 
the Settlers to draw on their deposit money for the necessary farm 
implements, tools and the necessary food to carry them until they 
could harvest their first crop. 

The planted wheat and vegetables sprouted and were growing very 
well until just before the December harvest when there appeared a 
"rust" which attacked the stalks of the wheat and killed it. The 
wheat crop for that year was a complete failure. There was less 
wheat harvested than was planted. There not being enough harvested 
to provide seed for the coming year, let alone the food they were de- 
pen ding on for their sustenance. 

To John Henry Dixon and his Party, the wheat failure was a 
severe blow. All they had to show for the hard work of six months 
farming were the few vegetable they were lucky to mature. Now with 
the failure of the wheat crop there was no income to pay off their debt 
to the Government, to buy more seed, or to pay their living expenses 
until a new crop was raised. 

The first half year of hard work and toil on the locations, had 
showed the settlers the limited possibilities of an agricultural settle- 
ment. Much of the ground allotted was not suitable for cultivation 
and the allotment of one hundred acres per family was not sufficient 
to provide them with an adequate living. 

The uncertain and irregular rainfall could not be supplemented 
with the waters from the nearby rivers , because the volume of water 
in these rivers ran from a raging torrent when it rained and filled the 
narrow and deep channels, to a dwindling, useless stream, at other 
times. The crops were planted on the high banks of each side of the 
river, and without the aid of pumps there, was no way to get the water 
from the lower river channels to the higher banks. 

As oxen, cows, horses and sheep were acquired, it was found 
that a considerable amount of pasture land was necessary to provide 
the cattle with sufficient feed; much more than the one hundred acres 
alloted them. 

What a trying time it was for John Henry Dixon. As head of 
the Dixon Party, it was his responsibility to see that each member of 
his party stayed within the confines of his location, unless they had 
a proper pass from him. They could not leave the District without a 
pass from the Deputy Land-drost at Grahamstown. The Settlers were 
forbidden to hire native servants. They had to do all of their own work 
both inside and outside the home. Under these trying and primitive 
living conditions, it was no wonder that many of the Settlers deserted 



26 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



their farms, going to the populated centers of Uitenhage, Capetown, 
Port Elizabeth, Graaff-Reinet, where these restrictions did not apply 
and where there was plenty of work for a skilled workman to be found 

How these Settlers envied their Dutch Neighbors or the other 
older settlers who had become established on their farms prior to the 
Albany Settlement. It was not unusual for one of these older farms to 
have 6, 000 or more acres of land, with slaves and Hotentot servants 
to do all the work; where they and their family lived in compara- 
tive ease and comfort. They being able to come and go as they pleas- 
ed with no passes or other restrictions being imposed on them. 

One of the bright spots in this despressing picture of the early 
Settlement was the moderate and pleasant climate of the Albany 
District. The general health of the community was excellent, espec- 
ially when considering the difficult and hardship conditions the Settlers 
were forced to live under. 

It has been said that some of the early settler Doctors were for- 
ced to leave the District due to the lack of sufficient patronage. 

As long as the Settlers did not own much livestock, they were not 
molested by the thieving natives. It was when they acquired herds of 
livestock that they commenced to have troubles with the native tribes. 

Many times during the eighteen months that Sir Rufus Donkin was 
acting Governor, he called at the Dixon house and location giving ad- 
vice and help in overcoming their problems and alleviating their hard- 
ships. It was through his help that the pass restrictions were relaxed, 
permitting many of the skilled workmen, who were starving on their 
farms, to go to the larger cities and town and contribute their skills. 

Sir Rufus Donkin was responsible for initiating the steps to make 
Algoa Bay a seaport, and Port Elizabeth a new town, named in honor 
of his deceased wife. 

It was Sir Rufus Donkin who laid the plans for establishing a 
centrally located town in the Albany District, within easy access to 
all the locations and where all administrative details were to be hand- 
led. This new town was named Bathurst in honor of the Colonial 
Secretary. Building lots were surveyed and sold. Barracks were 
planned and construction started. The magistrate's residence and of- 
fices (Drostdy) were commenced. Several cottages were built before 
Sir Rufus was recalled to England when the centrally located District 
Office plan withered and died. The District Office was then perman- 
ently established at Grahamstown, where it had temporarily been 
located. 

Before leaving for England, Sir Rufus was instrumental in having 
the Colonial Office pay back to the Settlers the amount of money they 
had charged the Settlers for their transportation from Algoa Bay to 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



27 



their locations in the Albany District, when they first arrived in 
South Africa. Sir Rufus Donkin was truly a" Champion of the Settlers". 

About three miles to the northeast of the Dixon Location, on the 
opposite side of the Kap River, was a large deposit of red clay called 
the"Clay Pits". For centuries this had been the native Kaffirs source 
of clay for making pots, dishes and various ornaments. In Jan- 
uary 1821, it was estimated that nearly 3000 native men and women 
appeared at the clay pits to carry off this prized clay to their villages. 
Not being satisfied with the clay alone, the natives always managed 
to drive away cattle belonging to the Settlers on the adjoining Loca- 
tions. In September of 1821, a young herder, aged 15 named Ben- 
jamin Anderson, suddenly disappeared, as well as the cattle he was 
herding near the Clay Pits. It was later discovered that he had been 
brutally murdered and the cattle driven across the 30 mile "no man's 
land", buffer strip, into Kaffirland by these natives. 

For the next 60 years, periodically the Settlers would organize, 
arm themselves, and march into Kaffirland and reclaim all the stolen 
cattle they could find. 

It was on one of these expeditions that Henry Aldous Dixon at the 
age of 15 ventured deep into the native territory. He helped recover 
over 10,000 head of cattle and his share amounted to several pounds 
sterling. He put it aside in a savings account and it paid part of his 
first trip to Utah. 

Even though the natives had permission from the Government to 
come across the border and carry away the clay, it was unlawful for 
the Settlers to barter or trade or have any dealings with the Natives. 
Some of the Settlers felt that since the Government gave the natives 
permission to carry off the red clay and with it any of the Settlers' 
cattle they had the right to compensate for the cattle losses by illicit- 
ly bartering and trading beads and trinkets for ivory from the Kaffirs. 

One of the Settlers was suddenly surprised by a military patrol, 
while in the act of trading with a band of Kaffirs. He had his wagon 
and oxen taken to military headquarters, together with all the ivory be- 
longing to the natives. The natives thinking this was a pre-arranged 
trick, set upon the Settler and stabbed him to death. 

In this year of the second crop failure and amid these native dep- 
radations, John Henry Dixon's wife, Margaret, presented him with 
his fifth child, and her only boy, William Henry Dixon, on November 
24, 1821, at Grahamstown, C. P. 

In 1822, after the third successive crop failure and apparent fin- 
ancial ruin for John H. Dixon, his wife, Margaret set sail from Port 
Elizabeth to return to England for the settlement of an inheritance and 
other business transactions. 

After the second wheat crop failure, which was caused mainly by 



28 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



"rust", the Government received a new "Bengel" wheat seed which 
was issued to the Settlers as a rust resistive seed corn. It proved 
to be a miserable failure in living up to its reputation and guarantee. 
The third crop failure of 1822 was as severe, if not more so than the 
18 21 crop failure. 

This crop failure aggravated by the continuous depradations of the 
natives had so undermined the economic position of the Albany Settle- 
ment that several of the leading Settlers decided to call a special pub- 
lic meeting to discuss their affairs, appoint a special committee to go 
to Capetown and meet with the Governor, and discuss their economic, 
social and political affairs. 

Circulars were distributed designating May 24, 1822 as the day 
for this meeting, but the Land-drost forbade the meeting. The day 
the meeting was to be held the Governor issued a proclamation, in 
the most threatening terms. He reminded the Settlers they were not 
allowed to hold any public meetings without his consent. If they did, 
severe penalties would be levied on them. 

The meeting was called off and there were several months delib- 
erations amongst the Settlers as to the next course of action they 
should pursue. Finally a request for permission to hold a meeting 
was signed by 97 influential and responsible men of the District, and 
was given to the Land-drost in December of 1822. The petition was 
forwarded to the Governor who immediately denied permission to hold 
the meeting on the grounds that the petition failed to state with suffic- 
ient precision the objects for which the meeting was to be called. 

Although, at this time, public meetings were not permitted, the 
obnoxious pass system was abolished. This pass system had virtual- 
ly made the Settlers prisoners of their own locations by requiring 
them to obtain a pass to leave the District from the Land-drost, stat- 
ing where they were going, when they would return, and what purpose 
their business was for. To go from one location to another, they 
were required to get a pass from the Party Leader. 

Thus with the freedom of movement granted the Settlers, those 
least adapted to farming, or who had lost their interest and faith in 
ever being able to make a living as an agriculturist, picked up what 
few earthly possessions they had and moved to the nearby towns and 
settlements. They engaged themselves at their old trades learned in 
England, or set themselves at a newly acquired trade or business. 
The demand for skilled workmen was great in these young and new 
centers of population. Many of the Settlers even travelled as far as 
Capetown to seek their fortunes. 

The Settlers leaving their locations were fully aware they were 
forfeiting their rights to the free land promised them. The agree- 
ment with the Government was that they were required to live on their 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



29 



land for three years before receiving title to it. 

The Settlers still "chaffing" from their failure to hold public 
meetings or to personally bring their problems before the Governor, 
led to the preparation of a document, dated March 10, 1823. It was 
signed by 171 leading men of the Settlement. It set forth in restrain- 
ed but firm language the position of the Settlers. This document was 
addressed and sent directly to Lord Bathurst of the British Govern- 
ment, London, England, bypassing all local and colonial officials 
who had refused to help them with their problems. 

"To the Right Honourable the Earl Bathurst, Secretary of State 
for the Colonial Department, etc. etc. etc. . " 

"The subscribing colonists in South Africa, who emigrated in the 
year 1819 under the patronage of their native Government, are com- 
pelled by a sense of justice to themselves, and of duty to the Govern- 
ment under whose auspices they embarked, to lay before your Lord- 
ship a statement of the real circumstance s which have prevented their 
advancement. " 

"That whatever may have been the individual disappointments and 
failures incidental to so numerous an emigration, they do not present 
themselves to His Majesty's Government with any complaint of the 
natural disadvantages to the country to which they have been sent. 
And they have ever been actuated by one undivided feeling of respect 
and gratitude for the liberal assistance of the British Government, a 
feeling which future reverses can never efface. And they more grate- 
fully recognize an additional instance of the same favourable disposi- 
tion in the late modification of the collonial law of succession, which 
they hail as a pledge that their interest (where not opposed to the 
rights of their fellow subjects) will never have lost sight of by His 
Majesty's Government." 

"That although the settlers must lament that in its earlier stages 
the prosperity of this settlement has been checked in several import- 
ant instances, through the mis -apprehensions of the general or local 
authorities, yet they gratefully acknowledge the prompt and generous 
exertions of Government in providing the means of subsistence on the 
commencement of the settlement, and in alleviating as far as possible 
the severe visitations of repeated and total failures of their wheat 
crops. And they cannot omit the expression of their particular grati- 
tude to the acting Governor, Sir Rufane Donkin, who devoted to their 
prosperity a great share of his personal attention; to whom they owed 
the establishment of a town in the centre of the new settlement, as 
the seat of its magistracy; and a system of military defense, during 
which they were free from Caff re depradations ; by making arrange- 
ments for a friendly intercourse with the Caff res, and by his solicit- 



30 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



ous attentions to the interest and wishes of the settlers, he inspired 
them with a degree of energy and hope, of which they are now left 
only the recollection." 

"That is the peculiar hardship of their situation, placed in a re- 
mote corner of the British Dominions, with their whole interest and 
prospects committed to the unlimited control of one individual, and 
possessing no security that their situation is thoroughly understood or 
properly represented, that they have been debarred all means of ex- 
pressing their collective sentiments upon matters of the utmost im- 
portance to their common interests." 

"That it has long, and from the most distressing proofs, become 
evident to the settlers that the colonial government (situated at the op- 
posite extremity of the colony, where every particular, whether of 
soil and climate, or the constitution, pursuits and interests of society, 
is totally different)possesses no adequate means of ascertaining their 
actual wants. " 

"That under this conviction, it was contemplated by a small num- 
ber of the principal settlers to consult together upon the most advis- 
able mode of making his Excellency the Governor acquainted with the 
peculiarities of their situation; but this intention was met not only by 
positive prevention, but by public imputations against the views and 
motives of the settlers in general, which they felt to be wholly unmer- 
ited. " 

"That being thus prevented from communication with the colonial 
government, they have for twelve months continued to labour under 
the effects of a series of measures calculated only to extinguish the 
small remains of enterprise and confidence that had survived the 
numerous disappointments they had previously encountered; and when 
at length their situation from the increasing and unpunished incursion 
of the Caff res had become really unsupportable , they were reduced to 
the necessity of requesting permission to meet in the manner pointed 
out to them as legal, for the purpose of making their situation known 
to His Majesty's Government. But as this also has been virtually de- 
nied to them, they are obliged to content themselves with offering to 
your Lordship this imperfect but faithful sketch of their situation in 
general, but more particularly of the uniform reversal of every mea- 
sure previously resorted to for their advantage. " 

"That as it does not appear that any natural obstacle is opposed 
to their advancement, they are induced to submit a candid statement 
of the artificial disadvantage by which they are surrounded, in the 
confident hope that this settlement will not be allowed to fall a sacri- 
fice to them. 11 

"That upon their arrival, they found themselves placed according 
to the terms accepted by them in England (before they were aware of 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



31 



the peculiarities of this country), upon grants of 100 acres each in a 
country where it still appears necessary to the susistence of the Cape 
Dutch farmer to grant him 4, 000 acres; that this, together with the 
withholding two-thirds of the deposit money, which it was stipulated 
should be repaid after location, had the effect of precluding the maj- 
ority of the settlers from pursuing the mode of farming usual in this 
country, and of directing their attention exclusively to agriculture. " 

"That although the disappointments hitherto suffered in this pur- 
suit must in a great measure refer to extraordinary and unavoidable 
causes, yet the settlers cannot but observe that their future prospects 
appear totally barred by the weightest artificial obstacles. " 

"That besides the injurious effects of the distinction above men- 
tioned in drawing away a portion of the settlers to more profitable 
pursuits, the remaining part who may possess land of an extent worth 
attending to, can have no inducement to raise a surplus produce while 
the colonial government reserves to itself, in the entire supply of the 
troops, the monopoly of the only internal market, and they can never 
look for an external trade while the prosperity of this part of the col- 
ony continues to be subservient to the local interest of Cape Town; 
while no direct trade is allowed to Algoa Bay; while no exportation is 
permitted except through Cape Town, and dependent upon the state of 
that market, and the advantage of possessing a sea- port is in a great 
measure lost to the settlement; while every article of import brought 
to Algoa Bay or the Kowie is burdened with all the expense of re -ship- 
ment from Cape Town. " 

"That the establishment of the town of Bathurst, as its seat of 
magistracy, was of the most material service to the settlement, as 
from its situation in the centre of the smaller parties it served to 
sustain in its vicinity a denser population that the circumstances of 
the country could otherwise induce; that its superior advantage of 
soil, its vicinity to the only part of the coast found capable of com- 
municating with the sea, and the erection of the residence of the 
chief magistrate at the public expense, had induced many individuals 
to expend their means in establishing themselves there; that the re- 
moval of the seat of magistracy and the withdrawing the troops and 
government support from a town upon which they had fixed their first 
hopes, and upon which depended all their future prospects of a market, 
has been productive of the worst effects upon the interest and pros- 
pects of the settlement in general; as besides its directly ruinous 
consequences to individuals, it has drawn away the population from 
the nucleus of the settlement, and created a general distrust in the 
stability of the measures of the Government. " 

"That the most pressing and insupportable of their grievances 



32 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



arise from the constant depredations of the Caff res who have within 
a few months committed several murders, and deprived the settle- 
ment of the greater part of its cattle; that their depredations are in a 
great measure produced by relinquishing that line of policy which 
held out to those tribes a hope of procuring, by friendly barter, such 
commodities as their acquired wants have rendered necessary and 
which they are now obliged to procure by theft or force; by discount- 
enancing and withdrawing the military force from the new settlement 
of Fredricksburg, and permitting the Caff res to plunder and force 
the settlers to retire, and ultimately to burn it to the ground; by re- 
fusing aid to the more advanced farmers , plundering parties have been 
encouraged to drive those in, and afterwards to extend their incursions 
to all parts of the settlement, and even beyond it; by exasperating that 
tribe which had hitherto preserved the appearances of friendship in 
attempting to seize their chief (Gaika) in his own village, and by with- 
holding from the local military authorities that discretionary power 
which they were formerly vested, which, by enabling them to enforce 
summary restitution, showed the Caff res that the offence must in- 
stantly be followed by the punishment; whereas, by waiting the de- 
cision of the Commander-in-chief, 600 miles distant, in every emer- 
gency, offences are allowed to accumulate to an alarming amount;and 
the slender means of defense the settlement possesses, deprived of 
the power of acting with promptitude, is forced to present to the Caf- 
fres at once the appearance of enmity and weakness. " 

"That it thus appears to the colonists, instead of the new settle- 
ment ever deriving any advantage from the civilization of these sav- 
ages, that the existing measures can only lead to a war of mutual ex- 
termination. " 

"That the settlers refrain from adverting to other numerous and 
serious obstacles to the prosperity of this settlement, arising from 
the system of government and laws to which they are subjected, from 
the enlivening assurance that these considerations continue to occupy 
the attention of His Majesty's Ministers. When they contemplate the 
immense resources of fertile and unappropriated territory this colony 
possesses in their immediate vicinity, and the provident care of the 
British Government to preserve the future inhabitants from the con- 
tamination of slavery, they cannot but cherish the hope that their pre- 
sent distresses are only temporary, and that at no distant period a 
numerous and flourishing colony may be here governed upon British 
principles, and by British laws. " 

To those Settlers who had "weathered" the famine and were still 
on their locations, a new tragedy to test their courage and endurance 
was thrust upon them the latter part of the year 1823, when excessive 
rain began to fall. Ever since the Settlers had arrived in the Zuurveld, 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



33 



the rainfall had been very scarce and there had been a drought. Now 
with the rain beginning in October, which was a most welcome sight; 
it continued unceasingly for more than a week, accompanied by ter- 
rific windstorms. 

The damage to the crops, the orchards and gardens, the livestock, 
the buildings and dams and other improvements, was the most deva- 
stating natural phenomena sustained by the Settlement in its entire 
history. It was such a great loss that it thereafter became known and 
referred to as "The Flood". 

The few patches of wheat which survived "The Flood" were at- 
tacked for the 4th successive year by "rust", and swarms of locust 
and caterpillars added to the destruction of the remaining crops. 

This was the low ebb for the Albany Settlement. The test had been 
made. Only the time tested farmers now remained on the land. The 
next two years witnessed the beginning of prosperity, which eventual- 
ly came to the Settlement. 

From about the middle of the year, 1824, many changes and 
numerous innovations were introduced by the Government for the ben- 
efit of the Settlers. In July of 1824 licenses were issued by the Land- 
drost to European traders, giving them permission to gather at Fort 
Wilshire, in the neutral zone between the black and whites territory, 
on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. There was to be no trafic in 
ammunition, firearms, or liquor. Here the natives brought their 
ivory, hides, gum, basketware and reed mats; which were then ex- 
changed for beads, tools, cotton goods, colored blankets, metal im- 
plements, wire and trinkets. After the 3 days at the fair, the Euro- 
pean traders were required to go back to the Colony across the Fish 
River. The natives were required to return to Kaffirland, across 
the Keiskama River. 

These Native Fairs and the trading with the Kaffirs was the be- 
ginning point for prosperity in the Eastern Province. Grahamstown 
quickly became the wholesale distributive center for these Settler- 
traders. Port Elizabeth and Port Kowie developed into very import- 
ant ports for the exporting of the native products as well as the im- 
porting of the articles traded to the natives. 

The reason for this change of attitude by the Governor towards 
the Settlers was never fully explained. Some felt he had been ordered 
by the British Government to change his ruinous methods. Others 
felt that the investigations and the Commissions of Inquiry had open- 
ed his eyes to the adverse effects his policies were exerting on the 
Settlers . 

In February of 1825, Governor Charles Somerset, made his first 
an only visit to the Settlement. Here he personally became aware of 
their insecurity and immediate needs. 



34 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



To make ammends for his action in checking the establishment of 
the Town of Bathurst as the District Seat in 1822, the Governor now 
volunteered free land to person who would build houses, of approved 
design and value, in Bathurst. 

The uncompleted Drotsdy was converted into a Grammar School 
by the Rev. William Boardman. He became the first teacher there but 
not for long, for he died in September of 1827. This old building is 
still standing and is one of the most imposing private residence in the 
Albany District at Bathurst. 

Many of the Settlers who had managed to stay on their farms by 
the year 1825, and because of adverse financial setbacks had been 
unable to pay back their Government loans, made for the purchase of 
implements, seed and rations during their first three years of resid- 
ency, were relieved of this obligation by the Governor in his recom- 
mendation to the Colonial Secretary, after his tour of inspection. 
In this same year the Settlers were granted permission to hire Kaffir 
and Hottentot farm laborers, which was a welcome measure. 

The most important and beneficial reform as a result of the 
Governors personal visit to the Settlements, was the adequate exten- 
sion of land grants whereby a Settler was able to obtain sufficient 
land acreage to justify his raising cattle and sheep. This action be- 
came the mainstay and lifesaver of those Settlers remaining on the 
land. 

Margaret Walden Dixon, wife of John Henry Dixon, died June 21, 
1824 and was buried at Grahamstown. Rev. William Geary conduct- 
ed the funeral service. She was survived by her husband and 5 children. 

As conditions became more settled and prosperous, John Henry 
Dixon of Waaplaats married Judith Boardman at Grahamstown by the 
Rev. Thomas Ireland on January 12, 1826. The ceremony was witnes- 
sed by Robert Godlonton and Henry and Alice Lloyd, friends of family. 

Judith Boardman was the second eldest daughter of the Reverend 
William Boardman and Margaret Hayes. She was born at Newberry, 
Lancaster, England on December 16, 1796. She had one older sister, 
three younger sisters and four younger brothers. Her father, Rev. 
William Boardman was acting leader of the Willson Party, one of the 
First Colonial Ministers of the Settlement, Master of the Grammar 
School at Bathurst. He died in September of 1827. 

When Judith left England with her parents and family as one of 
the 1820 Settlers to the Cape of Good Hope, she was twenty- three 
years of age and was entitled to a land grant. 

Being the second eldest in this large family of boys and girls, she 
had been accustomed to household work and sharing the responsibili- 
ties of caring for her family. Now with her recent marriage to John 
Henry Dixon, she assumed the full household responsibilities of being 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



35 



mother to his five motherless children: Mary, age 15; Emma, age 
12; Eliza, age 10; Sarah, age 8; and William Henry, age 5. 

In the year 1827, Judith Boardman Dixon gave birth to a daughter 
who was christened Anne Judith Dixon. Whether Anne was born at 
the Dixon location, Waaplaats, or in the Town of Grahamstown is yet 
to be verified. 

With the first personal appearance of Governor Somerset to the 
Albany Settlement in February 1825, the small village at the mouth 
of the Kowie River (Port Kowie) received the new name of Port Fran- 
ces. The enlarged harbor facilities and allied buildings and ware- 
houses; the forming of the Albany Shipping Co. to provide for coastal 
trade, all receiving official government favor; encouraged many of 
the Settlers to invest in building sites and erect homes at Port Frances 

In July 1825, John Henry Dixon bought lots 21 and 43 at Port 
Frances, the Settlement Port. Title to these two lots were issued to 
him on December 1, 1825. 

In December of 1831, a son was born to Judith Boardman Dixon. 
On January 8, 18 32 he was given the name of John and baptized at 
Grahamstown by the Rev. William Carlisle. He only lived four months 
and was buried at Grahamstown on May 9, 1832 by the Rev. Carlisle. 

With the private native trading licenses having been issued to 
numerous persons of good character for use beyond the colonial 
boundaries, native trade soon became a very profitable business. The 
trade in ivory, hides, and gum for this period was estimated at about 
$200,000 annually, and increased each succeeding year. All traffic 
in arms, ammunition and liquor was prohibited and strictly enforced. 

It was in this period that some of the most adventurous Settlers 
awoke to the realization the big game hunting for elephants, lion, 
buffalo, hippopotumus , and rhinoceros could become a very profitable 
business. In the past the traders had relied on the natives to bring 
in the game. 

In A. J. Chaplin's Biography of Henry Hartley, and who is ac- 
credited with a record of 1200 elephants killed in one year, the follow- 
ing incident is related: 

"While he and his sons were way-laying some elephants at a 
drift, a lion was prowling about and become troublesome. His sons 
suggested the happy despatch but he would not permit the shooting as 
the report of the rifles would have dispersed the elephants. The lion 
was walking in the direction of a low bush, and Mr. Hartley managed 
to crawl, unperceived by the beast, behind the bush. When the great 
brute was quite near, Hartley suddenly popped his head over the bush 
and shook his massive beard, making at the same time a loud roaring 
noise. This apparition was too much for his majesty the King of the 
forest, as the royal beast incontinently fled, leaving the Hartleys 



36 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



convulsed with laughter, but absolute masters of the situation. 11 

With the granting of an extension in land grant acreage, some of 
the Settlers moved to larger farms in the grazing area of Somerset 
East, and Graaff-Reinett Districts, but the majority of Settlers stuck 
to their farming on their increased acreage in the Albany District. 
Through the lessons of bitter experience in the first six years, they 
learned to adapt themselves to the local conditions. The farming of 
wheat was confined to only the most favorable ground and the raising 
of barley, rye, Indian corn and maize was restricted to those areas 
where climate and soil were favorable. The raising of cattle and 
sheep soon became the mainstay of those remaining on the land. 

Before 1826 the majority of the sheep raised was for mutton, but 
in the year 1826 several of the large sheepmen imported the "Merino" 
and other wool producing breeds of sheep. Ten years later the value 
of exported wool from Port Elizabeth amounted to $130,000. 00. Five 
years after, it amounted to $180, 000. 00. By 1957 the wool production 
in South Africa exceeded 300 million pounds in weight and valued at 
$300 million annually. Truly the wool industry founded by these early 
Settlers became the most important of all South Africa's farming 
activities. 

On the land unsuited for sheep raising, horned cattle were intro- 
duced. On the most choice land and near the water, all types of fruit 
and vegetable were raised in abundance and of excellent quality. 

From 1829 to the middle of 1834, there was continuous trouble 
with the Kaffirs. From three to five thousand head of the Settlers' 
cattle and sheep and horses were stolen annually and driven off to 
Kaffirland. There were no large raids, but hundreds of small ones 
which were impossible to control. In these raids some of the Settlers 
became victims of the Kaffir assegais. 

By July 1834 the natives had become so bold that they attacked 
the store of a Settler, William Purcel. He was murdered for refus- 
ing to trade on the Sabbath. For the next several months everything 
was calm and comparatively peaceful, and then on December 21, 1834, 
twenty thousand Kaffir natives poured into the Settlements, stealing, 
setting fire to the buildings and killing the Settlers. 

This 6th Kaffir War between the "whites and blacks" became the 
most serious and tragic war to- date. In ten short days the natives 
destroyed all that the Settlers had so painstakingly and laboriously 
built up in the past fifteen years. They burned 456 farmhouses, pill- 
aged 300 others, destroyed 60 laden wagons, drove off 5 , 700 horses, 
12,000 cattle and 162,000 sheep and goats; a total loss estimated at 
over $1, 000, 000. The Districts of Albany, Somerset East and as far 
as Uitenhage District were run- over by these maurauding Kaffir hordes. 

Most of the Settlers and their families were able to escape from 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



37 



their farms just in time and fled to the villages and nearby town; 
leaving behind all of their worldly possessions. They now had less 
material possessions than when they landed at Algoa Bay 15 years 
earlier. 

John Henry Dixon, upon hearing the news of the on-coming native 
warriors, quickly loaded his wife Judith, daughters Mary, Emma, 
Eliza, Sarah, Anne and son William Henry into their covered wagon 
and with other members of his location, dashed at breakneck speed 
for Grahamstown and protection. If John Henry had decided to seek 
protection at Bathurst rather than Grahamstown, they would have 
had to make a second break on Christmas Day. This was the 
day the natives made their attack against Bathurst. After a grim 
struggle the defenders of Bathurst were able to withstand the savage 
attack and to drive the natives back. But a few days later the Settlers 
realized the odds were against them in holding out for any length of 
time, so they decided they should make a dash for Grahamstown and 
better protection. They accomplished this difficult and amazing task 
without a single casualty; although they had several skirmishes on 
their way to safety. 

No doubt, John Henry upon arriving at Grahamstown and seeing 
that his wife and children were safely arranged for, volunteered to go 
out into the Settlements of the surrounding country and help bring in 
those families who were in immediate danger . The Grahamstown Vol- 
unteers were organized for this very purpose. 

Up to this point the natives had only attacked Bathurst and had 
threatened the village of Salem. All their other attacks were con- 
fined to the small isolated farms and areas. 

A Quaker by the name of Richard Gush, through his courageous 
conduct, single handed averted possible annihilation to the inhabitants 
of Salem. Against the advice of the majority of the people seeking 
protection in the village of Salem, and turning a deaf ear to the pleas 
of his family, he rode out unarmed to meet the hundreds of Kaffirs 
who had surrounded the Town and were all ready to make their attack. 
His son-in-law and two other young men, unarmed followed him at a 
distance. Dismounting in front of the astonished enemy, he removed 
his coat to show he was unarmed, and boldly called upon their leader 
to step forward. So astonished and impressed by his courage, that 
they refrained from falling upon him and killing him, and immediately 
called for their leader. After a lengthy council they agreed not to 
attack the village if Gush would ride back, collect certain gifts, and 
return with them to the meeting place, still alone and unarmed. These 
demands Gush cooly carried out in detail, whereupon the Kaffirs fill- 
ed with wonder and amazement at his courage and faith in them with- 



38 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



drew without further trouble and Salem was saved. 

Just two and one -half months later, towards the close of this 
period of fright, turmoil, uncertainty and death; Judith Boardman 
Dixon gave birth to her youngest son, Henry Aldous Dixon, on March 
14, 1835, at Grahamstown, Cape Province, South Africa. It was 
in St. George's Church, Grahamstown, that he was christened. 
The same Church building had only recently been used as a place of 
refuge for several thousand of the Settlers who had come to Graham- 
stown for protection. Not only had it been a refuge for the women and 
children, but also served as a powder magazine for their ammunition. 

By the latter part of March 18 35, the natives had been pushed out 
of the Colony and out behind the neutral territory, and by May 10th a 
new Eastern Boundry had been established. It was not until September 
18 35, that a peace treaty was signed and the 6th Kaffir War became 
history. 

For the majority of the Settlers, the next few years were devoted 
to the task of restoring their shattered fortunes. 

In re- building their burnt- out homesteads, many of the farmers 
constructed their new farm buildings along the lines of a minature 
fortress, with watch towers, guard houses, loopholes .embrasures and 
high surrounding stone walls. These farmhouse fortresses, later 
played a most important part of preserving life and property in sub- 
sequent wars and raids. 

In a surprising short time, houses, barns and outbuildings 
were rebuilt, fences repaired, ploughing resumed and livestock 
replenished. The visable ravages of war were concealed, but many 
more years of hard toil was required to pay for the heavy „ financial 
losses suffered by the Settlers. 

Unlike the Mormon Pioneers "trek" of 1847 when the Latter-Day 
Saints were driven from the edge of civilization to the wilderness; 
the Dutch Farmer, living in the Districts of the Eastern Colony, be- 
came disgusted with the British Governments frontier policy and the 
emancipation of their slaves in 1834. They started, by their own free 
will, to leave the Colony and seek new homes in the new areas to the 
North and Northwest. By the end of 1837, a total of 2,000 persons 
had left the Colony and crossed the Orange River. It has been called 
"The Great Trek of South Africa" , and its participants "The Voor 
Trekkers". 

The majority of the Settlers regretted to see their Dutch neighbors 
leaving, for since their arrival on the locations, they had respected 
and developed strong bonds of friendship, trust and mutual interests. 
Their assistance in defending the frontier lines was of inestimable 
value and worth. 

By 1850, John Henry Dixon had worked hard and long and had ac- 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



39 



cumulated sufficient wise investments to retire. In his 64th year, he 
bought a house in Uitenhage where some of his friends were living in 
retirement. 

A short time before his retirement decision was made, his young- 
est daughter Anne, married John Godlieb Hartman at Grahamstown. 

John Henry rented his house at Grahamstown and took his wife, 
Judith and youngest son Henry Aldous, who had just returned from a 
native expedition into Kerlies Country, with all their belongings and 
moved to their new home at Uitenhage , approximately 100 miles south 
of Grahamstown. 

It was here in Uitenhage in about 1854 that Henry A. Dixon, a 
young man of nineteen years became acquainted with Elder Leonard 
I. Smith from Salt Lake City, Utah, and was taught the Gospel of 
Jesus Christ. It was here in Uitenhage that after being baptized a 
member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints that John 
Henry Dixon told young Henry, "that inasmuch as you have gone in di- 
rect opposition to my wishes you must try the world on your own". 

John Henry Dixon and his wife Judith were still living at Uiten- 
hage in January 18, 1862 when their L.D.S. missionary son, Henry 
A. returned to the land of his birth. At this time John Henry Dixon 
offered to set his son up in business and to see that he was comfort- 
ably provided for the remainder of his life, if he would marry and re- 
main in the land of his birth, South Africa. 

It was here in Uitenhage in April of 1864 that Henry A. Dixon gave 
his last good bye to his Mother. She died here in Uitenhage on Septem- 
ber 23, 1865. His father returned to Grahamstown to live with his wid- 
owed daughter Anne. 

On April 1, 1874, at the age of 88 years, John Henry Dixon died 
at Grahamstown, C. P. , South Africa, where he was buried. 

In reference to the death of his Father, Henry A. Dixon wrote 
the following in a letter to his sister Anne: 

Provo City 
13 July 1874 

Mrs. Anne Hartman 

Dundas Street, Grahamstown 

Cape of Good Hope, South Africa 

Dear Sister, 

Received yours 1 of the 4th April announcing the death of our 
dear Father. The first intimation I received was from a newspaper 
I received, presume from you. The blow was not as severe as might 
have been, had he been a younger man. 

His advanced age of 88 and from the tenor of your letters, 
general debility, caused me to expect it. He has fulfilled the measure 



40 



JOHN HENRY DIXON 



of his creation, honourably and faithfully, and has gone to reap the 
reward of his labors. I feel proud of my Parentage, and hope I may 
never bring discredit on the family --------------- 

/S/ HENRY A. DIXON 



So closed the life's work of the Leader of the Dixon Party. He 
was a member of that band of valiant and courageous 1820 Settlers 
who left his native land, London, England, for the unknown land of 
South Africa. As a fighting Pioneer, he helped conquer the soil, the 
natives, and the elements. He lived to enjoy the fruits of his labors 
and to witness the gradual development of his adopted Country to a 
thriving and prosperous nation. 



Clarence Dixon Taylor 




Thames River Near London, England 



REV. WILLIAM BQaRDMaN 




REVEREND WILLIAM BOARDMAN 



17 7 6 - 18 2 7 

T he Boardman family of Haydock Lodge, Holbrook Hall and Ash- 
ton Manor, Lancaster, England, was a highly influential family, own- 
ing considerable farm land at Haydock and vicinity, as well as com- 
mercial property near the Princes Dock, Liverpool. This latter 
property being sold to the municipality of Liverpool about 1827 for a 
considerable amount. The proceeds from this sale was left to the 
brothers, Thomas Boardman and James Boardman. 

The second son born to Thomas Boardman and Mary Ashton in 
1776 at Ashton Le Williams, Lancaster, England was given the name 
of William. William the subject of this sketch had an older brother 
Thomas and a younger brother James and two younger sisters, Mary 
and Judith. 

At the age of 22, in 1794, William Boardman married Margaret 
Hayes, sister of John Hayes, solicitor of Liverpool, who had the 
management of the Boardman real estate properties. 

For the next seven years, William and his wife Margaret, lived 
at Newberry, Lancaster, where the following children were born: 

Mary, born October 5, 1795; Judith (my great grandmother) was 
born December 16, 1796; Susannah, born October 27, 1798; Thomas, 
born September 25, 1800. 

By the time the next child, Margaret, was born on December 14, 
1802, the family had moved to nearby Newton, where the following 
children were born: 

John Ashton, born July 8, 1804; Sarah Hayes, born August 3, 
1806; James Hayes, born July 22, 1808. The youngest son, William, 
was born February 14, 1811, at Blackburn, England. 

The Rev. William Boardman was Master of Grammar School at 
Blackburn, Lancaster, England. He resigned in December 

1819 to accept the appointment of the Secretary of State as Colonial 
Minister for the Church of England in behalf of the British Settlers 
who were leaving England to colonize the Albany Settlement in the 
Cape of Good Hope, South Africa. 

In order to provide for the spiritual welfare of these African 
Settlers, the Imperial Parliment had made provisions whereby each 
party of 100 families could choose a Clergyman of their own choice 
(subject to approval of the Sec. of State) to accompany them to their 
new home. The clergyman was to receive approximately $500 
(100 pounds) annually from the British Government. 

Mr. Thomas Willson, a young and enthusiastic man, had contact- 
ed his friends and neighbors, selling them on the opportunities of the 
free land and the ease of livelyhood in the new Country - South Africa. 



42 



REV. WILLIAM BOARDMAN 



He had 307 persons subscribe and become members of his Party. 
Having sufficient members in his party to engage the services of a 
Clergyman, he had submitted the name of the Rev. William Boardman 
to the Secretary of State for his approval. Not only could the Rev. 
Boardman act as their Minister, but he could also organize Gram, 
mar School to educate their children in this new land. 

Thus the Rev. William Boardman became a member of the Will- 
son Party who sailed on the LaBelle Alliance ship. Of the 11 ships, 56 
Parties, and 3,487 Persons setting sail for the Cape of Good Hope; 
there were only two Church of England Ministers ( Rev. Boardman) 
and ( Rev. F. Mac Cleland) and one Methodist Minister (Rev. J. W. 
Shaw) appointed to care for the spiritual welfare of these settlers. 

According to Hockly, in his "Story of the British Settlers of 1820". 
the Rev. William Boardman of the Willson Party, and the Rev. F. 
McClelland of the Parker Party, both Church of England Clergymen, 
set sail from England merely as ordinary settlers and accordingly did 
not receive a Government salary at first; but soon after their arrival 
at the Cape they were appointed as Ministers of their respective part- 
ies and were paid a salary by the Government as provided. 

After saying goodbye to their 19 year old son Thomas, who was 
to remain in Blackburn, England, as an upholsterer apprenticed to 
Thomas Barton; Rev. Boardman, his wife Margaret Hayes Boardman, 
and their remaining eight children left for London on December 23, 
1819, where their transport vessel, La Belle Alliance, was lying at 
anchor. 

Upon arrival at London, they beheld eight, 3 masted sailing ves- 
sels, lying at anchor in the Thames River, and all imprisoned by the 
ice. Seeking out the Willson or London Party on the La Belle Alliance, 
which was frozen in at Depthford, the Boardman Family boarded the 
vessel in readiness for sailing just as soon as the ice would break up. 

This winter had been one of the most severe witnessed in England 
for many a year. For solid weeks the temperature had been below 
freezing, and a piercing, cold, artic wind, accompanied by snow had 
blown in from the north. All ships in the Thames River were frozen 
in solid, including the Cape of Good Hope Settler's Vessels. While the 
Settlers were waiting for the ice to break up and release the ships so 
as to proceed on their way to Africa. It was not unusual for them to 
be able to walk from one vessel to another on the ice, or from ship 
to shore without the aid of boat or gangplank. Amusements in the form 
of dancing and playing games on the ice was a common practice. Even 
refreshment stands were erected on the ice for the benefit of those 
who danced to the tunes of the fiddler. 

It was during these long hours and days of waiting that some of the 
passengers began to think and meditate on the big adventure they were 



REV. WILLIAM BOARDMAN 



43 



undertaking, eventually leaving the vessel for their home, never to 
return and sail. 

Finally on January 19, 1820 at 2:30 p.m. , the La Belle Alliance 
was loosened from its mooring at Depthford and continued down the 
River as far as Blackwall; near the residence of the river pilot. 
Here again the ship was tied fast to the mooring and unable to pro - 
ceed any further due to the thick ice which had formed. For a whole 
month, the LaBelle Alliance had only been able to proceed a distance 
of two miles down the Thames River. Disappointment, disgust, im- 
patience and restlessness was evidenced among the majority of pas- 
sengers . 

Finally on February 14th, the La Belle Alliance made it into 
the open waters of the sea, bound for the Cape of Good Hope. 

The La Belle Alliance vessel was somewhat crowded and strict 
ship regulations were posted and enforced. The British Government, 
including the Navy Board, had put forth great effort to provide and 
promote comfort and satisfactory living conditions for the emigrants. 
The food was simple, good and plentiful and was distributed on sche- 
dule as follows: On Mondays and Fridays - biscuits and beef. On 
Tuesdays and Saturdays - rum, pork and mustard. On Wednesdays 
- tea, cocoa, sugar, salt and soap. Every afternoon at 3:00 o'clock 
-water was allotted. All persons not appearing at the scheduled 
time lost their allotment. In cases of Illness, wine and other luxur- 
ies were available. Each ship carried a Doctor, as well as the Set- 
tler's Doctors, who were Dr. Thomas Cock, Dr. W. Combley and 
Dr. James Pawle of the Willson Party. 

As might be expected , where a large number of people are crowd.- 
ed together, sickness in the form of measles, whooping cough and 
smallpox made their appearance.lt was during this smallpox epidem- 
ic aboard the La Belle Alliance that Doctor Cock's wife and three 
children died of smallpx and were buried at sea. With his two re- 
maining children, Dr. Cock received permission to return to Eng- 
land by the first transport after March 20, 1821. 

In order to control these diseases, it was necessary at periodic 
intervals, to thoroughly clean, dis- infect and fumigate the ship. All 
which added to the distress and discomfort of the passengers. To do 
this, all personal belongings, such as clothing and bedding and such 
was taken on deck and thoroughly aired. After being returned below 
deck, the hatches were all closed and the ship completely fumigated 
with a poisonous gas. For a while this would control the rats, cock- 
roaches and germs on the ship. 

As a past-time, some of the men would put salt pork on a hook 
to fish. One particular day, one of the Settlers was fishing for sharks, 
which were swimming around the boat. Having been told how strong 



44 



REV. WILLIAM BOARDMAN 



a shark was, he had tied the line to his arm, and was almost dragged 
overboard by the shark who had swallowed his hook and bait, before 
being rescued by nearby fishermen 

On Sunday, Divine Services were held on the quarter deck. A 
fine awning was spread overhead and the sides were draped with flags. 
The awning provided a protection against the hot, tropical sun and 
the flags afforded a resemblance of privacy. Some Sundays when 
they were near the equator, it was necessary to throw buckets full of 
water around on the deck in order to try to keep cool and comfortable. 

The capstan, covered with the Union Jack, was the pulpit, and 
the seats for the congregation were made of the capstan bars. The 
prayers were read and a sermon delivered by the Rev. William Board- 
man. 

To many on board, the Sermon given on Sunday, March 12th, 
preached from the text "Grow in Grace", was the outstanding sermon 
delivered by the Rev. William Boardman, during the entire voyage. 

On this same Sunday evening, when all was quiet and peaceful, 
there arose a most terrific noice, which alarmed and frightened the 
women and children. Many on board thought it was some strange ship 
which had drawn up alongside, without anyone knowing of its presence., 
and pirates from this strange and suspicious ship, which had been 
sighted earlier, were boarding the vessel. As the noise subsided, the 
sound of the speaking trumpet at the bow of the boat, hailed the ship. 
The La Belle Alliance Captain answered in reply. By this time the 
passengers were pouring on deck to see what the excitement was , but 
all they could see was a light pass under the side of the ship and head 
westward. 

After anxious inquiry, the passengers were told that their ship 
had been hailed by King Neptune, the Governor of the Sea, and that he 
would be back the next day to claim tribute from all passengers who 
had never crossed the equator. 

At half past nine the next morning, the announcement was made 
from the forecastle by the sound of the bugle horn, blown by" Joe 
Bigbelly". A strong voice was heard to hail the ship, "Ship 
Ahoy? "To this question the Captain answered. Neptune next inquired, 
"What Ship?" The Captain then answered, "The La Belle Alliance, 
bound for the Cape of Good Hope with Settlers. " 

Next a large screen was rolled up, and there appeared the most 
frightful creatures imaginable. First appeared six, nearly naked men, 
with their bodies painted and marked like the cannibal native from 
New Zealand. Each had a large bamboo stick in his hands. These were 
the constables. Next came eight men, with ropes in their hand, pull- 
ing Neptune's car. In this car with Neptune, was his wife and child 



REV. WILLIAM BOARDMAN 



45 



and "Joe Bigbelly", who was blowing his horn with all the wind he had, 
of which he had plenty. The whole Royal Party were dressed most 
frightfully, and many of the children and young girls avoided them 
and would not let them come near them. Behind the Royal Car came 
the barber and his mate, carrying a bucket, a large brush for lather, 
and a piece of iron hoop for a razor. As the Royal Party approached 
the center of the ship, the Captain had four guns fired. The proces- 
sion proceeded to the star board gangway where Neptune's secretary 
appeared with a long paper scroll in his hand. This list contained 
the names of those whom tribute was demanded. As each name was 
read, the constables would seek out this person and bring them to 
Neptune's judgement seat. This consisted of a plank across a large 
tub of water. Questions were thrown at the individual by King Nep- 
tune. The barber would lather the individual's face with his brush and 
soap and then draw his razor across his face. The plank was then 
pulled out from under the individual and down in the tub of water he 
would land. Not content with the ducking in the tub, bucket upon buc- 
ket of water was dashed on them from above. 

To top off this big celebration, a grand ball was held in the eve- 
ning, which filled the Settlers with gaety and pleasure and helped 
break the monotony of the long voyage. 

Of great interest to the Boar dman children were the exciting days 
when a small speck of land would emerge above the water line and the 
vessel would soon drop anchor near one of the several islands on the 
way. How well they remember the steep, vine clad hills, and the 
oranges and grapes brought out to them by the dark skinned Madeira 
natives in their small, but well filled row boats. How they wished 
they could get off this small, crowded ship and play on the sandy shore 
of Las Palmas or Ascension Island. Few persons were permitted 
to go ashore and as soon as the fresh water tanks were refilled, they 
were once again sailing south. 

There were two or three times, the older children would never 
forget:-When the sea was running heavy and high, and the pouring 
rain forced the sailors to batten down the hatches-then in the midnight 
darkness, with the children clinging to their mothers -the water swept 
over the deck and the water swished in the hold below;-then the soft, 
hopeful voice of the mother, assuring them that all was well and every 
thing would be all right; but if it was the will of their Father -in -heaven , 
they would all go down together as a family. 

When about two-thirds of the way to their destination, a special 
meeting of all the heads of families was called to make final arrange- 
ments for settling in their new home. At this time, Mr. Willson.the 
Party Head, put in his claim for his rights to be "Lord of the Manor", 
"To fish in all the rivers of the Settlement; to hunt on all the grounds; 



46 



REV. WILLIAM BOARDMAN 



to cut timer out of all the forestsjand the whole party should enclose - 
his own lands and gardens and assist him in cultivating his lands, for 
at least the first two years. "He also put in claims for various duties 
he had performed in making arrangements with the Secretary of State, 
at the Agent's Office, and in making arrangements for the Clergy and 
Doctors. This was a very unfortunate incident for Mr. Willson; for 
his party members felt he was taking unfair advantage of them, and 
they drew up a resolution requesting the Governor of the Cape, not to 
make Mr. Willson "Lord of the Manor", but to allot directly to each 
his 100 acres of land. 

Mr. Willson later excused himself for abandoning his Party in 
Albany and returning to England by saying, " I sacrificed myself at 
the altar of duty for an ungrateful rabble who sought my life. " 

It was on May 1, 1820, when the La Belle Alliance dropped anchor 
in Table Bay, Capetown, South Africa. Due to strict quarantine reg- 
ulations being enforced at Table Bay ( the smallpox epidemic aboard), 
only the Party Leaders were allowed ashore. They brought back word 
that they would proceed immediately to their destination; for it was dan- 
gerous for them to remain any longer at Capetown. 

One of the passengers aboard the La Belle Alliance had been en- 
trusted with a parcel and packet of letters to be delivered to two 
gentlemen in Capetown. Being unable to leave the ship they were 
unable to personally deliver them, so they had to send them ashore by 
another messenger. In payment for this service the two Cape Town 
gentlemen sent them a thank you letter together with two live sheep 
and a large bucket of onions. 

For days thereafter, one of the main topics of discussion was 
about the large fat tails of these special breed of sheep. Some expres- 
sed their opinion that they might be a cross mixture with an otter; 
both having such large, fat tails. Others had the theory that these 
sheep, grazing on Table Mountain, with their heads higher than their 
tails, resulted in the surplus fat flowing to the lowest point, their 
tails. But the greatest satisfaction came when the sheep were butch- 
ered and fresh meat distributed to many of this young man's friends. 
This was really a rare treat for all, after having only salt beef and 
pork for the past six months. 

Finally, Cape Recife was rounded and at about 11:00 a.m. .Wed- 
nesday May 24, 1820, the La Belle Alliance dropped anchor in Algoa 
Bay. As the Boardman family stood on deck and looked out on the 
dreary, barren, sand swept coastline , they felt they had arrived at the 
"Cape of Forlorn Hope", rather than the Cape of Good Hope. On this 
barren looking shoreline, which was later to become Port Elizabeth, 
they could see only three houses, a few haystacks, and a great 
number of tents, placed there by the British Government as temp- 



REV. WILLIAM BOARDMAN 



47 



orary quarters for the Settlers, enroute to their new homes. One of 
the Settlers describes this picture as follows: "From the deck of our 
vessel we descried a coast lashed by a broad belt of angry breakers, 
threatening, we feared, death to a large proportion of our numbers. 
The shore was girt with an array of barren sand hills, behind and 
close to which appeared a series of rugged and stony acclivities, and 
in the distance behind these, the dark and gloomy range of the Winter- 
hood Mountains frowned upon us. " 

Upon the invitation of the Captain, the Rev. William Boardman 
and Thos. Willson, the Party Head, were the first to go ashore from 
the La Belle Alliance. Here they reported to the kind hearted and 
fatherly, Sir Rufane Donkin, the acting Governor of the Colony, who 
had his headquarters' tent (Marques) at the spot near the end of the 
present Jetty Street, Port Elizabeth. 

The next day, word was sent back to the ship to send in the Porter 
dogs and guns and ammunition; for the advance Party was going hunt- 
ing for game. In the afternoon this advance party returned with their 
game - 3 plovers, 2 water wagtails, 1 hare, and 1 long snake (fully 
18 inches) which was said to be very deadly poisonous. In describ- 
ing the natives they had seen, the Rev. Boardman remarked that all 
the hair they had on their heads was for all the world like rows of 
young York cabbages. 

Many of the Settlers who had arrived on other vessels, were 
still occupying the tents of "Settlers Town" which were located along 
the shore and behind the sand hills. They were waiting for the trans- 
portation which would carry them to their new location in Zuurveld, 
about 100 miles up country. Since the tents were still occupied, all 
on board the La Belle Alliance were required to stay aboard the ship 
for another week or two. How disappointing this was for them; to be 
so near their destination, yet unable to go ashore. 

On about June 1, 1820, all the boxes, bags and baggage of the 
Boardman family were loaded into a large barge, or lighter. These 
surf boats were worked in toward shore by ropes, until shallow water 
was reached. Here the Scots of the 72nd Regiment, then stationed at 
Fort Frederick, were on hand to carry the women and children to 
shore. All others had to wade to shore or be carried on the backs of 
natives. All boxes, bags and baggage was piled on the shore, to be 
recovered and carried to the assigned Government tents along the 
shoreline . 

Of particular interest was the tenderness shown by the Comman- 
dant of Algoa Bay, a member of the 72nd Regiment, Captain Evatt. 
He was a fine old officer, with a head-like snow, standing knee deep 
in the water when the boat carrying Mrs. Bradley and her child came 
to shore. He waded to the boat, then carefully as any father, picked 



48 



REV. WILLIAM BOARDMAN 



up the child and carried her to the dry shore. One of his soldiers 
carried Mrs. Bradley ashore. As they arrived on the dry beach, and 
upon putting the child down, Capt. Evatt remarked to the Mother, 
"There, my lass, ther's your child". Then away into the surf he wad- 
ed for another precious cargo. 

For the next 34 days, members of the Willson Party were requir- 
ed to live in "Settlers Town", the Government tents pitched along the 
shore of the future town of Port Elizabeth. The wagons and oxen which 
were hired by the Government from the Dutch families of the area to 
transport the Settlers to their new location, were insufficient to 
handle such a large group of Settlers all at one time. The Govern- 
ment had planned on each Settler's vessel arriving at from two to 
three week intervals, thereby allowing each vessel to unload and all 
persons to be transported to their destination before another vessel 
arrived at the Bay. The delay caused by the ice freezing closing the 
Thames River in England; troubles encountered by the vessels on the 
way; some ships making much better time, due to more favorable 
winds and sailing conditions; all contributed to the arrival of the ships 
in Algoa Bay at about the same time. 

After such a disappointing introduction to the shores of South 
Africa, the Boardman children could hold their curiosity no longer 
and inquired of their father if their new home was going to be a barren 
and desolate waste and swampland, as they were now camped in. He 
then gathered them all around him and described some of the beauti- 
ful country and sights they would see - something they had never seen 
or even dreamed of; such as a wilderness of wild flowers of brilliant 
and delicate colors; they would see Aloes plants with its scarlet 
blossoms that stood like soldiers on the hillside; they would see thou- 
sands of snowy backed Springbok gracefully bounding away on the 
plains; they would pass through the hills where they could hear the 
lions and tigers roar and the baboon shrieking and shouting their dis- 
pleasure of the intruders. They would be terrified by the howl and 
laughter of the hyena, and the shrill yell of the jackel. They would 
see the long legged ostrich go galloping over the veldt, with their 
ruffled plumes waiving in the breeze. They would see the horned 
crowned Hartebeeste and the galloping Guagges. Near the river rav- 
ines they might even see a ferocious rhinocerus or croccodile. 

According to the schedule they would leave the "Settler Tent Town" 
Port Elizabeth and go as far as the Swartkops River, about 8 miles, 
the first day. Then on to the Couga River, am next cross the Sunday 
River; climb Addo Hill, then through Addo Bush (elephant country) 
across the Quaggas Flat and scale Bushman's River Heights, after 
crossing the Bushman River. At Assegai Bush the trail would divide; 
the north trail continuing for another 20 miles to Grahamstown, and 



REV. WILLIAM BOARDMAN 



49 



the northeast trail going for about 35 miles to Bathurst. The Willson 
Party land grant lay between the plains of Waay-Plaats and the Kowie 
Bush or halfway between Bathurst and Grahamstown. 

This journey to their new location was full of wonder and excite- 
ment for the Boardman Family. On July 4, 1820, the Willson Party 
started out with 60 wagons loaded with their worldly possessions. 
What a sight to see - - - the wagon train with its long span of long 
horned oxen; the dark skinned, half naked, impish looking native lead- 
er;the uncouth and strange yells of the drivers as he called directions 
to the oxen and cracked his monstrous whip. 

The wild and desolate country, though beautiful in many parts, 
was a source of delight to the Boardman Children, but was a source 
of worry, care and despondency to the mothers and fathers of the 
Party. 

At night all the oxen were taken out of their yokes and driven 
away to feed in the nearby meadows, then later brought back and tied 
to the yokes for the remainder of the night. Plenty of firewood was 
gathered by the Hottentot servants to keep the fires burning all night. 

On the 4th day out, the Boardman children received a most val- 
uable lesson as the company stopped at the location of some of the 
newly arrived Settlers. One of the families was in a state of extreme 
distress, for one of their 12 year old girls had been bitten by a puff 
adder snake, and had died very soon after. The snake had been kill- 
ed but so had this little Settler girl. This incident so impressed them 
that the advice given them to always walk where they could see, where 
they were stepping and to always carry a cane or stick for protection, 
was never forgotten the rest of their lives. One of the older 72nd 
Regiment soldiers, who was acting as an escort for the party, then 
told them about the treatment that had long been used by the Dutch 
farmers, when one was bitten by a poisonous snake. He told them 
a knife or some sharp object should be used in scarifying the bite, to 
the point of making it bleed, then to take a young fowl or pigeon, pull 
the feathers off its breast and scarify it to the point of bleeding and 
then lay it on the bleeding snake bite. Soon the fowl or pigeon would 
die. This process should be repeated until the fowl or pigeon did not 
die. The patient was then safe and would recover. 

In addition to the puff adder, two other deadly poisonous snakes 
found in this area were the cobra and black mamba. There were 
many python or boa constrictor snakes who obtained their prey by 
wrapping around and squeezing their victims to death, before swall- 
owing them whole. 

On about the 12th of July, the Boardman Family arrived at their 
new home, within a few miles of the future town of Bathurst. After 
more than 165 days of traveling they had at last arrived at their new 



50 



REV. WILLIAM BOARDMAN 



home. A tent was pitched and all of their boxes, baggage, tables, 
chairs, and provisions were unloaded from the wagon. The Dutch 
farmer then yoked up his oxen and together with their Hottentot serv- 
ants, bade farewell to the Boardmans and moved off to their farms 
and homes to the West. 

In Hockly's "History of the 1820 Settlers" he states the Rev. 
Boardman was officially appointed Minister to the Willson Party in 
July 1820. 

On the following Sunday the Rev. William Boardman, with the 
help of members of the Settlement, had erected a (Marquee) tent in 
which to hold Church Services. Having no bell to call the people to 
worship, he suspended a pit saw to the branch of a tree and at the de- 
sired time he would strike it with a piece of iron. Thus the Settlers 
were called to worship in their new country, where they could offer 
their thanks and gratitude for their safe arrival. 

In a sermon delivered by Dr. Talmadge he referred to the Rev. 
William Boardman as follows: "What I saw at Bethsan". "While the 
religious service was going on, the Rev. Boardman, glorious man! 
Since dead, was telling the scores of sick people present that Christ 
was there as of old to heal all diseases, and that if they would only 
believe, their sickness would depart. I saw a woman near me, with 
hand and arm twisted of rheumatism, and her wrist was fiery with 
inflamation, and it looked like those cases of chronic rheumatism 
which we have all seen and sympathized with, cases beyond all human 
healing. At the preacher's repeating this: "Will you believe? Do you 
believe? Do you believe now?" I heard the poor sick woman say, with 
emphasis which sounded throughout the building, "I do believe!" and 
then she laid her twisted arm and handout as straight as your arm and 
hand, or mine. If I had seen her rise from the dead, I would have not 
been more thrilled. Since then I believe that God will do anything in 
answer to prayer and in answer to our faith. " 

As the "Voortrekers" wagons pulled out of view, what a forlorn 
sight the Boardman Family presented - here they were sitting on top 
of their boxes and bags and baggage - their only worldly possessions - 
and now with the departure of the Dutch farmers - they were cut off 
from all communication with the rest of the world. 

Soon, all around, there was a commotion of activity as the indiv- 
idual family tents were erected and the night fires were lighted around 
them to scare off any wild beast who might appear during the night. 

The next day came the selection of land sites - land which was to 
be their very own - something many of them had never experienced - 
and what a variety of choices it was. For the more practical, they 
examined and chose the sites with the very best soil, for they knew 
the crops they raised was to be their support and livelihood. The 



REV. WILLIAM BOARDMAN 



51 



nervous father chose the location which would be most easily defend- 
ed against the natives and wild animals and against floods. The art- 
istically minded sought the picuresque spots, often overlooking the 
accessibility of water. Others took what was given them or what was 
left. 

The next few years were extremely busy ones for the Boardman 
Family. Of foremost importance was the building of a house and a 
home to live in, which was begun immediately. 

William Boardman, soon after becoming settled on his new loca- 
tion, attempted to convert the veld and bush to farm land and at the 
same time act as a Minister and administer to the spiritual needs of 
the Party; act as teacher and contribute to the educational require- 
ments of the young people; assume the responsibility as head of the 
Willson Party, after Mr. Thomas Willson abandoned his Party, the 
Settlement and South Africa. Mr. Willson was forced to flee to Port 
Elizabeth and later to England, due to his domineering and tactless 
proceedure in dealing with members of his Party. His departure left 
all of his accumulated troubles, failures and responsibilities to his 
logical successor - The Rev. William Boardman. 

Upon assuming leadership of this large party (307 persons) he 
soon found the duties and responsibilities were so many, in addition 
to his own troubles as a farmer, that there was little time to devote 
to the spiritual welfare of his flock. Under these circumstances he 
found it necessary to resign his position as Minister. In 1825 he 
was again appointed as Minister and Master of the new Grammar 
School at Bathurst. At this time the building originally intended as 
the drostdy was utilized as the first school. This old edifice is still 
standing and is one of the most imposing private residence in Bathurst. 
He was also in control of another smaller school built at Cuylerville. 
In 18 32-18 34, the Bathurst school was run by W.J. Earle. (The hus- 
band of William Boardman' s eldest daughter, Mary. ) 

But along with the happiness, success and pleasures came the 
heartbreaks, the sorrows and disappointments. The first few weeks 
after arrival, the Settlers cleared the land, plowed and planted it with 
wheat and vegetable seeds. This was to furnish them with not only 
food for the year, but seed for the next year's plantings. For three 
years the wheat crop was a complete failure, due to the "rust" 
blight. The vegetables did not thrive and mature as they should, and 
the Settlers and their property was harrassed by the nearby natives. 
Time after time, cattle and sheep which was purchased from the 
Dutch farmers, were driven off and killed by the natives or the wild 
animals of the area. In the year 1822 no less than 2,590 horses and 
cattle were stolen, 778 being recovered. In 1823 there were 2,136 
head stolen and 526 recovered. 

So numerous were the jobs to be done on this frontier farm that 



52 



REV. WILLIAM BOARDMAN 



all members of the family had to pitch in and help. Even the young- 
est boys of the Party had to take their turns herding the cattle and 
horses on the nearby veldt. In August of 1823 two of James and Will- 
iam Boardman's herding companions were murdered while herding 
the cattle and horses belonging to the Willson Party. The loss was 
felt keenly by the Boardman Family, both to the Party they headed 
and as companions and playmates to their younger boys. The loss 
of the cattle to the Kaffirs were replaceable , but the lives of these two 
little boys aged 8 and 11 years could never be substituted. 

In the year 1823 many homes had been erected, fences built and 
gardens and farms planted. The crop failures had been a great dis- 
appointment and hardship, but to top it all off, cloudbursts of rain 
came, washing away and destroying many homes as well as the crops, 
cattle and personal belongings. 

That year the good people of Cape Town heard about their unfort- 
unate circumstances so they put on a drive to raise cash and commod- 
ities to send to the unfortunate Settlers in the Albany District. Even 
the people in far away India took up a subscription for the relief of the 
South African Settlers. 

It was in the year 1822 that Mary, the eldest Boardman daughter 
married William John Earl, a member of the Willson Party, who was 
building a farm and home in nearby Beaufort Vale. 

Fron Blackburn, England came the word that Thomas, the uphol- 
sterer apprentice, who had remained in England, was married to 
Jane Fuenilove during the year 1823. 

The next year, 18 24, the greatest sadness and heartache to all 
members of the Boardman Family, came with the death of their dear 
Mother, Margaret Hayes Boardman, at the age of 44. About two years 
later, in September 1827, the Father, Rev. William Boardman, 
Rector of Bathurst, Master of Grammar School, First Colonial Min- 
ister and 1820 Settler, died at the age of 51 years. 

SONG OF THE EARLY SETTLERS 
"Never despair! tho 1 the harvest fail; 
Tho' the hosts of a savage foe assail 
Never despair! We shall conquer yet! 
And the toils of our earlier years forget. 
In Hope's bright glory our sun shall set, 
Mids't Afric's Southern Wilds. " 

During the year 1825, Sarah, just having turned nineteen, was 
married to John Crause, a British Army Captain; who was stationed 
at the Army Garrison in Grahamstown. 

John Henry Dixon, head of the Dixon Party of 1820 Settlers, 



REV. WILLIAM BOARDMAN 



53 



married the second eldest daughter, Judith Boardman, during the year 
1826 at Grahamstown. 

In 1827, John Ashton Boardman died at the age of twenty-three. 
Sussanah married Thomas Jarman of Clumbers in 1832. October of 
1833, William Boardman II married Mary Caldecott, daughter of Dr. 
Philip Caldecott. 

February 17, 1834, James Hayes Boardman married Elizabeth 
Dixie in St. George Church, Grahamstown, daughter of Philip Dixie, 
a 1820 Settler. 

Margaret married William Smith, a land surveyor in 1843. He 
was from Grahamstown. 

THE SONG OF THE EARLY SETTLERS CHILDREN 

" Our toilworn fathers have sunk to the rest, 
But their sons shall inherit their hope's bequest. 
Valleys are smiling in harvest pride; 
There are fleecy flocks on the mountain side; 
Cities are rising to stud the plains; 
The life blood of commerce is coursing the veins 
Of a new born Empire, that grows and reigns 
O'er Afric's Southern Wilds." 

Although he did not live to a ripe old age and accumulate great 
physical wealth; WILLIAM BOARDMAN left to his large family a life 
of sacrifice, service and devotion to Education, His Church; His 
Settler Friends and to His Country. He was a Pioneer Leader in all- 
ways . 



Clarence Dixon Taylor 
Provo, Utah 
April I960 



EXTRACTS FROM BOARDMAN BIBLE IN POSSESSION 
OF PHILIP WILLIAM BOARDMAN 



FAMILY REGISTER 



Of the Rev. William Boardman (son of Thomas Boardman of Hol- 
brook Hall and Ashton Manor, Lancashire) M. A. 1st Colonial 
Chaplain, and his wife Margaret Boardman, born Hayes, who were 
married in 1794, came out with the Settlers of 1820 in "La Belle 
Alliance" as Head of Wilson's Party), and had the following children: 



1. Mary, born at Newberry, Lancashire, 5 October 1795. 

2. Judith, born at Newberry, Lancashire, 16 December 1796. 

3. Susannah, born at Newberry, Lancashire, 27 October 1798. 

4. Thomas, born at Newberry, Lancashire, 25 September 1800. 

5. Margaret, born at Newton, 14 December 1802. 

6. John Ashton, born at Newton, 8 July 1804. 

7. Sarah Hayes, born at Newton, 3 August 1806. 

8. James Hayes, born at Newton, 22 July 1808. 

9. William, born at Blackburn, 14 February 1811. 



Mary, married Wm. Jno. Earle in 1822, Wilson's Party, Beaufort Vale. 
Judith, married John Henry Dixon, 1826 of Waaiplaats. 
Susannah, married Thomas Jarman, 1832 of Clumber. 
Thomas, remained at Blackburn, married Jane Fuenilove 18 23. 
Margaret, married Wm. Smith, land surveyor, Grahamstown 1843. 
John Ashton, died at Grahamstown, 1827. Age 23. 
Sarah Hayes, married John Crause, Army Captain, 1825. 
James Hayes, married Elizabeth Dixie, 1834. 

William, married Mary, daughter of Dr. Caldecott, October 1833. 

Rev'd. William Boardman, died at Bathurst in 1827. 
Margaret Boardman, born Hayes, died at Bathurst in 1824. 
Susannah, died at Peddie, 8th February 1859. 
Margaret, died at Adelaide, 5th 1869. 

Daughter of Mary (Miss Earle) married Richard Read of Aliwal 
North. 



( Copied from the 1820 Settlers Archives, Capetown, Union of 
South Africa, by Clarence D. Taylor on January 23, 1933. ) 



54 



HENRI ALDOUS DIXON 
1835 - 1884- 




CAPE OF GOOD HOPE MISSION 
(SOUTH AFRICAN MISSION ) 



Five years after the first band of Mormon Pioneers entered 
the Great Salt Lake Valley, President Brigham Young called Elders 
Jesse Haven, Leonard I. Smith, and William H. Walker to go to 
far away South Africa and preach the Gospel of Jesus Christ. They 
made their way to England where they boarded a sailing vessel on 
February 1 1, 1853 and after sixty- seven days arrived at Cape Town, 
South Africa on April 1 9, 1853. 

Immediately upon their arrival at Cape Town they made applica- 
tion and were granted permission to use the Town Hall, in which to 
hold meeting for six consecutive nights, on the condition they pay 
for the lighting of the Hall. They immediately made posters adver- 
tising these meetings and hung them in conspicuous places about 
Town. Some hand bills were distributed to advertize and invite the 
townspeople to attend their meetings. On their first evening, April 
25th, the hall was nearly filled. Elder Haven was the first speaker, 
addressing the audience upon the First Principles of the Gospel. He 
was followed by Elder Leonard I Smith who bore a powerful testi- 
mony of the divine mission of the Prophet Joseph Smith. At this, 
some of the listeners became so excited that it was impossible to 
continue the rmeeting because of the confusion. The following even- 
ing the three Elders found the hall closed to them. They were able 
to obtain other halls to meet in, but mobs caused so much con- 
fusion it was impossible to speak. Many of the Preachers and 
Ministers of the area delivered lectures and sermons in opposition 
to the teachings of the Latte r- Day-Saint Elders. Some even went 
as far as to prohibit their members from talking to the missionaries 
or accepting literature from them. In spite of the falsehoods and the 
opposition, friends were raised up who accepted the truths of the 
Gospel message and desired baptism; however they were afraid to 
take a decided stand. 

Elder Walker wrote in his journal, "The Clergy and Ministers 
went from house to house telling the people not to admit us or give 
us anything to eat, using all their influence and power to starve us 
out of the country. We lived a week at a time without anything to 
eat, distributing tracts, etc". 

On a rainy, windtossed night in May while Elder Walker was 
taking a short trip into the country, he knocked on the door of Mr. 
Charles Rawlinson, seeking a place to stay for the night. 

Mr. Rawlinson admitted him to the house, let him warm him- 
self, and introduced him to his building business partner, Nicholas 
Paul. 



5.5 



l6 CAPE OF GOOD HOPE MISSION 

Apologetically, Mr. Rawlinson explained he could not house him 
for the night because of small living quarters. 

Elder Walker had walked all day without anything to eat, this 
was his seventeenth attempt to find lodgings that evening. As Elder 
Walker was preparing to leave, Nicholas Paul stood up, "you had 
better come with me young man",he saidand led him a short distance 
to the Paul home where Mrs. Paul built up a fire to warm the strang- 
er and dry his clothes. Although it was after nine o'clock at night, 
she set about preparing a warm supper for him. 

This was perhaps, the first real glimmer of hope in the opening 
of the missionary work in South Africa. The three Elders had re- 
ceived continual disappointment for their first months labors. 

Elder Walker returned to Capetown the following day and the 
three Elders, on May twenty- third, according to established custom, 
climbed to the top of a mountain called "Lion's Head" and organized 
a branch of the Church with Elder Haven as President. 

About a week later, Elder Walker returned to Mowbray where 
Nicholas Paul offered his home for a meeting place. At the first 
meeting held in his home, he informed all present that if they did 
not want to listen to the Mormon Elders they were invited to leave, 
but the first man who insulted his guests and friends or Elders 
would be in danger of "having more holes through them than a 
skimmer". The services proceeded without incident, and meetings 
were held there regularly from that time on. Without such a stal- 
wart friend, it is no wonder that in later years the South African 
Mission Headquarters, the Mission Home and beautiful new Chapel 
and Recreation Hall were located at Mowbray. 

Just two months after the Elders arrival in Cape Town, on 
June 15, 1853, Elder Leonard I. Smith baptized Henry Stringer 
at Mowbray. He was the first Mormon Convert in South Africa, 
the first fruits of the labors of the first Mormon Elders in this new 
vineyard, South Africa. 

On June 23, 1853, Elder William H. Walker baptized their loyal 
and valiant friend, Mr. Nicholas Paul of Mowbray. This was the 
second baptism in the Cape of Good Hope Mission. The following 
day Mrs. Paul and others were baptized. Six months after the 
arrival of the Elders in Cape Town, they had baptized 45 persons, 
organized two branches, and blessed a number of children. The 
Branches located around Cape Town were organized into the Cape 
Conference or District. 

A Branch was organized at Beaufort by Elder William H. 
Walker in February 23, 1854. Elder Leonard I. Smith was doing 
a good work at Port Elizabeth. He had baptized several members, 
but had not as yet completely organized a branch owing to the 



CAPE OF GOOD HOPE MISSION 



57 



scattered condition of the converts. Later a flourishing Branch 
was established at Port Elizabeth. 

It was in the year 1854 that Henry A. Dixon of Uitenhage, and 
recently from Grahamstown, then a boy of nineteen years of age, 
was attracted by the teachings of these Mormon Elders (specifically 
Elder Leonard I. Smith) and was taught the Gospel of Jesus Christ. 
He accepted it as the only True Church. Having not attained his 
majority, he was prohibited by his father to join this Church, 
with the threat that if he did join he would be cut off without a shill- 
ing inhe ritance . He promised his father he would not join the Mormon 
Church before he was twenty-one years of age. This promise he 
kept On the day of his twenty-first birthday, March 14, 1856, 
he was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- 
Day Saints , at Uitenhage, by John Elliston, a local member who 
held the office of a Priest. Three days later upon the request of 
his father he left his home at Uitenhage and went to Port Elizabeth 
where he worked for eight and one half months to get sufficient 
money to emigrate to Utah. 

At a Conference held at Port Elizabeth on August 13, 1855, the 
Cape of Good Hope Mission, later the South African Mission, con- 
sisted of 3 Conferences, 6 Branches and a total membership of 126 
me mbe r s . 

As the Church membership grew and more members became 
interested in emmigrating to Utah, the demand for steerage passage 
was greater than the existing supply. Two members of the 
Church, John Stock of Port Elizabeth and Charles Roper of Beau- 
fort purchased a sailing vessel, the "Unity", for the purpose of 
providing passageway for the Saints, as well as to haul cargo. 

On November 27, 1855, Elders William H.Walker and Leonard 
I. Smith sailed from Port Elizabeth on the "Unity" accompanied by 
fifteen emmigrating Saints bound for Zion. 

On December 25, 1855, Elder Jesse Haven left Cape Town with 
a small Company of Saints en route to Salt Lake City, Utah. At that 
time 176 persons had been baptized in the whole Colony. Some Saints 
emmigrated and some had been excommunicated, leaving only 121 
Saints in the Colony, following Elder Haven's departure. 

A local Elder, Edward Slaughter, was left in charge of the 
Latter Day Saints in Port Elizabeth, and local Elder Richard Provis 
in the Cape Conference. 

It was on November 1, 1856 that Henry A. Dixon left Port 
Elizabeth bound for the Great Salt Lake Valley, via London, England, 
on board the Brig "Unity". 

Two years later in the fall of 1857, Elder Ebenezer C. Richard- 
son was sent from the British Mission to preside over the "Cape of 
Good Hope Mission". He was accompanied by Elder James Brooks. 



58 



CAPE OF GOOD HOPE MISSION 



As is usually the case when the Elders are absent for any length of 
time, the newly arrived missionaries found the Church in South 
Africa in a somewhat unsatisfactory condition, although the presiding 
Elders had labored with great fidelity. When Elders Richardson and 
Brooks left for home in the Spring of 1858, the Church in South Africa 
had a membership of 243 members. At that time Elder Richard 
Provis still presided over the Cape Conference and Elder John Stock 
was President of the Eastern Province Conference. 

In March 185 9, thirty Saints emmigrating to Zion, left Port 
Elizabeth on the ship "Alacrity", in charge of Elder Joseph R. 
Humphreys . 

In the diary of Henry A. Dixon under date of July 1, 1860, en- 
route back to his birthplace, South Africa from Salt Lake City, Utah, 
he writes: "Arrived at Florence (Nebraska). Found several, over 
80 African Saints". 

"August 24, 1860, rec'd. a letter from Bro Cannon, dated 17th 
July. The African Saints were camped about 3 miles from Florence, 
expected to start on the 18th. " 

On December 15, 1861 Elders William Fotheringham, Henry A. 
Dixon, John Talbot, and Martin Zyderlaan, missionaries from Utah, 
arrived at Cape Town. The following exerpt was taken from the Jan. 
7, 1862 issue of the Cape Argus: 

"ARRIVAL OF MORMON PREACHERS FOR THE CAPE" 

"Four preachers have just arrived in this Colony from Utah, 
with a view of promulgating Mormon doctrines, and winning converts 
to the Mormon faith. Two of the preachers are natives of Grahams- 
town, who have been dwellers in Utah, and who have returned to 
convert the colonial born. Their names are: John Talbot and Henry 
Dixon. A Hollander named Martin Zyderlaan, also from the lake, 
is to preach in Dutch, and convert the Dutch population. William 
Fotheringham, a Scotchman born, but now like the other three, 
a Mormon Preacher and a a citizen of the United States, and 
direct from Utah, is we understand, the leader. He assures us that 
the stories promulgated here, said to be by persons, who have been 
disappointed after going over, are utterly untrue. He says all who 
have gone over are happy and prosperous, as is the State of Utah 
gene rally. 

He represents the soil as less fertile th an some of the United 
States, but he says it yields in abundance, and hemmed in as the 
Mormon People are by the hills, they live in peace and Prosperity, 
and no one can molest them from without, of the truth of the Pro- 
phets revelation we adduce the following: ( A Revelation and Pro- 
phecy by the Prophet, Seer, and Revelator Joseph Smith, given 
Dec. 25, 1832. ) 



CAPE OF GOOD HOPE MISSION 



59 



This pamphlet entitled the Pearl of Great Price, published 1851 
by Joseph Smith, first Prophet, Seer, and Revelator of the Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and is said to be verified by 
the war now raging in America. Utah, Mr. Fotheringham states 
stands by the Union and will be prepared to pay its quota towards 
carrying on the war. 

Utah situated 1032 miles from the frontier boundry, will be tax- 
ed willingly for the war and will stand by the Constitution to the last". 
(Copied from Cape Argus, Jan. 7, 1862. Published by W. R. Murry) 

Henry A. Dixon reports in his diary under the date of March 28, 
1861: "Received letters from Pres. Fotheringham, Port Elizabeth. 
The war still raging in America. Substance of letters: William 
Fotheringham' s - - was busy with emmigration. Bro. Slaughter 
has heard from his son, all peaceful in Zion. On the 14th inst. , the 
English Barque Rowena sailed down Algoa Bay for New York having 
on board 15 of the Saints under charge of Bro. Grant D. Mitchell, 
wife and family; Wm. Rose, his mother and brother; Mary Anne 
Taylor, her Sr. Caroline and father; Z. A. Grant & family, have 
had a great deal of trouble with this family through the father's acts. 
Shorts, Swifts and others preparing to leave in the Henry Ellis, in 
charge of Bro. Stock on the 28th. " 

"April 25, 1863. Mail arrived - - -Brother Lloyd writes (from 
G . S. L. City) we are a happy people. Also letters from Brother 
Fotheringham and Talbot. 32 souls left on board the Henry Ellis, 
including Elders Stock & Zyderlaan. The latter's health being bad. 
Amongst that number were Sr. Swift & family; Sr. Short & family; 
Sr. Green & family; Sr. Fotheringham, son & daughter ;William A. 
Francom & etc. . Jas. Green was married to Sr. Legg before 
leaving, by Prest. Fotheringham. " 

Elders Fotheringham, Dixon and Talbot remained in the Cape 
Colony until the spring of 1864. During this two and one-half years 
they had labored, they had considerable success, especially with 
the German and Dutch residents ;but the field was a difficult one and 
little progress could be made. On April 5, 1864, W. Fotheringham 
with a Company of nine members sailed for New York on the ship 
"Echo", and Henry A. Dixon and John Talbot left for New York on 
the ship "Susan Pardue" on April 10, 1864 with a Company of eight- 
een membe rs . 

Elder Minor G. Atwood, a Zion Elder who had been laboring 
for some time in the Mission, succeeded Elder Fotheringham in 
the Presidency of the Mission. He continued to labor for about a 
year and on April 12, 1865 he left Port Elizabeth with a Company of 
47 members of the Church in the Brig "Mexicano" bound for New 
York; this leaving the Mission in charge of local Saints. 



60 



CAPE OF GOOD HOPE MISSION 



Elder Edward Slaughter of Port Elizabeth, writing under date 
of July 8, 1866 wrote: "Our Colony is in a miserable condition - - 
the work of the Lord is at a standstill here. Many are, however, 
satisfied of the truth of "Mormonism" , but are unwilling to surrend- 
er the opinions and praise of men for the favor and praise of God. " 

It was nearly forty years before the South African Mission was 
re-opened. On July 25, 1903, Elders Warren H. Lyons, William 
R. Smith, Thomas L. Griffiths and George A. Simpkins arrived in 
Cape Town to re-open a Latter Day Saint Mission in that part of 
the world. In spite of the long lapse of years they found a few 
scattered members. This showed that the seed sown by the former 
missionaries still bore fruit, and that at no time since the Mission 
was opened in 1853 had the Cape of Good Hope and the surrounding 
district been without at least a few members of the Church. 

Where formerly the Missionaries advocated and encouraged 
the Members of the Church to immigrate to Zion , the Church 
Leaders now advised the Members to stay at home and to build up 
a strong and healthy and useful Church membership in their native 
Country. 



HENRY A. DIXON'S CONVERSION TO THE GOSPEL 
Of Jesus Christ Of Latter Day Saints 

When about fifteen years of age I went as a volunteer under 
Sir Geo. Cathcar of (Balackla) (noteriety). He having fallen in 
that memorable battle whilst leading the charge was then Governor 
of the Cape. We followed the enemy into Kerlies Country, beyond 
the confines of British Territory. - - -Ten thousand head of cattle 
were captured. My share of the prize money amounting to several 
pounds. I deposited it in a savings bank, which came in very op- 
portune in defraying expenses of my immigration to England - — 
- - -After my return from this expedition, my parents removed to 
Uitenhage, 100 miles distant near Algoa Bay, or Port Elizabeth. 
I accompanied them. Whilst here I first heard the sound of the 
Everlasting Gospel as taught in these latter days. Elder Leonard 
I. Smith of Salt Lake City being the first person to instruct me in 
these principles. I was about nineteen years of age, a staunch 
Episcopalian. My ancestors for several generations being of this 
faith. I well remember the first meeting I attended, a few persons 
assembled in a private house, accompanied by a companion of 
mine, the son of a Clergyman of the Episcopal Church. Elder 
Smith was preaching. The first feeling manifest was one of sym- 
pathy for the Elder, so far from home, family and friends; in a 
distant land; his lot cast amongst strangers with an unpopular 
doctrine, shouted after False Prophet, Seven Wives & etc. ; no 
salary; traveling without purse or script. Myself and companion 
felt like assisting him. After listening to his discourse on the 
first principles, I felt that it was the Truth and formed a resolve 
to embrace it when of age and gather with the Saints. I quit going 
to Church and attended regularly the meetings of the Saints. Was 
subject to taunts and jeers of my companions; was called names 
and etc. Icontinued in this condition for about two years , assailed 
by ministers and members of nearly every sect; the Episcopalians, 
Baptists, Swendenborgians , New Israilit es , Saints of Latter Days 
or Plymouth Brethren & etc. 

The Lord blessed me abundantly, so that I could readily con- 
found them. Tracts published against us were sent to me by Min- 
isters and others. I received letters from a distance of those in- 
terested in my welfare, warning me of this "Delusion" as they 
termed it, but all to no purpose. I read the Voice of Warning, 
compared its teachings with the Bible. Prayed earnestly, for a 
knowledge, obtained it. On the day I became twenty- one, I was 
baptized by Priest John Ellitson on the 14th March 1855, no Elder 
being present. The same evening in company with some others. 
I felt as Solomon has said, "Hope deferred maketh the heart sick, 



61 



62 



HENRY A. DIXON'S CONVERSION 



but when the desire cometh it is a tree of life". I felt a new man; 
realized my sins were forgiven. The Saints met in the next house, 
expecting me to be turned out. I repaired home with my wet 
bundle, my parents realizing what was done. My Father inform- 
ed me in as much as I had gone in direct opposition to their wish- 
es I must try the world. The youngest of the family, never having 
been away from home for any length of time; their hopes - - - - - 



(The remainder was never found. ) 



'THE TESTIMONY OF A PIONEER 



He walked slowly but firmly up the steps that lead to the pul- 
pit. His manner was sure . . . cautious . . . and with determin- 
ation. As he approached the rostrum in the center of the Chapel, 
you could almost feel the humility and sincerity that radiated from 
his person. The slight smile on his face, the brightness of his 
eyes and the glow of his countenance made you feel good inside. 

Everyone loved and respected Brother Dixon . . .He had ser- 
ved his community well and had been a friend to all. Yes, he had 
served his God with all the power he could gather. He was now 
approaching the eve of his mortal existence, but he still had the 
vigor of youth in his voice, wisdom of the ages in his thoughts, 
and the determination of the matured in his actions. He could 
hold his own in the paths of jests and wisdom. He could compete 
with the young and old in contests of thought and deed. He was the 
ideal of the community. 

"Dear Brothers and Sisters", he began with the pause for 
thought, but with a full and energetic manner. "I stand before you 
this night an old man, one that has seen mortal life at its fullest 
with its instances of sadness - - - but I stand before you a happy 
and a content man. To those who know not God, to those who un- 
derstand not the ways of righteousness - -I am nearing the end of 
existence. But those who know of the Creator and fully compre- 
hend his purposes, know that I am just about to enter into the 
glories of eternity, regardless of degree or sphere. 

A short pause . . . time to collect his thoughts and to class- 
ify them, and then he continues. "I wasn't born in this valley nor 
among these hills. At one time they were strangers to me . . . 
though there eminates from them a feeling of security and friend- 
ship. No . . . My home wasn't here . . . it was in a far distant 
land. A land of beauty and sunshine. My family were settlers 
there and had established themselves quite securely. " 

Again there was a pause. One that showed that he was car- 
ried back to the days of his youth, when his family resided in a 
small valley just outside the "dorp", as he would call it, Uiten- 
hage , Colony of the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa. The re- 
flections caused a smile to come over his face and happy tones 
ringed in his voice as he continued. 

My father was a stern man, just as most of the patriarchs 
of that day were. We, my brothers and sisters, and I were 
bound by his word. My Mother, who interceded when father 
attempted to inflict punishment, was devoted to her family. There 
was a bond of love existing, especially between my mother, my 
older sister, and I, that gave us peace." 

A short pause for breath and then . . . "However this family 



63 



64 



THE TESTIMONY OF A PIONEER 



unity changed . . . changed when by chance I was walking down a 
street of Port Elizabeth, where I was for a short holiday, and I 
heard a noise of a gathering crowd. Some were hissing and some 
were booing and some yelling for quiet. But above all I could de- 
tect the voice of a young man expounding the principles of a re- 
ligion, which after I had listened, filled my soul with entrancing 
joy. I stayed and learned more of this doctrine . . . this doct- 
rine of Mormonism. " 

"Upon returning home I told my parents of what I had heard, 
but to my sadness they took it lightly, in fact they returned my 
enthusiasm with ridicule. Even my mother and sister were un- 
affected. I continued to study and I learned that this was a doct- 
rine of truth which had been revealed from heaven. I knew that 
I had found the way of salvation. " 

Brother Dixon stopped. In his eyes there were tears and a 
slight quiver in his voice. " I . . . desired to join this group . . 
. but was met with refusal from my parents, and though I begged 
and pleaded the rebukes became stronger . . .until the hatred 
which my father had for my newly found philosophy bursted forth 
in fits of rage. Never-the-less, I remained faithful and when I 
reached the age of twenty-one, I announced to my family that I 
had been baptized into the Kingdom of God. I shall never forget 
the look on my father's face. The blood rushed to his head as 
if to strike, and then gathering his emotions, calmed down. 11 
"This day you have chosen between your family and the filthy 
Mormon lot. You will leave this this house for it is no longer 
your home. The barrier that now exists between you and those 
among whom you were reared cannot continue. Therefore take 
it with you at your earliest convenience." He left the room, 
Mother weeping followed after, screaming for him not to be so 
harsh. " 

"So I left Uitenhage, left the people of South Africa, left a 
land that I loved. Yes, the ties were strong, but with the decis- 
ion my father had rendered, I felt that I could no longer by happy 
there but had to be severed in my search for something greater 
and far more enduring. " 

"I journeyed across the wide expanse of water that separated 
me from those I loved and the Zion of the Latter Day. With a 
few that chose to come with me, I arrived in Liverpool and there 
joined a large Company of Saints that were migrating. We ar- 
rived in Boston, via railway cars to Iowa City. On the way I 
viewed the remains of "Nauvoo the Beautiful" where the destruc- 
tion and persecution was still evident. It was then that I began 
to realize that my sacrifice was not so great. For they had been 



THE TESTIMONY OF A PIONEER 



65 



forsaken by their loved ones, driven from their homes in the 
middle of winter and heaped with persecution that will forever 
leave a black spot on my newly acquired country. " 

" I journeyed across the 1500 miles to Salt Lake City by ox 
wagon, following the path of the exodus of modern Israel escap- 
ing from bondage. All along the way were the graves of men, 
women and children that had died in the great trek for freedom 
of worship. I saw the remains of the resting places of those 
that were trapped in the Willie Handcart Company. I paused be- 
side the big rock that protected them to a certain degree from 
the gales of winter, snow, rain and hail. I was where their 
testimonies were sealed in blood; testimonies of the thing that 
was most dear to them. " 

" I stopped long enough to assemble with the masses outside 
of the Valley, that were ready to protect this hard earned liberty, 
even if it meant death, from the armies of the United States that 
were on their way to exterminate their faith . . . "For which 
martyrs had perished. " By now the testimony of the Divine was 
firmly implanted in my bosom, a testimony for which I would 
gladly die. 11 

" My stay in the fortress in the mountains was glorious. To 
mingle with those of common belief and to be at peace with the 
world was a moment I had dreamed of during the year that it 
took to reach Salt Lake City after leaving the Colony of the Cape 
of Good Hope . 11 

11 My stay here was not long. For I was soon sent to the 
Southern part of the State on a mission to help establish one of 
the many communities that the Saints were settling in. And then, 
I was called by President Brigham Young to return to the land of 
my birth, to my forsaken country to preach the message that had 
brought joy and happiness that I had never known before. 11 

" Yes, I returned to South Africa to preach the Gospel of 
Jesus Christ and once again to see my family that had dis-owned 
me. My mother received me with open arms and my father was 
more friendly, a friendliness that faded from light interest in my 
message to the revival of the hatred that once he had had. He 
gave me to understand that I was to leave . . . saying that if it 
had not been for my mother I would have never stepped across 
the threshold again. So bearing my testimony to the divinity of 
the work with all the power that I had in me, in the name of Jesus 
Christ and in the name of the God of Israel ... I took my leave 
and departed . . .never to see my family again . . .1 felt that I 
had done my duty to them so I served my mission honorably and 
returned home, with the spirit of testimony burning within me. 



66 



THE TESTIMONY OF A PIONEER 



Sorry for those that I had left behind me, yes, but with the know- 
ledge of the eternities that could never be taken from my soul. " 

" For I know that this work has been divinely bestowed upon 
the soul of men. » "FOR THE SPIRIT OF GOD LIKE A FIRE IS 
BURNING, THE LATTER DAY GLORY BEGINS TO COME FORTH. 
THE VISIONS AND BLESSINGS OF OLD ARE RETURNING AND 
THE ANGELS ARE COMING TO VISIT THE EARTH. " 



NOTE: - The person who wrote-up this article is unknown. It 
was obtained by Henry Aldous Dixon II of Ogden, Utah from Bro. 
Archibald F. Bennett; who obtained it from Henry S. Todd in 
June I960; who obtained it at Uitenhage, South Africa in 1954 
from his missionary companion who cannot be identified. 



Clarence Dixon Taylor 1966 



HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



18 3 5 - 18 84 

H enry Aldous Dixon was born on the 14th day of March 1835 
at Grahamstown, Cape of Good Hope, South Africa. He was the 
son of John Henry Dixon, who was born May 28, 1786 at West Ham, 
Essex County, near London, England. His mother was Judith 
Boardman Dixon, who was born December 16, 1796 at Newberry, 
Lancaster, England. Both of these parents were among the early 
Settlers of the Albany District in South Africa. They having emi- 
grated in 1820 from England. 

Henry A. had one full sister, Anne Judith Dixon Hartman,who 
was eight years his elder and very fond of her younger brother, 
even after he had accepted the very unpopular religion of the 
Mormons and migrated to America. Mormonism and 14, 000 
miles was insufficient to destroy this affection of brother and 
sister. She would have joined the new Church in later years had 
it not been for her husband's objection. 

There were also four half sisters and one half brother, all 
older than he and pretty well ma tured by the time he reached sc- 
hool age . 

In his infancy and younger days, much of his care was en- 
trusted to native servants. One of the boy servants who had been 
in the Dixon home for a long time, and who Henry A. had become 
very much attache d;finally left his employment in the Dixon house- 
hold and went back to his native way of life. Instead of making a 
wooden or grass kraal (hut) to live in, he set up housekeeping in 
a cave, not far from the Dixon home. Henry A. thought so much 
of this native servant that he saved his pennies and bought bread 
and cakes and took them out to the old servant in the cave. Through 
the conact with this old servant and many of the other natives in 
the neighborhood, he was able to get a first hand knowledge of 
their living conditions , the ir way of life, habits, dress and customs. 

He was a true lover of nature, spending much of his time on 
the open veldt watching the tree s , admiring the flowers and foliage, 
and studying the habits of the many and varied birds and animals. 

There was one little bird which was of particular interest to 
him. It was called the "honey bird". When the natives would see 
this little bird flying about them, twittering and using other 
means to attract their attention, they would obtain a bucket or 
container, together with some kind of weapon, and then follow the 
little bird. Sometimes the bird would lead them to an old hollow 
tree full of honey, where they would fill their containers. Other 



67 



68 



HENRY A. DIXON 



times they would lead to a dangerous snake or animal, which the 
birds were frightened of and wanted the natives to kill. Whenever 
the natives found honey, they always left the tree trunk so the 
little birds could get into the honey, or they hung up a cake of the 
honey in the nearby tree or bush for the bird to feast on. That is 
why they were called "honey birds. " 

At the age of fourteen years he entered an Agency Office as a 
collector and copying clerk. He became an excellent penman, and 
not only with his right hand, but equally as proficient with his left 
hand. In his diary the only way one could tell which hand he was 
writing with was by the slant of his words. When one hand became 
tired of writing, he could shift his pen to the other hand and con- 
tinue his writing. 

One of his chief delights in his later years, was the drawing 
of all kinds of pictures of animals, birds, natives, trees, houses 
and most everything, on the nail of his thumb. The children from 
all over the neighborhood would sit by the hours and watch him 
draw these thumbnail sketche s and listen to his fascinating stories 
of Africa. Two of these stories, as told to his daughters Maria 
and Sarah, when they were little girls went as follows: 

The natives frequently captured boa constrictors in the fol- 
lowing way - A small goat would be tethered to a tree in the jun- 
gle where the big snakes were know to be. As soon as the boa 
attacked and swallowed the goat he would go into a torpid stupor. 

The natives would then approach him with a long pole and lay 
it alongside the snake, lashing his body to it. They could then 
hoist it to their shoulders and carry it to a cage for keeping until 
they could sell it to the whites. 

The early Settlers had a hard time to keep their crops from 
being stolen by the thousands of monkeys which inhabited the 
trees around the clearings. 

They frequently captured them in the following manner: 
A squash would be hollowed out and filled with grain. A small 
opening would be made in the sides of the squash just large enough 
for a monkey to see through and which he could thrust his paws. 

The monkey would reach into the squash and get a fist full of 
grain. Being a greedy creature he would not release the grain, 
even when approached by the Settlers, and could not withdraw his 
paw while clenched around the booty. 

After Henry left the Agency, he served for some time in a 
retail and wholesale store. Afterwards he worked for a few years 
at blacksmithing and wagonmaking. 



HENRY A. DIXON 



69 



Incidents in the travels and observations of Henry A. Dixon as 
a young man in South Africa were recorded by him as follows: 

"When about 15 years of age I went as a volunteer under Sir 
Geo. Cathcar of (Balackla) (notoriety). He having fallen in that 
memorable battle whilst leading the charge, was Governor of the 
Cape. We followed the enemy into Kerlies Country, beyond the 
confines of British Territoy. It was a motley group of about 
7,000 men and English Regular Soldiers, volunteer Dutch Boers, 
friendly Kaffirs, Hottentots and Fingoes. In my travels we came 
across several Bushman caves with rude paintings and drawings 
of antelope and etc. Accompanying this expedition was a rough 
crowd of sailor lads mounted, who presented a spectacle , being 
rightly named "awkward squad". I was subjected to many tempt- 
ations to drink, swear and etc. In consequence of my aversion to 
such practices I was at times forced to sleep out of the tent. Ten 
thousand head of cattle was captured. My share of the prize money 
amounted to several pounds sterling. I deposited it in a Savings 
Bank, which came in very opportune in defraying expenses of my 
emmigration to England. 

Features of the country are rugged, flat and bushy. Has sev- 
eral rivers, none navagable to any great extent, being obstructed 
by sand bars at the mouth. Chief products - -wool, hides, skins 
and wine. The principal sea ports - -Table and Algoa Bays. Iron 
bound coast. In the interior great quantities of game, elephant, 
lions and etc. It has many birds of beautiful plumage but poor 
songsters. It abounds with flowers of every hue. Climate - tem- 
perate in most parts, others very hot. Heavy winds and storms 
prevalent, considerable damage done to shipping at times. Exper- 
iences severe droughts in the interior. Farmers sustain great 
losses in sheep. Sometimes one man will loose several thousand. 
Rivers dry up in the summer. 

The native Kaffirs are a noble, black race. The men, gener- 
ally, are tall and well formed, almost in a state of nudity, a 
bunch of tails of skins of animals hiding their nakedness. Some 
have not even this appendage. The average height of the women 
are about the same as Europeans. Their color is dark brown, 
nearly black, thick lips, beautiful white teeth, wooly hair, noses 
rather flat. The married men's head, in many instances, is 
shaved. On the top alone remains a little hair, covered with a 
polish bark resembling patent leather on the top of the head form- 
ed into a circle of crown. The women when married have the 
head shorn, on the top alone remains a bunch of hair the size of 
the palm of the hand, dyed red with paint or clay. At times the 
Zulu's hair is formed into various shapes with grease resembling 
half moons . 



70 



HENRY A. DIXON 



The natives wear skins around the loins reaching to nearly 
the knee. The young women (unmarried) wear their hair and 
strings of beads of various colours around their necks. They 
have a piece of cloth or skin around the loins about a foot broad, 
tho when at home amongst their relatives at their kraal they dis- 
pense with all coverings. At times when at work on plantations, 
they have only a slight covering of beads a few inches in breadth. 
When a Kaffir enters a town he is compelled to wear a covering. 

Not- withstanding the exposure of their persons, they are a 
virtuous people. I believe death to be the penalty for adultery. 

The natives are polygamists and have to purchase their wives, 
sometimes giving as many as 20 head of cattle for each wife, to 
the girls father. When a man has two or three wives he is inde- 
pendent and never has to work, only for his pleasure. He can 
then spend his time eating, sleeping, hunting and etc. The women 
cultivate the land, build the huts in the form of a beehive, covered 
with straw; they plant the mealies or Indian corn, fetch the wood, 
and in general support the husband. The boys herd the cattle. 

The men generally amuse themselves sitting in the hut con- 
versing and smoking. They get a horn, bore a hole near the wide 
end, insert a reed in this attached pipe bowl of wood. The pipe 
is filled with daga or tobacco, the horn with water. A live coal 
is placed on the daga or wild hemp. The Kaffir takes a draw of 
smoke from the mouth of the horn, retains it in his mouth and 
hands the pipe to another. He then takes small sticks or reeds 
and runs the spittle in bubbles onto the floor then spreads them 
with his fingers, to represent a wall, a man, or an ox, or kraal, 
or cattle, or war parties and etc. A very ingenious though beast- 
ly game . 

In snuffing, in which they often indulge, they take a dry aloe 
leaf, burn it then takes the ashes and coal and mix with thin dry 
leaves of tobacco, rub them on a stone until pulverized, then 
place it in a little calibash or gourd, ornamented with bead or 
burnt places. They then take small bone spoons about one -half 
inch wide, and take a sniff, do not speak but hand it to the next . 
After a few minutes silence the tears begin to flow, he wipes 
them off with his finger, gives a grunt of satisfaction and then 
talks. They frequently dance and drink Jualaa, Indian corn ferm- 
ented, which makes them intoxicated when drunk to excess. It 
resembles milk in color and sour beer in taste. They also drink 
a great quantity of thick milk which mixed with their bread is not 
to be despised. The bread is made by boiling and beating or 
pounding corn till as thin as pancake. When they have a dance, 
which is often naked, one takes the lead in singing, the rest will 



HENRY A. DIXON 



71 



keep time. Their singing often consists of praising his kraal, 
his girl, his chief and etc. The rest follow, all standing in a row, 
they jump a few feet from the ground altogether and quite stiff, 
not a bend in their bodies. At other times they will sit and dis- 
tort their bodies by throwing the head in different positions, one 
taking the lead in singing, the rest following; one making a noise 
like a man sawing wood, the others grunting and singing. They 
appear wild and have the appearance of devils more than that of 
human beings. Their noise is almost deafening. 

The Kaffirs number 156,000. In the Natal Colony they are 
called Zulus. Outside, a still greater number of Macateese, 
Basutus and etc. In the Cape Colony we have the Hottentots, a 
drunken, degraded, dissipated people. The are a tawnyor yellow 
color having high cheek bones, very flat noses, thick lips, more 
of the ape species. They are generally small, especially the wo- 
men. They are a very immoral people, given to drink. They 
are mostly in service to the whites, although some are well-to- 
do and respectable. Oftimes they are squatters on Dutch farms 
and very brutal. 

The Malays number about 10,000 in Cape Town. A more 
civilized people, very dressy with filthy habits- are Mohammed- 
ans. Several are very wealthy. 

Fingoes and Kaffirs in Cape Colony are similiar in many 
respect to the Zulu. Kaffir as above described. 

The native weapons of defense are a knob kerry or club ab- 
out two feet long, the head about two inches in diameter. Asse- 
gai spears are about a foot long attached to a very thin handle 
which is thrown with great dexterity. 

Most of the Dutch inhabitants are termed Boers or farmers. 
The majority being such, they lack energy, many are dilatory, 
having been used to slave labor which was abolished in 1835. In 
consequence of which they have a great dislike for the English. 
The chief aim of many would be to have a nicely painted wagon, 
twelve head and sometimes sixteen oxen in a span to match, a 
good horse and gun and to have coffee available at all hours of 
the day and night. 

I will here relate an incident that transpired. A man named 
Harry Noble having wandered in the woods, could not find his way 
out. Whilst in this situation, thinking to attract attention he call- 
ed out, "lost", "Lost". An old owl neaby answered, "whoooo". 
Thinking it a reply he shouted, "Harry Noble". "Whooo", again 
echoed back from the owl. "Harry Noble", shouted poor Harry. 

I will relate a few incidents relative to this campaign into 
Kerlies Country: 



72 



HENRY A. DIXON 



Whenever the military came to a large Kraal or wherever 
there were a number of huts , those acquainted with the customs of 
the Kaffirs in cache ing their corn and millett, would walk through 
the kraal sticking the ramrods of their guns into the manure un- 
til they struck a rock. Upon removing the rock they would find a 
a large hole, narrow at the top, about two feet hollowed out to sev- 
eral feet at the bottom. This would be filled with corn. 

I once saw a group of Kaffirs, quarelling about an ox. Whilst 
the two head men were disputing about it, some of the small fry 
shot it. Immediately a guard surrounded it whilst it was being 
skinned and etc. So impatient were some of them that before they 
had fully completed their butchering, one severed the hind 
quarters, another shouldered it followed by half dozen men as 
guard, armed with assegais . As soon as the gaul can be got, it 
is cut out, the one obtaining it has frequently to run, swallowing 
it as he is followed by quite a number, all anxious to procure it, 
as they consider it makes them strong and brave, especially if it 
is a lion or leopard's gaul. On one occasion we had scarcely 
camped when two young men quarrelled. There was a dual being 
fought, everything being arranged, pistols loaded by seconds, all 
being ready, they fired. Each was besmeared with blood, as were 
considerably scared thinking he had shot his fellow. After a few 
moments, excitement had subsided; it was discovered that neith- 
er was hurt, as the pistols had been charged with clotted blood. 

During the war many anecdotes were related. Two of the 
principal merchants of Grahamstown, who belonged to a Yeomany 
Corps of Volunteers , whose appearance for show, fancy trappings 
and equipages outvied all others; took a short tour out of town. 
Came to the verge of the bush or jungle one evening, saw some- 
thing sparkling brightly. They put spurs to their horses. The 
one declared he heard a whistle, the other declared there a gr- 
eat many of the enemy, for he had seen their eyes. It proved to 
be nothing less than fire flys or lightening bugs. 

A hottentot on guard one night, heard something and challen- 
ged it. No response. When he had called several times in Eng- 
lish, Dutch and Kaffir, he fired. He heard a peculiar grunt. 
Next morning he discovered he had killed an old sow. 

Henry A. Dixon grew up in a religious environment. He was 
taught and strictly adhered to the practices and beliefs of the 
Church of England. His Mother, Judith Boardman was the daugh- 
ter of the Rev. William Boardman, the first Colonial Minister of 
the Church of England, and also headmaster of the Grammar Sch- 
ool at Bathurst. It was this source that he received the background 



HENRY A. DIXON 



73 



for his undying testimony of the Gospel and his abundance of faith 
which characterized his entire life. He was nineteen years of age 
when he heard the first Mormon Missionaries preaching. These 
first Mormon Missionaries to South Africa were: Leonard I.Smith, 
Jesse Haven and William Walker. He listened to their message 
and was convinced of its truthfullne ss and divinity, but was denied 
the privilege of joining because of the minority of his age. His 
father forbade him accepting the Mormon religion on penalty of 
being cut off without a shilling of inheritance. Being a man of 
honor, Henry promised his father he would not be baptized before 
he was twenty-one years of age. 

The day he became twenty-one years of age (March 14, 1856) 
he was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter 
Day Saints by John Elliston, a local member who held the office 
of a priest, at Uitenhage, C. P. Three days later he left his home, 
upon the request of his father, and sought employment which would 
provide him with the necessary funds to migrate to Utah. In con- 
sequence of his affiliation with the true Church of Christ, he had 
to give up his comfortable and happy home, leaving his sorrowing 
and heartbroken mother and sister, and his determined and stub- 
born father. He was confirmed a member of the Church and or- 
dained a teacher by E. W. Kershaw of Uitenhage in 1856. In this 
same year he was ordained an Elder in Port Elizabeth. 

On November 1, 1856 he set sail for London, England in the 
brig "Unity" owned by two Latter Day Saints, who afterwards em- 
igrated to Utah. They arrived in London on January 12, 1857 . 
From Liverpool, England in company with 816 others, Henry took 
passage' on the ship "George Washington". After twenty-three 
days passage on the Atlantic Ocean, they landed at Boston, Mass- 
achusettes in March 1857. 

Being short of money to continue his journey westward, he 
accepted the offer of an elderly couple by the name of Walker, to 
drive and take care of their ox team and wagon. In return they 
were to provide the equipment and necessities for the whole trip. 
This offer made it possible for him to immediately leave for Zion, 
rather than having to stay in the East and work until sufficient 
money had been accumulated to finance the trip West. 

He became a member of Captain Martin's Company. In this 
same Company was a Widow DeGrey and her four daughters, em- 
igrants from Dudley, England. During the trip he occasionally 
saw a pretty little girl of twelve years of age running along the 
side of the DeGrey wagon. Although his attention was attracted to 
her, little did he realize then she would be his future wife. 



74 



HENRY A. DIXON 



After traveling 1300 miles by ox team, on September 12, 1857, 
the little band of Pioneers arrived at Great Salt Lake City. 

Just three days after his arrival in the Great Salt Lake Valley, 
September 15, 1857, Pres. Brigham Young issued a proclamation 
regarding the Johnston Army invasion. Immediately following the 
publication of this proclamation, the Territorial Militia were ord- 
ered to report to Echo Canyon and maintain it by force of arms if 
necessary. On Septembe r 27, 1857, Henry A. Dixon started on 
this expedition to Echo Canyon to repel the U. S. Army. Some 
ten weeks later, after the snow had piled so high that the move- 
ments of troops through the canyon passes was impossible, he re- 
turned to the comforts and hospitality of Great Salt Lake City. 

It was the purpose of these militia men to construct such 
fortifications and breastworks as they might be able to make at 
the "narrows" in Echo Canyon, and also on the heights along the 
whole length of the mountain gorge. If the U.S. Army had moved 
through that Canyon, they would have received a shower of rocks, 
boulders and bullets, the like they had never before experienced. 

After his return from the Echo Canyon Expedition in December, 
although previously baptized and confirmed in South Africa, he was 
re -baptized and re-confirmed by Elder Leonard I. Smith on Dec- 
ember 12, 1857. 

This same month (December 1857) he was appointed to go on 
a mission to the Rio "Virgin and Santa Clara Settlements. The 
Settlement of Washington was founded with the sole purpose of 
raising cotton. Here it was that the first cotton in Utah was rais- 
ed. As a whole, the experiment was not very successful. Bad 
seed brought from Texas that was several years old, unskilled ir- 
rigation, and general dissatisfaction with the country were the 
biggest reasons for the cotton failure. 

The year I860 found Henry A. Dixon back again in Salt Lake 
City working with a pick and shovel out in the Sugarhouse area. 
Brigham Young in passing one day noticed him at work, and stop- 
ped to chat with him. At the conclusion of their visit, Pres. Young 
told him to lay down his pick and shovel and come down to his 
office. It was here that Brigham Young asked him to go on a mis- 
sion to England and his native land, Africa. 

On August 6, 1861, after having served about a year at South- 
ampton and the Reading Conference in the British Mission, Henry 
received a letter of appointment to the South African Mission. 

September 7, 1861, President William Fotheringham, John 
Talbot, Martin Zyderlaan and Henry A. Dixon boarded the sailing 
vessel "Barque Sydney", a vessel of 340 tons bound for Capetown, 
South Africa. Most of the way, sailing was pleasant. In going 



HENRY A. DIXON 



75 



a cross the equator, the weather became very warm and uncom- 
fortable. Near the end of their destination they encountered heavy 
and rough seas. On the 10th of December, after having sailed for 
twenty-four hours, they came out on the leward side of where they 
had been the previous day, no progress having been made. In three 
days they had only made fifteen miles. 

Arriving in sight of land and within a dozen miles of their 
destination, a heavy gale suddenly came up and blew them out 
forty miles from where they were the previous day. The sailors 
became so fatigued and tired in their battle with the elements that 
the four missionaries aided them by bailing water and other odd 
jobs. Provisions and water ran low. This made it necessary to 
go on short rations; mainly, one bisquit per meal and two quarts 
of water each day per person. 

While the ship was rolling and tossing; much of the time on 
its side, one of the Elders, who was very ill, was told to get up 
for the vessel was sure to be swamped in the heavy storm. This 
news did not seem to bother him, for he just turned over and said 
that he had been set apart to go to Africa to preach the Gospel .A 
little storm was not going to interfere with his carrying out his 
mission. Through the pe^piration of the sailors and the constant 
prayers of the Elders, the little vessel finally succeeded in mak- 
ing the harbor of Table Bay on December 15, 1861. 

In the January 7th, 1862 issue of the Cape Argus, appeared 
the following account of the arrival of the four Mormon Elders: 
Arrival of Mormon Preachers for the Cape 

"Four preachers have just arrived in this Colony from Utah, 
with a view of promulgating Mormon doctrines, and winning con- 
verts to the Mormon Faith. Two of the preachers are natives of 
Grahams Town, who have been dwellers in Utah, and who have re- 
turned to convert the colonial born. Their names are: John Talbot 
and Henry Dixon. A Hollander named Martin Zyderlaan, also 
from the Lake, is to preach in Dutch, and convert the Dutch pop- 
ulation. Wm. Fotheringham, a Scotchman born, but now like the 
other three, a Mormon preacher and a citizen of the United States, 
and direct from Utah, is we understand the leader. He assures 
us that the stories promulgated here, said to be by persons who 
have been disappointed after going over, are utterly untrue. He 
says all who have gone over are happy and prosperous, as is the 
State of Utah generally. 

He represents the soil as less fertile than some of the United 
States, but he says it yields in abundance, and hemmed in as the 
Mormon People are by the hills, they live in peace and prosperity, 
and no one can molest them from without, of the truth of the Pro- 



76 



HENRY A. DIXON 



phets revelation we adduce the following. ( A revelation and pro- 
phecy by the Prophet, Seer, and Revelator Joseph Smith, given 
Dec. 25, 1832. ) 

This pamphlet published in 1851, entitled the Pearl of Great 
Price, by Joseph Smith, First Prophet, Seer and Revelator of 
the Church of Jesus Christ of L.D. Saints and is said to be veri- 
fied by the war now raging in America. Utah, Mr. Fotheringham 
states, stands by the Union and will be prepared to pay its quota 
towards carrying on the war. 

Utah situated 1032 miles from the frontier boundry, will be 
taxed willingly for the war and will stand by the Constitution to 
the last." (Copies from the Cape Argus, Jan. 7, 1862. Published 
by W. R. Murry. Copies by nearly all the papers in the Colony. ) 

Elder Henry A. Dixon stayed at Capetown, Mowbray and vin- 
cinity until January 12, 1862. His parents having sent him passage 
money he sailed for Port Elizabeth, arriving there on January 
16th. One of the members of the Church, Bro. Glensay, loaned him 
the use of his horse to ride up to Uitenhage where his Father and 
Mother were pleased to see him and he was most pleased to see 
them. 

The greatest part of his mission was spent in and around his 
place of birth, Grahamstown; also at Uitenhage, King Williams 
Town, Port Elizabeth, Beaufort, Adelaide, East London, Queens- 
town, Burghers Dorp, and most all the Eastern Province, includ- 
ing in and around Durban, Natal Province. 

He traveled without "purse or script", something his father 
could neve r understand. Even though his father did not agree 
with his affiliations and activities in the new Church, he occas- 
ionally furnished him with clothes and a little money to buy the 
necessities of life. 

For days at a time, his diet consisted of syrup, made by add- 
ing boiling water to sugar; and then pouring this over bread. 

On his return to the place of his birth, Grahams Town, he 
was shunned by many of his former school mates and some of his 
relatives and friends. This indeed made him very sad and blue; 
for to him the Gospel of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints was the 
greatest thing in all the world, even greater than life itself. 

Most of his relatives and friends were glad to welcome him 
back home and treated himwell, by offering him entertainment 
and listening to his message. It was the members of the Church 
who consistently provided the missionaries with food, clothing and 
a place to sleep. Some missionaries received such gifts as money, 
saddles, horses and many other items from the Members. 

It seems that Henry A. Dixon had a definite mission to perform 



HENRY A. DIXON 



77 



in this life. Many times his life was spared in order that he could 
accomplish this work. 

At Port Elizabeth on Friday, January 9, 1863, the following 
incident was recorded in Henry A. Dixon's Diary: 

"This morning myself and Brother Atwood took Brothers Tal- 
bot and Stickle horses to bathe. I rode Brother Stickle's horse, a 
very large one, out into the breakers. A very heavy breaker cov- 
ered us. The horse came nearly falling over. I let go the reins 
and swam. I did not apprehend any great danger. After struggling 
a few minutes I found I did not make much headway. Several break- 
ers came in quick succession over me. I felt my strength failing 
me. I prayed the Lord to preserve me. I tried to find ground but 
did not succeed, two or three times. I began to drown, a great 
quantity of water having entered my body. I felt resigned that it 
was the Lord's will that I should die. I called to Brother Atwood, 
held up my hand to draw his attention, as there was such a current. 
He made an attempt, rode in but was quickly washed off his horse. 
Had to return. It was root hog or die. He thought I was gone. He 
knelt down and prayed. I struggled found ground. Brother Adwood 
took me by the hand. A breaker knocked us down. He led me out . 
Death depicted in my countenance. I felt so weak I could not move 
my limbs for him to dress me. He administered to me twice. 
Brought up a considerable amount of water and bile. He laid me 
down and went and got a cart and brought me to Brother Slaughter's. 
Was very weak and had a severe headache attented with a fever. 
Was adminstered to by Pres. Fotheringham and Brother Atwood 
Got some better. " 

Many times during his mission, he was threatened with being 
mobbed. On one occasion while preaching on the street, a mob 
gathered to disturb him. One man, owner of the Hotel, threw a 
monkey on his head, but it did not even scratch him. The crowd 
began to shove and push, throwing loose objects at him and even 
batting him over the head with sticks. . Finally one gentlemen, rea- 
lizing the situation, took him by the hand and led him into his gard- 
en. The mob took after them, but were stopped at the gate of the 
garden by another gentleman. 

Judge Noon has related many stories and incidents that happen- 
ed to the early missionaries, when he was living at Ispingo, near 
Durban, Natal. 

On one occasion, Henry A. was holding a street meeting. The 
crowd started to ask questions. They not receiving their answer in 
the great confusion which followed, became angry. Soon they were 
calling Henry all sorts of vile names, and it soon developed into 
an unmane age able mob. Judge Noon and his brother, realizing 



78 



HENRY A. DIXON 



the dangerous situation Henry A. was in, then rode through the 
crowd on their horses and picked him up bodily and carried him 
away to their plantation. 

In the latter part of 1864, after having endured many hardships, 
Henry A. Dixon completed his mission in South Africa and after 
bidding his Mother and Father and many friends goodbye, he re- 
turned to his adopted country and Church Headquarters, Salt Lake 
City, Utah. 

After his return to Salt Lake City, from his African Mission, 
Henry A. used to make friendly visits to the home of Widow DeGrey 
and her family, who were then living in the Eleventh Ward. The 
older girls had all married and moved from their mother's home, 
leaving Sarah and her mother along in the little, humble log home. 
Sarah, now a girl of twenty, attracted his attention and they were 
married January 21, 1865. 

In the Spring of 1865 he was called to go to Sanpete County 
during the Indian troubles with Black Hawk. He was in Captain 
Charles Crow's Company (Major Andrew Burt's Command) Utah 
Militia Infantry, Black Hawk War. 

Henry A. Being a man of ability and industry, secured a good 
position as Tithing Clerk in the Tithing Office at Salt Lake City. 
The young married couple then built a neat little log house, on the 
same lot, near the house of Mother DeGrey. Here mother and 
daughter could enjoy the close companionship of each other, yet 
maintain their own home. The Dixon home was a happy one and on 
November 14, 1865 their first child, Henry Alfred Dixon was born. 
This happiness was soon marred on July 1, 1867 when Alfred died 
and was buried in Salt Lake City. Just sixteen days later, happin- 
ess again entered the home with the birth of John DeGrey Dixon on 
July 16, 1867. 

As Tithing Clerk.it was Henry's responsibility to find accom- 
odations and work for all the newly arrived emmigrants. In the 
Gillispie Company, which arrived in Salt Lake City on September 
of 1868, a smiling black eyed girl named Mary Smith arrived and 
desired work, to sustain herself as well as the good people who 
had brought her from England. Henry was very much attracted by 
her fine appearance and her womanly ways, even though she was 
only seventeen. For months he kept watch of her, and finally suc- 
ceeded in claiming her as his second wife. They were married 
April 13, 1869. 

For seven years he worked in the Tithing Offices and proved 
himself as an honest, upright, ambitious and conscientious man. 
In 1870, the Woolen Mills at Provo was established, and Pres. 
Brigham Young selected Henry A. Dixon to go to Provo as Book- 
keeper, where he remained for the next nine years. 




Provo Woolen Mills - ! J>econc Korth 



HENRY A. DIXON 



79 



On June 1, 1869, a company known as the TIMPANOGOS MANUF- 
ACTURING COMPANY was formed to build and operate a woolen mills 
The mill site was bought from Hon. John Taylor, and ground for 
the first building was broken on the 28th of May 1870. The erection of 
the building was under the management of Pres. A. O. Smoot. Bishop 
Andrew H. Scott assisted Pres. Smoot in the construction. The build- 
ings were erected at a cost of $155 , 000. 00. Workmen were recruited 
from all over the territory and most of them received stock in the 
Company for their labors. Most of the materials furnished were paid 
for by stock in the Company. 

President Brigham Young advanced $70, 000. 00 in cash to pur- 
chase the machinery in the East. Mr. F.X. Loughery of Philadelphia 
was engaged to install the machinery and get the mill in operation. 

In 1872 the Timpanogos Manufacturing Company was incorporated 
with a capital stock of $1,000,000.00 in 10,000 shares of one hundred 
dollars per share. 

Officers and Directors were: 



In October 1872 the cards and mules were started and yarn was 
spun and marketed. It was not until June 187 3 that cloth was manufac- 
tured. 

Myron Tanner was the first superintendent of this Provo Co-op- 
erative Woolen Mills, as it was then known. In 1874, James Dunn be- 
came superintendent and under his supervision it became a first class 
operation and achieved reasonable success. Reed Smoot was appoint- 
ed superintendent with the resignation of James Dunn. 

The rock building was built in the northwest corner of block 87, 
Plat A, Provo City Survey. The main building was 145 x 65 feet, a 
four story rock structure with a half mansaard roof covered with tin 
roofing and a thirty foot tower. 

The upper floor was used for sorting of the wool and preparing it 
for the cards. On the floor below were eight sets of cards and one hand 
mule of 240 spindles, two reels and two spoolers. On the next floor 
below was the spinning room containing four self acting mules with 720 
spindles each. 



Pre sident 
Vice-pre sident 
Vice -pre sident 



Brigham Young 
A. O. Smoot 
Myron Tanner 
Henry A. Dixon 
L. John Nuttall 
William Bringhurst 
Orvil Simmons 
Joseph S. Tanner 
Andrew H. Scott 



Secretary 

Treasurer 

Directors 



80 



HENRY A. DIXON 



The ground floor of this main rock building contained nineteen 
broad looms and thirty-eight narrow looms, two wrappers and 
dressers, one shawl finger, one quilting frame, one bear nes and 
a machine for a double and twist stocking yarn of sixty- two spindles. 

The finishing house was built of adobe just south of the rock build- 
ing. It was a two and one half story building, 70 x 30 feet. On the 
first floor were three washe rs , three filter, two large screw presses, 
two gigs, one cloth measurer and one hand picker. 

The factory was run by water power, the water coming down the 
Mill Race into two Leffel turbine wheels, one thirty -six inches and 
the other a forty-four inch wheel. The factory had a rotary pump. 

Immediately south of the main rock building was a two and one- 
half story adobe building, 33 x 134 feet. The upper room was used 
for the receiving and sorting of the wool and the lower floor for the 
office and sales room, carpenter shop and drying room. Just east of 
this building was a one story, frame 30 x 60 foot building used for a 
dye house and scouring room. 

The factory employed on an average of one -hundred twenty-four to 
One hundred fifty operatives. Many came from England and Scotland. 

In 1871 Henry A. Dixon moved his two wives and their families 
from Salt Lake City to a newly constructed adobe house on the corner 
of Third West and Second North, just one block from his work at the 
factory. 

During the time he was bookkeeper at the Woolen Mills he acted as 
Utah County Treasurer. 

Although in poor health at the time, on October 9, 1879, he left 
his family of two wives with their five children each, in answer to his 
second call to a foreign mission. This time it was to Great Britain. It 
was a great sacrifice to be called upon to make, for not only himself, 
but his wives and children, who would now have to support themselves. 
This beautifully portrays the abundance of faith and courage our pion- 
eer ancestors possessed. 

He took passage on the Steamship "Arizona" of the Guion Lines. 
While on the way the ship encountered an ice -berg which damaged the 
ship and endangered the lives of the passengers. The ship finally rea- 
ched the port of St. Johns, Newfoundland. It stayed there one week 
until the passengers transferred to the ship "Nevada". Notes from his 
journal record the following: 

Aboard the S. S. "Arizona" Friday, November 7, 1879 

"About 8:45 p.m. engines stopped and we felt a sudden shock, we 
were about having our evening prayers. Before we could do so we rush- 
ed on deck thinking we had struck a vessel, when lo and behold we had 
struck an immense ice -berg. We were going at the rate of 16 knots an 
hour. 



HENRY A. DIXON 



81 



The force was so great as to completely stove in our bulkhead or 
bow, leaving about 20 tons of ice on the forecastle bulkhead. It broke 
both anchors. One chain was tested to hold 12 tons. A shocking site 
to behold. A very large hole in her just above the water edge. Four 
thousand gallons of water in the bulkhead. Two or three sailors were 
buried in the ice in the forecastle. Some time before they could be got 
out. One hurt very badly. 

It was a clear night, the icebergs looked similiar to a bluish white 
cloud looming up about 50 feet. An awful grand sight. 

The boats were ordered to be loosed from the davids, ready if 
needed. Considerable excitement on board. A Presbyterian minister 
with satchel in hand was ready to look to No.l. Some women were 
terribly excited. 

We were from 240 to 250 miles from St. John's, Newfoundland. 
Steaming eight or nine knots an hour, notwithstanding her situation. 

The "Arizona" steamship of the Guion Line, is built in seven com- 
partments. All luggage was removed aft to lighten her. I called the 
boys together during the excitement and prayed the Lord to enable us 
to avert the calamity that it might be no worse. We exercised our 
Priesthood, prayed for a calm and that we might live, also all onboard 
get to our destination, also the vessel. 

We went below to our cabins, prayed frequently according to the 
order of the Priesthood, for a calm sea and no wind, as this is appar- 
ently our salvation temporarily. 

During the night I went on deck and while alone rebuked the winds 
and waves. We have a calm sea. Prayers answered. Also prayed 
for a vessel to come to our rescue if necessary and wisdom to be giv- 
en the Captain. Prince of Power and Air to have no control at this time 
Committed ourselves to God. 

In talking to some of the passengers, I promised no lives should 
be lost or ship either, in the name of the Lord. 

ST. JOHNS, NEWFOUNDLAND, Sunday November 9, 1879 

Having remained in sight of harbor all night, arrived about 11:00 
p.m. This morning at 8:00 o'clock, pilot came aboard and took us in- 
to port. Very rocky coast, only one entrance to bay and that very 
narrow. Rocks on either side. Inside, a nice , comfortable harbor. 
Completely land blocked. Must have been 150 vessels of all sizes at 
anchor. People flocked down to the wharf by the thousands. 

Several boats filled with small boys, saw more boys than since I 
left home, all healthy and strong. I suppose them to belong to fishing 
smack or schooners. The population appears to contain a great many 
Irish people, contains about 49,000 of the Islands 96,000. The streets 
very crooked in steps as it were along the hillside. 

The damage done vessel was greater than I anticipated. The break 



8 2 HENRY A. DIXON 

extended below the water mark, the whole length of the keel. " 

After a very rough voyage, the "Nevada" arrived in Liverpool 
in November 1879. After laboring in the Liverpool Conference for 
about a year, Henry was released to return home on account of ill 
health. 

Reaching Salt Lake City in November 1880, he obtained work as 
assistant bookkeeper for the H. Dinwoody Furniture Co. , for one year 
when he resigned to take the position of shipping clerk in Z. C.M.I. 

He still had his home in Provo, where one of his families was 
living. The other family had moved to Salt Lake to be with him. So 
when the Z. C.M.I, built their new wholesale house in Provo, he sub- 
mitted his application for the position as manager. His application 
was readily accepted and he was installed as the first manager of the 
Provo Branch of Z. C. M. I. He was then united with his two families 
and everything went along smoothly and he began to prosper. 

In May 1874 his 88 year old father died in South Africa. Henry 
received his portion of his father's estate. This he wisely invested 
in the purchase of two farms. One, the brickyard farm, located on 
the present site of the Provo Brick & Tile Co. property. The other 
was located about a mile further north in Carte rville. From these 
farms he was able to grow all the vegetable and fruits the families 
needed. The farms also proved pasture land for the cows and horses. 

This peaceful happiness and prosperity was not to last long. On 
April 28, 1884, Henry Aldous Dixon was stricken with pneumonia and 
just one week later, May 4, 1884 he passed on to his reward. 

The whole community mourned the passing of this good man in his 
49th year. He had friends without number. It is said, "To know 
Henry A. Dixon was to love him. " Little children loved him for his 
kindness and the consideration he always gave them. 

Mrs. Samuel Jepperson has said that she heard Pres. Brigham 
Young speak in the old Provo Tabernacle and say this of Henry A. 
Dixon: "Of all the men I know and trust, Henry A. Dixon is the one 
man I could trust with all my wealth and with all the wealth of the land, 
knowing full well that it would all be accounted for, in detail, when I 
de sired. " 



Compiled by Clarence D. Taylor 
January 1 951 




3rd West 
Fro 



HENRY A. DIXON'S ACCOUNT OF ICEBERG COLLISION 

From H is Journal 

Aboard the S. S. "Arizona". Friday November 7, 1879 

"About 8:45 p.m. engines stopped and we felt a sudden shock, 
we were about having our evening prayers. Before we could do so 
we rushed on deck thinking we had struck a vessel, when lo and be- 
hold we had struck an immense iceberg. We were going at the rate 
of 16 knots an hour. 

The force was so great as to completely stove in our bulkhead 
or bow, leaving about 20 tons of ice on the forecastle bulkhead. 
Broke both anchors, one chain was tested to hold 12 tons. Shock- 
ing site to behold. A very large hole in her, just above the water 
edge. Four thousand gallons of water in the bulkhead. Two or 
three sailors buried in the ice in the forecastle, some time be- 
fore they could get out. One hurt very badly. 

It was a clear night, the iceberg looked similiar to a bluish- 
white cloud looming up about 50 feet. An awful grand sight. 

The boats were ordered to be loosed from the davids ready if 
needed. Considerable excitement on board. A Presbyterian min- 
ister with satchel in hand was ready to look to No. 1. Some of the 
women were terribly excited. 

We were from 240 to 25 miles from St. John's , Newfoundland. 
Steaming eight or nine knots an hour, notwithstanding her situation. 

The "Arizona" steamship of the Guion Line, is built in seven 
compartments. All luggage was removed aft to lighten her. I call- 
ed the boys together during the excitement and prayed the Lord to 
enable us to avert calamity, that it might be no worse. We exer- 
cised our Priesthood, prayed for a calm and that we might live, 
also all on board get to our destination, also the vessel. 

Went below to our cabins, prayed frequently according to the 
order of the Priesthood, for a calm sea and no wind, as this is ap- 
parently our salvation temporarily. 

During the night we went on deck and while alone, rebuked 
winds and waves. We have a calm sea. Prayers answered. Also 
prayed for a vessel to come to our rescue, if necessary, and wis- 
dom to be given the Captain, and Prince of Power and Air to have 
no control, at this time. Committed ourselves to God. 

In talking to some of the passengers, I promised no lives sho- 
uld be lost or ship either, in the name of the Lord. " 

St. Johns, Newfoundland, Sunday, November 9, 1879. 

"Having remained in sight of harbor all night, arrived about 



83 



84 



ICEBERG -SHIP COLLISION 



11:00 P.M. This morning at 8:00 o'clock, pilot came aboard and took 
us into port. Very rocky coast, only one entrance to bay and that very 
narrow. Rocks on either side. Inside a nice, comfortable harbor 
completely land blocked. Must have been over 150 vessels of all sizes 
at anchor. People flocked down to the wharf by thousands. 

Several boats filled with small boys, saw more boys than since I 
left home, all healthy and strong. I suppose them to belong to fishing 
smacks or schooners. The population appears to contain a great many 
Irish people, contains about 49, 000 of the Island's 96,000. The streets 
are very crooked, in steps as it were, along the hillside. 

The damage done vessel was greater than I anticpated. The break 
extended below the water mark, the whole length of the keel" 

Monday, November 10, 1879. 

"I took a walk into the country for about three or four miles. Beaut- 
iful scenery, farmhouses, meadows, and timber. Beautiful lake and 
beautiful harbor. In the evening writing home, also sending a few news- 
pape rs. 

November 11th. Writing on back of 25 cards, Articles of Faith, "Any 
person desirous of further information relative to these principles, 
until Thursday, November 13, 1879, address Elder Henry A. Dixon, 
St. Johns. After that date, to William Budge, Esq. , 42 Islington St. , 
Liverpool, England." 

Comments on the above incident by Maria D. Taylor: 

"While on a visit to Price, Utah in September 1930, my son Elton 
was telling me he spoke of this incident in Fast Meeting and a gentle- 
man arose and said, "in the mouth of two witnesses all things shall be 
established. " 

This Brother Potter stated that he came home on that same vessel 
sometimes later. He talked to the Captain and also the crew and they 
all said it was nothing short of a miracle. 

He said he saw the vessel while in the docks for repairs and there 
was a hole in it as large as a good sized room. 

He was told that at the time of the accident, word was taken to the 
owner of the ship, Mr. Guion, who asked if any Mormons were aboard. 
They told him there were four. He went back to bed and said he knew 
the vessel would land safe, for forty years they had been carrying 
Mormons, no ship was lost. It paid them better than insurance. " 



A COLLISION AT SEA 



THE WONDERFUL ESCAPE OF THE S. S. ARIZONA, WHICH 
COLLIDED WITH AN ICEBERG 

" The present associate editor of the "Star" was a passenger on the 
S.S. "Arizona" when that vessel sailed from New York, September 5, 
1891. The first night out the vessel was struck amidship by a three 
masted ship. The terrific shock which was then experienced is still 
remembered. Very little damage, however, was done, and the ship 
"Arizona" went on her way with but a dent in her side and about twenty 
feet of the railing torn away. 

The porthole of the stateroom where four Elders lay sleeping was 
struck, and the glass flew over their beds. As they were suddenly 
awakened by the shock, and felt the pieces of glass, one of them ex- 
claimed: "ICEBERGS!" 

He thought an iceberg had been struck. Later, when excitement 
was somewhat abated, he told of the "Arizona" s"experience with these 
dangers of the deep. 

The incident is described by an article in the Windsor Magazine 
for August entitled, "The Peril Of The Iceberg. " After reading it, 
the MILLENIAL STAR of December 1, 1879, was examined, and there 
was found a letter written by Elder Henry A. Dixon to Pres. William 
A. Budge, giving an account of the incident. Three other Elders were 
on the vessel, and the narrative adds but one more testimony to the 
truth that notwithstanding the great amount of traveling the Latter- 
Day Saints have done on the sea, the Lord has preserved them as in 
the hollow of His Hand from the dangers of the deep. Elder Dixon's 
letter contains the following: 

"On the evening of the 7th inst. , about a quarter to nine o'clock, 
the engines ceased working; there was a sudden thud and shock. I 
rushed on deck, thinking we had struck a vessel, and expected to see 
the ship I had supposed we collided with go down. Looking over the 
bulwarks into the seething sea-foam, my attention was directed to the 
iceberg. I should have mistaken it for a white cloud, as it resembled 
one very much in appe arance , being like a bluish ground with a mantle 
of snow for a covering. The order was given for the boats to be low- 
ered. At this time there was a good deal of excitement. Myself and 
brethren united in prayer to the Lord for the preservation of the ves- 
sel and all on board. The spirit of prophecy came upon me. I felt to 
cheer and comfort the passengers, telling a. number of them, in the 
name of the Lord, no lives would be lost, and the vessel would reach 
port in safety. " 

"By the collision the bow was stove in, there being a big hole, 
about thirty feet in depth and twenty feet in width, in the widest part. 
About fifteen tons of ice were jammed into her forecastle, and three 



85 



86 



A COLLISION AT SEA 



sailors were buried in it. It was some time before they could be ex- 
tricated. One being insensible when taken out. Fortunately, the vessel 
is constructed of the very best material, and has seven compartments. " 

"We return thanks to our Heavenly Father for the preservation of 
our live s . " 

That part of the magazine article which deals with the "Arizona" 
accident is as follows: 

"The most remarkable case on record of an iceberg collision is 
that of the Guion Liner "Arizona" in 1879. She was then the greyhound 
of the Atlantic, and the largest ship afloat--5, 750 tons--except the 
"Great Eastern". Leaving New York in November for Liverpool, with 
five hundred nine souls aboard, she was coursing across the banks, 
with fair weather but dark, when near midnight about 250 miles east 
of St. John's, she rammed a monster iceberg at full speed — eighteen 
knots. Terrific was the impact and indescribable the alarm. The 
passengers, flung from their berths, made for the deck, as they stood, 
though some were so injured as to be helpless, and the calls of those 
forward, added to the shrieks of the frenzied mob of half-clad men and 
women who charged for the boats, made up a pandemonium. Wild cries 
arose that the ship was sinking, for she had settled by the head, and 
with piteous appeals and despairing exclamations the passenge r s urged 
the boats over, that they might escape the death they thought inevitable. 
But the crew were well in hand, the officers maintained order, and a 
hurried examination being made, the forward bulkhead was seen to be 
safe. The welcome word was passed along that the ship, though sorely 
stricken, would still float until she could make harbor. The vast white 
terror had lain across her course, stretched so far each way that, 
when descried, it was too late to alter the helm. Its giant shape filled 
the foreground, towering high above the masts, grim, and guant, and 
ghastly, immovable as the damantine buttre sse s of a frowning seaboard, 
while the liner lurched and staggered like a wounded thing in agony as 
her engines slowly drew her back from the rampart against which she 
had flung herself. " 

"She was headed for St. John's at slow speed, so as not to strain 
the bulkhead too much, and arrived there thirty- six hours later. That 
little port-the crippled ship's hospital-has seen many a strange sight 
come in from the sea, but never a more astounding spectacle than that 
which she presented the Sunday forenoon she entered there. " 

"Be gob, Captain!" said the pilot as he swung himself over the 
rail. "I've heard of carrying coals to Newcastle, but this is the first 
time I've seen a steamer bringing a load of ice into St. John's. " 

"They are a grim race, these sailors, and, the danger over, the 
Captain's reply was, "We were lucky, my man, that we didn't all go 



A COLLISION AT SEA 



87 



to the bottom in an ice-box. 11 

"Her deck and forepart were cumbered with great fragments of 
ice, weighing over two hundred tons in all, shattered from the berg 
when she struck, being so wedged into the fractures and gaps as to 
make it unwise to start them until she was docked. The whole popu- 
lation of St. John's lined the water-front to witness her arrival. Her 
escape was truly marvelous, and the annals of marine adventure may 
be searched in vain for its equal. From the top- rail to keelson her 
bows were driven in, the gaping wound fully twenty feet wide, and the 
massive plates and ribs crumbled up like so many pieces of cardboard. 
All the ironwork was twisted into fantastic forms; the oak planking was 
smashed into splinters , the beams and stanchion which backed the bow 
were shattered and torn, and her stem-piece had been wrenched off 
when she had bitten into the berg. As the dead weight, including en- 
gines and cargo, must have been fully 10,000 tons, and this propelled 
through the water at an eighteen knot clip must have produced momen- 
tum, the wonder is that she was not ripped apart and sent to the bot- 
tom with all on board in the twinkling of an eye. " 

"That she was well built her experience attested. Had her for- 
ward bulkhead started and the water poured in, they must have aban- 
doned her and taken to the boats, a most hazardous as well as unplea- 
sant alternative. Everything fragile aboard her had been broken, and 
every human being had participated in a unique adventure, one which 
none wished repeated. She remained at St. John's some months, had 
a temporary wooden bow built into her, and then returned to New York 
for permanent repairs." 

"Many curious incidents occured in the panic, as always so on 
such occasions. A New York millionaire's wife rushed on deck bare- 
footed and in her nightdress, drawing her stocking on her hands, and 
vainly endeavoring to find the fingers. A man appeared from the sal- 
oon with two gripsacks and a lifebuoy. He tossed this overboard first, 
then threw the bags after it, and was following himself when seized by 
a sailor. An elderly gentleman with a weak heart fainted away in the 
saloon at the shock of the impact, and was found there when the pas- 
sengers returned from the deck to cloth themselves. Recovering to 
see the anxious- faced, half clad watchers about him, and believing 
for the moment that he was the concern, he deprecatingly observed: 
"I am very sorry. Do not be alarmed, It is nothing, I assure you. " 



HENRY A. DIXON'S PATRIARCHAL BLESSING 



Great Salt Lake City- 
August 25th 1867 

A Blessing given by Jno. Smith Patriarch upon the head of Henry 
Aldous Dixon, son of John Henry and Judith Dixon, born at Grahams - 
Town, Cape of Good Hope, South Africa, March 14th 1835. 

Bro. Henry, in the name of Jesus of Nazereth, I place my hands 
upon thy head in order to pronounce and seal a blessing upon thee, 
Therefore prepare thy mind and look forward to the future that thy lin- 
eage may be made known and that thy blessings made manifest. Thou 
art of the blood of Joseph through the loins of Ephr aim, therefore thou 
art entitled to all the blessings of the New and Everlasting Covenant 
and I seal upon thee also all the blessings of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob 
and say unto thee, be of good cheer and let thy heart be comforted, for 
the Lord knoweth thine integrity, and thy sins are forgiven thee. He 
will also answer thy petitions to thy satisfaction and the comforter 
shall whisper peace and consolation in thine ear and give you due no- 
tice that you may be prepared for every emergency, as has been made 
manifest here-to-fore, thou shalt also be an instrument in the hands 
of the Lord in doing much good in thy day, and shall administer in 
the House of our God and thou shalt be blessed with a posterity which 
shall be honourable in the land, and thy sons shall be mighty in the 
Priesthood. Thou shalt have power over the adversary and be mighty 
in healing the sick by the laying on of hands, and be able to do many 
miracles in the name of the Lord, Jesus Christ. And thou shalt live 
to take vengeance upon the ungodly who shed the blood of the Saints and 
Prophets and raised their voices and hands against the people of God. 
This blessing I seal upon thy head and I seal thee up unto Eternal 
Life to come forth in the morning of the first Resurrection, the Sav- 
ior of thy Father's house, even so. AMEN. 

Recorded in Book A, Page 446 



88 



DEATH OF HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 
(Copied From Old Newspaper Clipping 
Probably Deseret News ) 

AN EVENTFUL LIFE - - Henry Aldous Dixon, son of John Henry 
and Judith Dixon, was born March 14, 1835, in Grahams Town, South 
Africa. He heard the gospel through the labors of Elders Jesse Haven, 
Leonard I. Smith and Wm. Walker, missionaries to that nation and 
was convinced of its truth when 19 years of age, but was forbidden by 
his father to be baptized until he was of age, on pain of being cut off 
without a shilling. He was baptized March 14, 1856, his 21st birth- 
date, emigrated in the ship "Unity" (barque) landing in London Docks, 
and took passage from Liverpool in the ship George Washington; cros- 
sed the plains in Captain Martin's Company and the following year 
was called to Echo Canyon. 

The next spring he was called with Brother Home and others to 
go to Dixie to raise cotton. They were the first to raise cotton in Utah. 
In the year I860 he was called on a mission to his native land, on a 
four year mission, labored one year in the British Mission, in the 
Reading Conference, and part of the time in Southampton. Arriving 
home he married in January 1865, and was called the following spring 
to go to Sanpete during the Indian troubles, in Captain Andrew Burt's 
Company. After his return he acted as Clerk in the Tithing Office, in 
this city seven years, and was then called by President B. Young to 
take a mission to Provo, to take charge of the books of the Provo 
Woolen Factory, where he labored faithfully between eight and nine 
years, at the same time being County Treasurer. 

He again filled a mission to Great Britain, starting on the 9th of 
October 1879, being in poor health at that time. He took passage in 
the steamship "Arizona'/Guion Line; on the way the ship encountered 
an iceberg, damaging the ship and hewas taken to the port of St. John's 
Newfoundland, staying one week. Again sailing in the ship "Nevada", 
after a very rough passage he arrived in Liverpool in November , lab- 
ored in the Liverpool Conference one year, was honorably released to 
return home on account of sickness, and reached Salt Lake in Novem- 
ber 1880. He reported himself and was blessed by Presidents Taylor, 
Cannon, and Smith. He afterwards acted as assistant book-keeper to 
Henry Dinwoodey, in this city for one year, also labored in Z. C. M. I. 
and was appointed to Provo to take charge of the Z. C. M. I. Wholesale 
House; where he labored very faithfully. He was taken sick on Monday, 
April 28th, and continued to his bed with pneumonia, which turned to 
brain fever. Death put an end to his sufferings Sunday afternoon, May 
4th at 3 o'clock. 

The funeral services were conducted in the Provo Tabernacle by 
Bishop Tanner on Tuesday last. The speakers were Presidents D. 
John and H. H. Cluff, Elders S. S. Jones and E. Harding and Bishop 



89 



90 



DEATH OF HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



Tanner, all bearing testimony to the good life of the deceased and 
sympathizing with the wives and children he had left. The beautiful 
anthem, "Pope 's Ode" , "Tital Spark" , etc. was rende red excellenly by 
the choir, and benediction was pronounced by Patriarch Zebedee Colt- 
rin. 

The deceased leaves two wives and thirteen children, the oldest 
not yet 17 years. Fifty-four vehicles followed his remains to the cem- 
ete ry . 

( Copied from old newspaper clipping ) 



OBI_T_UARY 

The funeral services over the remains of our brother and fellow 
citizen took place in the Meeting House in this City on Tuesday morn- 
ing last. The house was crowded; and several of the Elders offered 
consoling remarks. 

Henry Aldous Dixon, son of John Henry and Judith Dixon, was 
born March 14th 1835, in Grahams Town, Cape of Good Hope, South 
Africa. He heard the Gospel through the labors of Elders Jesse Haven, 
Leonard Smith and W. Walker, when he was 19 years of age, and was 
baptized March 14, 1856. He shortly afterwards emigrated to Utah. 
He was one of the first who raised cotton in Southern Utah. He went 
on a mission to his native land in 1860, and on his way thither labored 
in the Southampton (Great Britain) Conference one year. During this 
mission he suffered considerable hardship. In the spring of 1865 he 
was called to go to Sanpete during the Indian troubles. After he re- 
turn he acted as Clerk in the General Tithing Office, Salt Lake City, 
where he served about 7 years; after which he came to Provo and was 
employed in the Provo Woolen Mills, where he served 8 or 9 years, 
and acted for some time as County Treasurer. He was subsequently 
called to go on a mission to Great Britain. After laboring there near- 
ly a year he was honorably released on account of ill health. 

On April 28th last he was taken seriously ill, and died on Sunday, 
May 4th, leaving a large family to mourn his departure, and a host of 
friends who deeply sympathize with the bereaved. 

"Surely a good man has gone, 
A loving father and true friend. " 

( Copied from Newspaper Clipping ) 



AN ELM TREE'S HISTORY OF 68 YEARS 
Rhea Dixon Reeve 

It seems to me that I should appreciate being a tree. 

God created trees according to His plan, that we might give beauty and 
be useful to man. 

He gave us myriads of colorful leaves that rustle and sigh in the cool- 
ing breeze. 

I, the Elm, am very old, and I have seen much that should be told. 

I'm a survivor of an age forever gone, although recollections and fond 
memories linger on. 

God made me a body so straight and strong; gave me endurance , dura- 
bility, and made my life long. 

I have faithfully stood for many long years; witnessed much joy, sor- 
row and fears. 

The Associations I have known, bring me memories sweet. I have 
lived a well spent life, but now I have happiness complete 

For a little bird has the secret told, that I'm to be honored tho' I'm 
withered and old. 

The Daughters of my friends, the worthy pioneers, have been showing 

appreciation for old timers for years. 
They have chosen to honor my brother and me , by placing a plaque for 

all passers-by to see. 
We trees only ask for appreciation and sympathy; I'm happy for the 

honor that has come to me, 
And as is customary among pioneers, to relate stories of loved ones 

that have gone with the years, 
I, too, have a story I'd like to tell, to show gratitude for those who 

served me well. 

I give credit first of all, for my health, my stature, and branches tall, 

To Henry Aldous Dixon, a man good and true, an Englishman from 
South Africa to Utah he came; his faith and good works have bro't 
honor to the family name. 

He loved things of beautyjplants , flowers, and trees; so he planted me, 
a sapling, securely among these. 

He nurtured and watched me, took great pride in my growth; my wel- 
fare the family guarded like an oath. 

This green well kept corner has always been my home; folks return 
and find me standing here, no matter where they roam. 

I've watched over the Dixon homestead day after day; how well I re- 
member, when the father went away 

To the England he loved, and during his stay, while he preached the 
Gospel in his convincing way, 

His family suffered hardships, illness, and fear, 

But they were blessed with kind neighbors from far and near, 

I was surprised one cold morning, to find mush ice all around, 



91 



92 



AN ELM TREE'S HISTORY OF 68 YEARS 



The mill race had flooded all over the ground. 

Prisoners were we until a kind neighbor, our plight did see, 

He came to our rescue; everyone was glad when that winter was thru. 

Springtime brought wild buttercups to the ditch bank close by 

The lilac trees in blossom near the cottonwoods so high. 

The mulberries the children enjoyed so much, 

The bed of peppermint, my roots seemed to touch; 

The rows of sage useful for seasoning and tea, 

Always held a fascination for me. 

The pink climbing roses, the red velvet ones too, 

Added beauty and fragrance to the view. 

Our red-haired gardner spent many hours, 

Admiring and cultivating his beautiful flowers. 

He worked energetically day after day, 

At the Woolen Mills, a block away. 

His fellow workers walked home with him, and would linger awhile 

neath the shade of my branches, which caused me to smile. 
Now as in every story, some dark clouds appear, 
We lost brother Dixon in his 49th year. 
The sad news caused many a sigh and tear, 
The sad, sweet tolling of the bell, for each year, 
He had lived so well 

Seemed like a benediction and farewell. 
How well I remember that balmy spring day 
When his friends in the Priesthood laid him away. 
They carried him past me and down the long street. 
On reaching the Tabernacle, the journey was complete. 
After the services, his loved ones sorrowfully came home, 
To carry on the best they could 
And like him, practice doing good. 

Three weeks later, even before her tears were dried, 
I was startled when the new baby cried. 

And they called him Arnold, and placed him by Sarah's side. 
He proved to be a comfort and joy 

Helped solace his mother's grief, for he was her last baby boy. 
E're long Aunt Mary and her children moved away. 

This didn't sever family ties, they're all for one and one for all in 

What they do and say. 
It seems a tradition that it was to be 

We Elm trees were a branch of the Dixon Family tree. 

John DeGrey, the first born, with Sarah Lewis, his bride, 
Came to the old Dixon home to reside. 



AN ELM TREE'S HISTORY OF 68 YEARS 



93 



Henry Aldous , the II, uttered his first lusty cry, 
In the same adobe house, with me still standing by. 
This boy brought honor to the family name. 
I stand tall with pride when I hear of his fame. 

Marie Louise, better known as Aunt Rye, valiant as any Pioneer 

Gave birth to her first born while living here. 

Another red-head - - -Arthur D. , 

A finer fellow you'll never see. 

Sincere in fostering the Gospel plan, 

Missionary, Bishop, and a good, kind man. 

I learned to love these red-haired lads, 

I am as proud of them as I was of their Dads. 

Ernest and Charles bought a home right near. 

When I look at Ernest, it seemed to me 

Such a resemblance to his Father I could see. 

Parley and William lived close by, 

To be close to the old home, they did try. 

Walter DeGrey, a younger son, 

Brought the bride he had won 

To live in the old home near the Elm trees. 

He loved the flowers too, and the garden, and photographed these. 

He was always happy and liked people too. 

One of the finest men I ever knew. 

His first-born, a daughter, can remember 

How she liked to play with the children neath my branches, 

Until that terrible day, 

When an uninvited Indian aquaw frightened them away, 
Begging for their cookies, they misunderstood. 
Thinking she wanted them, they ran fast as they could. 
It was many a day, 

Before the little Dixon girl came outside to play. 

After Walter moved to his new home on Fifth West Street, 
Barretts from England I want you to meet 

Friends of Grandfather Dixon, they were part of this family, 

Came to the old home near him to be. 

And more loyal friends could ne'e re be found. 

Their granddaughter, Tillie, lives on this lot today, 

She has built a lovely, modern home, and the old home has been taken 
away. 

She protected us trees, and majestic we stand, 



94 



AN ELM TREE'S HISTORY OF 68 YEARS 



Altho' the others have been destroyed, we Elms seem to belong to this 

choice land. 
Tillie, herself, so ambitious and neat, 

Keeps her place spic and span; it's an asset to Third West Street. 

And tho 1 I miss the old mill whistle, that fire stilled many years ago, 

And the old familiar faces, the ones I used to know, 

And altho' I am a survivor of an age forever gone, 

I'm glad that God keeps me growing, and my life goes on and on. 

There's much more to tell from my book of life. 

For I've seen much joy, sorrow, and strife. 

When I die, as all living things do, 

I hope I shall grow eternally with good folks like all of you. 



Written by Rhea Dixon Reeve for the marking of the Elm Tree, 
which was planted by her Grandfather Henry Aldous Dixon on the old 
homesite, corner of Second North and Third West Street, Provo, Utah, 
68 years ago. 



October 15, 1943 



THE OLD DIXON ELM TREE 
Corner of Third West & Second North 
Planted in 1875 by Henry A. Dixon 
94 years old (1969) 



COPY OF HENRY A. DIXON'S WILL 



Provo City, Utah Terry. 
27 Oct. 1879 

In the name of God Amen, 

I, Henry A. Dixon of Provo City, being of sound mind and body, do 
make and declare this my last will and testament in manner and form 
following: 

First I give and bequeth to my wife Sarah DeGrey, the farm sit- 
uated in Sec. 36 on Provo River described as follows: 



To have and to hold during her natural life at her death to revert 
to her sons; also one half (^) of investment in Provo Mfg. Co. , U. C. C. 
Stock Ass'n. & in Provo East Store. Also 25 sheep in Rd. Pay's herd, 
one span of horses and wagon, 3 cows for her exclusive benefit. Also 
to my wife Mary Smith, the farm on Provo Bench in Sec. 24, at her 
death to revert to her sons; also half interest in factory, herd and in 
East Store; 2 cows, 25 sheep in Rd. Pay's herd for her exclusive ben- 
efit. 

To my wife Sarah's children, two lots with buildings thereon in 
3rd Bps. Wd. , being lots Plat Provo City. To my wife Mary's 
children, all of my bees, also 20 acres of land situated on Provo Ben- 
ch Sec. After defraying expenses out of all other property, the 
residue in whatever kind to all my children equally, after paying ex- 
penses of administration of Estate, save the Slate Kanyon Farm in Sec. 

which I herewith bequeath to Sarah DeGrey and Mary Smith, My 
wives, at their death to revert to their children. 

I do hereby constitute and appoint Sarah DeGrey, Executrix and 
David Mitchel and John Francom, Executors of this my last will and 
te stament. 

In witness whereof I have thereunto set my hand and seal the day 
and year as above written. 

/S/ HENRY A. DIXON 

The above sheet instrument of one sheet was now here subscribed 
by H. A. Dixon, the testator, in the presence of each of us and was at 
the same time declared by him to be his last will and testament. And 
we, at his request, sign our names as attesting witness. 

/S/ Sarah Dixon residing at Provo 
David Mitchell " Payson 
John Francom " Payson 



95 



RE - NEW AL OF FAMILY TIES IN SOUTH AFRICA 



With the death of Grandfather Dixon's sister, Anne, on March 28, 
1877, just 3 years after the death of their father John Henry Dixon, 
all contacts with the Dixon Family in South Africa ceased. Some of 
the letters written to Anne by Henry A. Dixon were returned at that 
time, five of them having been enlarged and reproduced recently. 

Our Dixon Family records were so incomplete in 1930 that the 
only records available were the date and place of birth of Henry A. 
Dixon and the name of his mother, father and sister. 

So in May 1930 when my mission call for the California Mission 
was changed to the South African Mission, I was overjoyed. And I 
think it was an answer to my Mother's prayers that a representative 
of the Dixon Family be sent to the birthplace of her father. 

Upon landing at Capetown and the Mission Home at Mowbray, I 
was immediately placed in the Mission Office and after two months 
training was assigned as Mission Secretary. This was disappointing 
for it now tied me down to a desk with little chance for genealogical 
contacts. Typical of my Mother's faith, she counselled me to do my 
assigned job thoroughly and to the best of my ability and if I did that, 
the way would be opened for me to obtain that information which she 
and I so much desired. 

On April 30, 1931 at "Cumorah" Main & Grove Road, Mowbray, 
South Africa, The South African Mission Headquarters and Mission 
Home, I recorded the following thoughts: 

On September 15, 1930, I left my home and beloved one's at Provo 
and Salt Lake City, Utah, to answer a call to fullfill a Mission for the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, in South Africa, the 
former home and birthplace of Grandfather Henry Aldous Dixon. 75 
years before, he had left his home, his beloved parents and sister 
and friends, to sacrifice all for the love of the convictions of his mind 
and heart; to go to America, Utah, to help build up the great kingdom. 

Little knowledge did I have of any ancestors or friends, for no de- 
tailed record had been kept, concerning the whereabouts of My Grand- 
father's family and their children. Yet within six months, through 
the help and guidance of Our Heavenly Father, I have been guided to 
the door of a total stranger, who upon conversing and searching proves 
to be one of my relatives here in South Africa. "God moves in a my- 
sterious way, His wonders to perform". This work of genealogy, that 
of collecting and linking up our family histories, is one of the greatest 
and most important works of the Lord in this the latter day. 

It being the 29th of April and the end of the month, the time that 
is busiest in the office, I felt that I should stay in the office and do 
my work. I had previously told the Elders this when they inquired if I 
was going out tracting with them. After going to the office and outlin- 
ing my days activities, I decided that they could wait until afternoon or 



96 



RE-NEWAL OF FAMILY TIES IN SOUTH AFRICA 



97 



the next day. None of it being exceptionally important or rushing . So 
I went tracting, really against my own convictions. 

How it was that Elder Peterson and Elder Harris took the oppos- 
ite side of the road and Elder Mac Arthur and myself the right side, 
is beyond my power of comprehension and reason. After tracting ab- 
out six houses with fairly good conversations, we entered "Kenthurst". 
We knocked at the door, asked for the misses and waited. The maid 
reappeared and asked the names - we waited. Were asked to come in 
by the maid but refused. It not being in order to accept the invitation 
from a servant. Still we waited and finally the lady of the house came 
in from the back yard. She evidently had been working in the garden. 
We waited while she washed her hands. She finally appeared and we de- 
livered our message or approach. She was not interested whatsoever. 
She had her Religion, Church of England, which was good enough forher. 

She happened to mention that one of her father's uncles was a 
Mormon. I then told her the story of my Grandfather, of his being 
born and raised in Africa, after which he went to Utah. Upon men- 
tioning his only sister as being Anne Hartman, she immediately gave 
me the startling news of her relationship to the Hartman's of Cradock. 
What good news! How my heart and soul thrilled! Just imagine the 
possibility of finding relatives, someone that knew my Grandfather's 
family history; which was more or less a blank page to his family in 
Utah. Here I am no longer alone. I have found kinsmen and the pos- 
sibility of helping to fulfill one of my Mother's grandest hopes and 
dreams . 

I asked if I might have the privilege of coming back some evening 
and talking more about the family tree. She answered in the affirmative, 
also stating she would write to Willie Hartman, who was living then at 
Cradock and was very ill and in a critically sick condition. I suggest- 
ed coming around before mail day (letter writing day), and was given 
the invitation of calling Thursday, April 20th. 

As I was leaving I inquired as to her name and found it to be Mrs. 
Humphris, living at Kenthurst on Banska Road, Rosebank (a suburb 
of Cape Town. ) 

Thursday evening at 8:00 p.m. , Elder Peterson accompanied me 
back to the home of Mrs. Humphris. I took with me Grandfather's 
Diary and also the pictures and letters from home. In the last mail 
I had received the histories of Grandfather Dixon and also Grand- 
mother Eliza Taylor. 

I took these histories, pictures and diary along and showed them 
and read them to Mrs. Humphris, Mr. Humphris (who is blind and 
without the use of his limbs), Miss Humphris, and another young man. 

We were greeted with a very friendly welcome and made to feel 
at home. I had just read the letters, taken from Grandmother Dixon's 



98 



RE-NEWAL OF FAMILY TIES IN SOUTH AFRICA 



box at Aunt Electa's. I showed them some of these letters and the 
pictures sent me. Mrs. Humphris located her album and showed me 
the picture of Miss Nash, who married Ben Webber, and also a num- 
ber of his sisters as well as some of the other persons spoken of in 
Anne Hartman's letters to Grandfather, which we were just reading. 

Mrs. Humphris remembers her mother, Mrs. Hamlin, who was 
Ben Webber's sister Harriet, telling her that her mother, Emma 
Dixon, told the story of having been left in care of some friends 
while her mother went to England to get some money, but was never 
heard of after that. As near as we can work it out (nothing definite) 
Emma Dixon must have been the half sister of Henry Aldous Dixon, my 
Grandfathe r . 

(Most recent records show that Margaret W. Dixon, first wife of 
John Henry Dixon, was buried at Grahamstown, C. P. South Africa, 
by the Rev. William Geary on June 21, 1824.) 



Clarence D. Taylor 



SOUTH AFRICAN RELATIVES 



William Hartman 



David T. Mc Cloed Florence Mc Cloed Hartman 



Charles H. Humphris 



Laura Hamlin Humphris 



Laura Hamlin Humphris 



Joan Humphris Helen Humphris 












/ 







-7" 0~7^3<^' 








/ 



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104 



HENRY A. DIXON TRAVELS & IMPORTANT DATES 



March 14, 18 35 Born at Grahamstown, C. P. South Africa 

1850 Into Kerlies Native Country, beyond the confines of 



British Territory to return stolen cattle. 
March 14, 1856 Baptized at Uitenhage , C. P. , South Africa 
Nov. 1, 1856 Sailed from Port Elizabeth for London, England 

on board brig "Unity". 
Jan 1 12, 1857 Arrived in London, England. 

Feb. 3, 1857 Left Liverpool, England on ship "Geo. Washington". 
March 1857 Arrived at Boston, Massachusettes . Travelled in 

rail cars to Iowa City. 
Drove an ox team 1500 miles across the plains. 
Sept. 12, 1857 Arrived in Great Salt Lake City. 

27, 1857 To Echo Canyon Narrows - To combat Johnston's 
Army. 

December 1857 Sent to Washington Settlement - Dixie Cotton 

Project. 

April 26, I860 Left Great Salt Lake City on Mission to Africa 

via England. 
Camped at mouth of Parley's Canyon 
27, Camped at head of Parley's Canyon 

29, Camped within \ mile of Weber River. 

30, Up Weber Canyon to Chalk Creek. 
May 1, Crossed Chalk Creek several times. 

2, Crossed Chalk Creek over 20 times today. 

3, Stopped at noon at Bear River. Camped on Creek. 

4, Travelled as far as Muddy. 

5, Crossed Muddy, camped on small creek (8000Ft. ). 

6, New road, camped near Muddy. 

7, Camped at Black's Fork. 

8, Camped at Ham's Fork. 

9, Camped at Green River. 

10, Camped at Big Sandy. 

11, Camped on Sandy. 

12, Noon at crossing of Little Sandy. Camped on 17 miles 

13, Watered at Pacific Creek. Camped on Sweetwater, 

2 miles from South Pass. 

14, Camped on east side of Sweetwater. Took Siminole 

cutoff. 

15, Camped at Antelope Hollow. 

16, Camped at a good spring. 

17, Camped on Sweetwater. 

18, Camped after crossing Sweetwater. 

19, Camped on Sweetwater. 

20, Camped on Sweetwater \\ miles from Devil's Gate. 



105 



106 HENRY A. DIXON TRAVELS & IMPORTANT DATES 

May 21, 1860 Camped on Greeswood Creek. Passed Devil's Gate, 

Independence Rock, Salurates Lake. 

22, Camped on Willow Creek. 

23, Camped on a small creek, 6 mi. from Platte Bridge. 

24, Camped on Platte. 

30, Camped on Dry Camp. 

1 31, Camped on Platte. 

June 1, 1860 Camped on Platte, 3 miles from Laramie. 

5, Camped at Scott's Bluff. 

6, Camped at Chimney Rock 

10, Camped on Large Castle Creek. 

11, Camped otherside of Wolf Creek. 

12, Camped on Rattlesnake Creek for noon. 
15, Camped at Cold Spring. 

18, Took Pioneer Road. 

19, Nooned at Buffalo Creek. 

Camped on Slough, passed Elm Creek. 

20, Camped on Wood Rivers. 

22, Camped on Platte with Wagon & Handcart Co. 

23, Camped on Platte. Passed 200 Cheyenne Warriors. 

25, Camped opposite Genoa. 

26, Wagons ferried across South Fork. 
Camped at night near ferry. 

27, Camped at noon at Cleveland. 

28, Camped for night at Columbus. 

29, Camped for night at Freemont. 

30, Camped other side of Rawhide Creek. 

July 1, I860 Arrived at Florence. Found 80 African Saints. 

2, Waiting for boat at Florence. 

3, Went to Omaha. 

6, Left on Steamer "Emile". 

7, Arrived at St. Joseph. 

8, Arrived at Hannibal by cart. 

Took steamer "Die Vernon" for St. Louis. 

9, Arrived at St. Louis. Took train for Chicago. 

10, Boarded steamboat "Ogdensburgh" screw at 

Chicago. 

11, Arrived at Milwaukee, via Chicago River, Lake 

Michigan. 

12, Arrived at Mackinaw Island into Lake Huron. 

13, Arrived at St. Claire River. 

14, Arrived at Detroit. Crossed Lake St. Clair 

up the Detroit River. 



HENRY A. DIXON TRAVELS & IMPORTANT DATES 



107 



July 15, 1860 Sailed on Lake Erie, to the Canadian Welland Canal 

at Port Colburn thru the 26 locks to St. Cather- 
ina and Port Dalhouse. 

16, Sailed across Lake Ontario down the St. Lawrence 

River to Cape Vincent. Took train for Albany, 
N. Y. Left Albany by steamboat down Hudson 
1 River. 

17, Arrived New York City. 

Aug. 2, Left New York docks on packet ship "Middlesex" 

14, 000 tons. Tapscott Line. 

24, In Irish Channel. 

25, Landed at Liverpool, England. 

Sept. 3, Left Liverpool. Visited Chester, Wexam, Shrews- 

bury, Woverampton, Birmingham, Warwick, Ban- 
bury, Didcot, Reading. 
5, Arrived Southampton. 

10, At Farnam, Surry. 

11, To Aldershott, Guilford. 

13, At Havant. Walked to Chichester. 

14, Bosham, Ernswoth. Left for Portsmouth. 

15, In Lanport. 

19, At Basingstoke. Walked to Mortimer. Took train 

to Reading. 

20, Bricklebury Common, Coalahs, Newbury. 

24, At Wodburn Green, Buckingham, Windsor, Slough, 

Her sham, Reading. 
28, In Farnham, Guilford, Portsmouth. 

Oct. 4, In Southampton. 

8, At Nettly. 

11, To Winchester, Pitt, Ramsey. 

13, To Newton, Saulsbury. 

14, To Redlynch, Fording Bridge, Ferndown. 

16, In Brockelhurst, Minsted, Southampton. 

27, In Dorset Conference. 

28, At Redlynch. 

Aug. 5, 1861 At Cold Ash, England 

7, At Hamp stead. 

8 , At Ogburne 

11, At Aldbourne . 

12, At Newbury. 

17, Arrived at Waterloo Station, London. 
19, In Chelsea. 

Sept. 7, Boarded sailing vessel "Sydney" 

8, Sailed down Thames River. 

Dec. 16, Arrived Table Bay, South Africa. Out to Mowbray. 



108 HENRY A. DIXON TRAVELS & IMPORTANT DATES 

Dec. 18, 1861 Visited at Wineburgh, CP. South Africa 

20, At Newlands. 

21, On Cape Flats. 

24, To Belvedere, Capetown. 

27, To Calk Bay, Simonstown. 

30, Up to Devil's Peak, Table Mountain, Caulk- Bay. 

Jan. 12, 1862 Boarded steamer "Sir Geo. Grey" for Port Eliz. 
16, Arrived at Port Elizabeth. 

18, To Uitenhage on borrowed horse. 

20, Return to Port Elizabeth. 

27, To Grahamstown. 

King Williams Town 
Elands Post 
Winterberg 
Marsdorp 
Adelaide 
Fort Jackson 
Bongola 
East London 
Que ens town 
Burger's Dorp 
Fort Beaufort 
Leave Port Elizabeth for Durban, Isipingo. 
Leave Port Elizabeth on "Susan Pardue" for 

New York and Utah. 
Return to Salt Lake from Mission to South Africa. 
Sent to Sanpete County to engage in Blackhawk Indian 
War. 

Employed in General Tithing Office at Salt Lake City. 
Married Sarah DeGrey in Salt Lake Endowment House 
Henry Alfred Dixon born at Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Henry Alfred Dixon died at Salt Lake City, Utah. 
John DeGrey Dixon was born at Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Married Mary Anne Smith in Salt Lake End. House. 
Timpanogos Mfg. Co. organized at Provo, Utah 
Arthur DeGrey Dixon born at Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Alice Smith Dixon born at Salt Lake City, Utah 
Ground broken for Provo Woolen Mills on ground 

purchased from John Taylor. 
Moved family to Provo. 
Sarah Ann Dixon born at Provo, Utah. 
Maria Louise Dixon born at Provo, Utah. 
Timpanogos Mfg. Co. was incorporated with Henry 
A. Dixon as Secretary. (Provo Woolen Mills) 



Feb. 


23, 


1863 


April 


10, 


1864 






1864 


Spring 


of 


1865 


1864 




1871 


Jan. 


21, 


1865 


Nov. 


14, 


1865 


July 


1, 


1867 




16, 


1867 


April 


13, 


1869 


June 


1, 


1869 


Oct. 


5, 


1869 


April 


29, 


1870 


May 




1870 






1871 


Dec. 


7, 


1871 


Jan. 


5, 


1872 






1872 



HENRY A. DIXON TRAVELS & IMPORTANT DATES 



109 



1872 Henry A. Dixon purchased lot from William Harrison 
who purchased it from A. O. Smoot. ( Z. C. M. I. 
lot on Uni v. Ave. & 6th South, Provo) 



A r-i T» 1 1 

x\pni 


7 1 
CI , 


18 7^ 


w miam Aiaous uixon oorn at rrovo, utan 


ue c . 


77 


1 QT-J 
lo 1 J 


jLinesx ueurey uixon oorn at rrovo, utaJi 


-£i- LJ X XX 


1 

1 > 


1 874 


u viiii xxcux y j_j iJvun , 1 1 1 iduic r uicu in ouuui xxirxcci 


IN O V . 


1 u, 


1 ft 74. 
lo It 


i\ooert omiin uixon oorn at Jrrovo, utan 


-L/C \, . 


l 8 

J. o , 


1 8 74 

X O I ^ 


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r\Tov 

IN \J V • 


22 


1 875 


fin's 7*1 a c l)"\T7#--n riiYnn V* n t*ti +• Pr n^rrt TTt^oVi 
OilallC B \-S WCIJ. J_/xAOIx U<J X IX cL L X I UVU, ULd.il 


Ivlar . 


31 

_>X , 


1876 


Albert F" 1 red rifle DiYOn horn at Prnvo TTtab 


NTo v 


15 


1877 

x. w 1 1 


AA/alter DpHrpv nivnn Viorn at" Prnvn TTtaVi 

V V CL X X X-/ w VJ X C y J t IAU UU 1 H dt i IVJVv, W 1>CLXX 


Tnnp 


9 


1878 


Parlpv Smith Divon Vinrn at Prnvn TTtaVi 

X a, 1 It V k_/ XX XX Lll J — ' iAvll UU 1 li CL L X X V-/ V w , w L.CLXX 


Oct 


Q 

7 


1879 


T .e f t for Mi s tiififi to Pn o1 anH 

J 1 L 1U1 1V1JO 3 lull LU K ^ ^ 


Nov 

X^l w V • 




1880 


ArrivpH home from IVTi-s-jion to TTncrlanH 

XX. X X X V <-l llvll . v.. X X w 111 XVX X O O 1VJU U Xjll CL X CLXXVX 








fill Health) 






1880 


A s^t T\ oolclcp p np t* f o t T-Tp n rv D inwooH v T^iiTri do 

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1 881 


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\J ct . 


1 o, 


1 RR1 


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April 


1U, 


1 ft ft 7 

1 O O 6 


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188? 

J. O O 6 


XX • XX. . J—/ 1AU11 111 LC 1 VIC W CU 1VJ 1 iVlctll d X XT X V-/ V \J J-J X . 


May 




1 ft ft"? 
1 o o u 


narriet Airieiia uixon oorn at rrovo, utan 


oe pt. 


71 

6 / , 


1 ft ft 3 


Zj . v-# , ivx. i. Warcnousc ixcctxxy coixipxc tea . v^urrcntiy 








carrying a limited line 01 staple groceries. 


Ton 


4 


1 884 


T?i r1 ^» 1 7*o*;rc! T,p"i;ia T-Ta 1 1 R V A raHpmv 

X 11 C UC D Ll U y O XJC W X O X X CL X X XJ • X • XJL v^dUC Illy , 


March 


10, 


1884 


Z.C.M.I. building completed as far as planned. 








Cost $11, 134. 11. 


April 


5, 


1884 


B. Y. Academy requested permission to use the 








Z. CM. I. Building. 


April 


28, 


1884 


Henry A. Dixon stricken with pneumonia, 


May 


4, 


1884 


Henry Aldous Dixon died at Provo, Utah 


May 


30, 


1884 


Arnold Dixon born at Provo, Utah 



Fez 



Taodeni 
Wadan • 



Walata [ [Timbuktu 
Goa 



Ghana 
~Mali ' 



% 

Djenne* 



Tunis 
Tripoli 



Tekro 



;A F R i c 



Kano 



Cairo 




Lowe: 



Egypt 



Upper Egypt 



Ethiopia 

Somalia ' 




X Ken ya 
d 

C on go Basin j Lake Nya sa , 



( 



Cape Towrr 



Mowbrayj 
^rmonstown: 



J oh annes hur g 

Durban 
Isipingb 

r JjEast^London 

cCTadock 

Grabjnstqwn 
/ Bathurst, 

/ Uitenhage 

Port .Elizabeths 



110 



SOUTH AFRICAN MILEAGE CHART 
Distance in miles between the following: 



Capetown to Bloemfontein, South Africa 75 Miles 

11 Cape Flats » 7 11 

" Durban, Natal 11 (Sea) 822 " 

" " " (Rail) 1,253 " 

" East London " (Sea) 569 " 

" (Rail) 887 » 

" Johanesburg " 956 " 

n Kalk Bay " 17 " 

" Kimberly " 647 " 

11 Made ria Islands 4,673 " 

11 Mowbray South Africa 3j " 

" Newlands " 6 M 

" Port Elizabeth " (Sea) 433 " 

" 11 " (Rail) 664 " 

" Pretoria " 1,001 " 

" St. Helena Islands 1,697 " 

" Simonstown South Africa 22j " 

" Wine berg " 8 " 

Port Elizabeth, So. Africa to Addo South Africa 31 " 

11 " Adelaide 11 169 " 

" " Aliwal North " 581 " 

" " Bloemfontein " 450 " 

" " Burgherdorp " 545 11 

" " Cradock 11 183 " 

" " Durban, Natal "( Sea) 384 " 

" " " "(Rail) 955 " 

" 11 East London " (Sea) 133 " 

11 " " "(Rail) 301 " 

" " Fort Beaufort " 196 " 

" " Fort Jackson " 319 " 

" " Graaf Reinet " 185 " 

11 " Grahamstown " 106 " 

" " Johannesburg " 712 " 

11 " King Williamstown " 25 9 " 

" " New York, U.S.A. (Sea) 6,807 " 

" " Queenstown, So. Africa 455 " 

" " Somerset East " 147 " 

11 " Uitenhage " 21 " 



111 



SOUTH AFRICAN MILEAGE CHART (Con't) 



Distance in miles between the following; 



Grahamstown, South Africa to Bathurst, So. Africa 34 Miles 

" 11 Port Alfred " 43 " 

" Adelaide " 63 » 

» 11 Capetown " 770 " 

» " Cradock " 185 " 

" 11 Durban (via E. L. (sea) 401 " 

" 11 East London, So. Africa 148 11 

" " Fort Beaufort " 40 " 

" " Isipingo (via E. L. (sea) 390 " 

" 11 King Williamstown, So. Afr. 80 " 

" " Port Elizabeth, So. Africa 106 " 

11 " Queenstown " " 349 " 

" " Somerset East " " 148 " 

" " Uitenhage " " 120 » 

Durban, Natal, South Africa to Bloemfontein, So. Africa 503 " 

" 11 East London (via sea) 253 " 

" " " (via rail) 905 " 

" 11 Isipingo, Natal, South Africa 

(Noon Bros. Sugar Plantation) 11 " 

" 11 Jjohansesburg, So. Africa 417 " 

" " Ladysmith " 11 161 » 

11 " Maritzburg " » 56 " 

11 11 Pietermaritzburg " 73 " 



112 



BIOGRAPHY OF SARAH DE GREY DIXON 



By Maria Dixon Taylor 

Sarah DeGrey was born in the town of Dudley, England, February 
4 , 1844. She was the youngest child of John and Maria DeGrey. She 
had four sisters and one brother. Her father was a tailor by trade, 
and it kept him very busy to make a living. 

Dudley was a coal camp, surrounded by green rolling hillsides. 
Upon one of these could be seen the Dudley Castle, of which the people 
were very proud. 

The DeGrey children spent many happy hours near the walls of 
this structure, which many years previous had been the home of an 
Earl. The family hadn't joined any Church but were of a very honest 
and moral character. Their home was a most happy home. When 
Sarah was about eight years of age, this part of England was aroused 
by the news that there were missionaries from Utah preaching a very 
strange religion. 

One afternoon a cousin, who was a dress-maker, of Maria DeGrey 
called at her home and made known to her that a meeting would be 
held in Dudley by these peculiar people. Maria out of curiosity attend- 
ed and to her surprise was much impressed by the teachings she heard. 
Later these missionaries visited her home. John Hall, who was Pres- 
ident of the Conference, made frequent calls to the DeGrey home. The 
result being that he had the privilege of baptizing the family. Persecu- 
tion was apparent on all sides, so Pres. Hall chose night as the proper 
time to perform this ordinance. 

One moonlight evening in a pond nearby, Brother Hall carrying 
Sarah in his arms down into the water, baptizing her, in the presence 
of members of the family. As soon as the DeGreys joined the Church , 
the desire came to go to the land of Zion, but they didn't have the mon- 
ey. The father being dead, made it even harder for them;but Widow De- 
Grey having much faith and being a devoted mother, got along as 
well as could be expected. John Hall very kindly assisted in selling 
the household goods and etc, receiving enough money to pay the pas- 
sage to America, for the mother and four daughters: Kezia, Charlotte, 
Maria and Sarah. 

In the meantime, John Hall, age 30, by permission of the Church, 
had married Selena, the oldest of the DeGrey girls. They remained in 
England, as did the brother Alfred. The rest took the train for Liver- 
pool, where they set sail on the ship "Well Fleet" bound for Boston. 

It was in the month of June 1856 when they sailed. The weather 
was beautiful, the sea being so calm that none of them experienced 
sea sickness. They were able to enjoy their meals, which consisted of 
salt bacon, beef, sea biscuits, etc. Sometime the waiters would give 
them lumps of brown sugar, which they would dip in vinegar , making a 
very tasty luxury. Water was not good. The water barrels being filled 



113 



114 



BIOGRAPHY OF SARAH DE GREY DIXON 



at England. Before they got across the ocean, the water smelled bad. 
Still it was all they had, and they had to use it. It was very interesting 
to be on this large sailing vessel. The children spent much time on 
deck, where they could watch the sailors climb the masts and govern 
the ship, and see the funny porpoise jumping up and down in the water. 
They also saw whales in the distance spurting water. The sailors some- 
times would take a swim in the sea, it being so calm. Thus they really 
enjoyed the trip across the great Atlantic, even though it required six 
weeks. Many and varied were their experiences during this trip and 
they are among the not-to-be -forgotten memories of the DeGrey family. 
They landed at Boston in July 1856. 

Mother DeGrey and children were now strangers in a strange land, 
without funds. They felt pretty blue for a time. One day to their sur- 
prise a girl friend of Kezia met and invited them to her home at Chel- 
sea across the bay. They felt very grateful and spent many pleasant 
days at this home. It was necessary to scatter out and work. Each of 
the girls was placed in a different home. Sarah was sent to the home 
of an old Minister, several miles out of Boston. The old Minister 
and his wife lived alone and Sarah became very homesick for her 
mother and sisters. This was the first time she had ever been sep- 
arated from her mother. She became so sick that she was put to bed. 
She could not eat the old dry crusts which they brought her, the grapes 
she could. She became so weak that they sent word to the mother. 

Mother DeGrey explained the situation of her sick baby girl, to 
her employer, Mr. Coburn, who agreed with her that her eleven year 
old girl should be brought where her mother could take care of her. 
Mr. Coburn, a Boston shoe merchant, was a very kind man, and was 
very appreciative of the good work and the splendid influence Mother 
DeGrey had brought into his home. He told her to bring her little girl, 
Sarah, to his home, for she would be a fine companion for his little 
eleven year old daughter. The Coburns became so fond of Sarah, aft- 
er being with them for eight months, they wanted to adopt her and 
give her the finest of clothes and education and make a fine lady of her. 
She and her mother thanked Mr. Coburn for his generous offer, but 
they wanted to live together as a family and it was to be out West in 
Utah. 

After living at Boston for nine months, the family had saved $112. 
to be used for their further journey West. When it became known the 
DeGreys intent to leave, the Bostonians tried to persuade them not to 
take such a dangerous trip. They told them of stories of the Wild Ind- 
ians that roamed the plains, and also informed them that Johnston's 
Army was to be sent to destroy the people in Utah 

John Hall and wife, Selena arrived at Boston on the ship "George 
Washington". They had made the trip in twenty-one days, a record in 
those days. This caused much talk in Boston. John, having met with 
an accident on the ship, was compelled to spend a week in Boston in 



BIOGRAPHY OF SARAH DEGREY DIXON 



115 



order to get in proper condition for the long journey before him. At 
the appointed time the little company, nine in number started on their 
westward journey (April 185 7). They took the train as far as the Mis- 
souri River. It was the supposed border line of civilization. Arriving 
at Iowa City they purchased their equipment, which consisted of a yoke 
of cows, a yoke of steers, and a covered wagon. They were ferried 
across the river on a flat boat and travelled on to Florence where 
they joined the main company, which was fully organized with Jesse 
Martin as Captain. The long train of covered wagons commenced the 
journey. They travelled from 15 to 21 miles a day and stopped where- 
ever they could find suitable camp and feeding places near a creek or 
river. 

Sarah was now a fine built girl of twelve. She was of a very plea- 
sant nature and assisted much in making it pleasant for her associates. 
She and a girl companion especially attracted the attention of Captain 
Martin, who invited them to run along side of his horse, while he sear- 
ched for a new camp ground. They going ahead of the Company, would 
sing to him and he appreciated it very much. After finding a desirable 
place, the girls would pick up"buffalo chips"while waiting for the Com- 
pany to arrive. The wagons would then form in the shape of a horse- 
shoe as a protection against invaders that might come to molest them. 
For there roamed on these plains the wolfe, coyote , buffalo and wild 
Indians. After preparing meals they would sit around the camp fires, 
and sing the songs of Zion. They were so thankful for a rest. Differ- 
ent men took turns in herding the cattle at night outside the enclosure. 
After all had retired it seemed very lonesome. At times they could 
hear the wolf and the coyotes howl. There was also danger in the 
buffalo causing a stampede among the cattle. There not being much 
room in the wagon, the girls did much walking. Running ahead they 
would gather flowers and have a good time. 

They could wade most of the streams, but when they came to a 
large river, like the Platte, they would hang onto the back of the 
wagon, and thus they got across all right. Upon one occasion after 
the DeGrey wagon crossed the Platte, the oxen and cows gave out. 
John Hall was left behind the wagon train. Sarah and her sister was 
running along singing and gathering flowers, when to their surprise 
they saw in the distance a band of Indians on horseback. They scam- 
pered back to the DeGrey wagon. Three or four of the Indians rode 
up, encircled the wagon, poked their black faces in front of the wo- 
men and children. They screamed and thought perhaps they would be 
destroyed, as the Bostonians had told them. Thanks to John Hall, 
who was brave and calm. He whipped the cattle, not paying any at- 
tention to the movements of these red skins, and told them there was 
a large Company ahead. The Indians rode on for a distance, and see- 
ing the camp ahead rode off. This was a great relief to Mother De- 



116 



BIOGRAPHY OF SARAH DEGREY DIXON 



Grey and family. They were glad to again join the Company which 
journeyed on unmolested. They came down Echo Canyon and viewed 
Salt Lake Valley. It was quite a contrast to the green lanes of Eng- 
land. 

The DeGreys arrived in Salt Lake in September 1857, Sarah had 
walked practically all the way across the plains. A distance of over 
one thousand miles. They all felt to praise God they were so happy 
and thankful to be in Zion. Excitement now prevailed as the people 
had received news of the coming of Johnston's Army. They camped in 
Echo Canyon that winter. The Martin Company was also glad to get in 
ahead of the Army; otherwise they would have been delayed a whole 
year. 

Maria DeGrey and family lived in the Eleventh Ward. Several 
years after their arrival in Utah, the older sisters married men who 
were called by Brigham Young to colonize the Dixie Country. This 
left Sarah and her Mother alone in their humble Utah home. It seem- 
ed that they became more attached to each other, than ever before. 
Henry A. Dixon, a brave young man, had driven a yoke of oxen in the 
Martin Company and had become acquainted somewhat with the older 
sisters. Sarah, being quite young, never took much notice of him. 
He had kept an eye on her and used to listen to her songs as he sat on 
the wagon tongue around the camp fires. 

After coming to Salt Lake, Henry was called on a five year mis- 
sion to his home land, Africa. Upon his return he made friendly vis- 
its to the DeGrey home. Sarah, now being a young lady of about 
twenty years, attracted his attention and their courtship ripened into 
love. They were married on January 21, 1865 and settled down to 
married life. He built a neat little log house on the same lot as 
Mother DeGrey 1 s house so that she could still have the close compan- 
ionship of her precious daughter. 

Henry, being a man of ability, secured a good position in the Tith- 
ing Office in Salt Lake City. Their home was a happy one and they 
continued to reside in Salt Lake City, until 1871. During this period 
of time, three children were born to them. Henry and Sarah were 
called upon to part with their first born. This was indeed a great 
sorrow to them. This, however, was the only incident which mared 
their otherwise happy home during their stay in Salt Lake. 

In 1870, the Woolen Mills having been established at Provo, 
Brigham Young sent Henry to this establishment as bookkeeper. He 
engaged Luke Cook ( a butcher) to build him an adobe house one block 
west of the factory, in Provo. It was a peculiar looking house. Arch- 
itecture seemed to be of second consideration, however it was a very 
happy home. 

In this humble home Sarah continued to live. It was the birthplace 



BIOGRAPHY OF SARAH DEGREY DIXON 



117 



of the remainder of her family. She was the mother of nine children 
and was permitted to raise them all to manhood and womanhood, except 
her first born. 

She deserved much credit for her noble effort in rearing so noble 
a family. Her husband was called upon to fill a mission to England in 
1880, and it certainly took a heap of courage to face the problems of 
supporting so many children. This she did without a murmer. She 
felt equal to any task as long as it was a noble one. After Henry re- 
turned home, he secured good employment. All went well and the fam- 
ily began to prosper. 

She was not permitted to enjoy this peaceful happiness for long. 
She was soon called upon to bear the bitterest sorrow of her life. He, 
who had been so noble and kind, who always brought into his home the 
peaceful, loving influence of a father, was called to leave the family 
circle. No one will ever know the feeling of the two widows, except 
those who have had to part with such a hero among men, and to face 
the responsibility of providing the necessities of life for a family of 
eight. 

Sarah was not alone in her grief. Her husband had previously ob- 
eyed the laws of polygamy , mar ried another wife and she also was left 
with a family to care for. 

Together they shared each others sorrows and with one heart, one 
purpose and one desire, they struggled for the physical, mental and 
moral development of the children he had left behind. One in love and 
one in discipline , they spared no effort to help each child grow and de- 
velop into good law abiding, God fearing citizens. How well they suc- 
ceeded let those who know their children be the judge. 

For a few years after the death of her husband, Sarah devoted 
most of her time to the care of her family. As the children became 
older, she spent part of her time working for the cause in which she 
found so much comfort and consolation. 

She was a teacher in the Relief Society of the Provo Third Ward 
for many years. She was also President of the Primary Association. 
In this capacity she labored for a number of years. In later years she, 
in connection with Grandma Taylor, devoted a large portion of her 
time to the cause of the sick, assisting when their services were need- 
ed and leaving their blessing for health and comfort in many homes. 

On July 4, 1908, she in company with her daughter-in-law, Electa 
Dixon, visited the land of her birth. She enjoyed the trip immensely. 
She returned home in company with her son LeRoy who had filled a 
two years mission in Great Britain. 

During her declining years, Grandma Dixon tasted the bitter as 
well as the sweet. Two of her sons, Arthur and Walter, perfect spec- 
imens of manhood, passed away. Several of her grandchildren were 
also taken. These sorrows she bore with fortitude. 



118 



BIOGRAPHY OF SARAH DE GREY DIXON 



In August 1922, her daughter-in-law died, leaving her son with a 
small family and an infant to care for. Grandma Dixon, although in 
her seventy-ninth year helped to share the responsibilities of this home. 
She seemed to receive new strength in this labor of love. The devotion 
and service she gave these motherless children was wonderful. Her life 
in Utah was certainly one of service. As a loyal cistizen she served her 
State. As a devoted wife and mother she served her husband and child- 
ren. In obeying the commandments of her Maker, she served her God. 
As long as there was life within her body there was a desire within her 
heart to continue her life of service, to her children. 

Her children were as follows: Henry Alfred, John DeGrey, Arthur 
DeGrey, Maria Louise Dixon Taylor, Ernest DeGrey, Charles Owen, 
Walter DeGrey, Le Roy and Arnold Dixon. 



Since this history was written, the subject of this sketch died 
April 17, 1926, being over 81 years of age. Disease incident to old 
age was the cause of her death. Also her eldest son, John DeGrey 
Dixon passed away October 4, 1923. His sudden death was caused 
from apolexy. On December 28, 1926, LeRoy was called home short- 
ly after his Mother. The whole community was shocked at this untime- 
ly death of these noble men who were loved by all. 

Now in 1945 her only living children are Maria Louise Dixon Taylor 
and Arnold Dixon. 



MOTHER 



To Mrs. Sarah DeGrey Dixon, at a Family Reunion, on her 
Seventy -fifth birthday, by her son WALTER D. DIXON 

Of all lives to us, there is no other 
Sweeter than that of our own dear Mother. 
Born of good parentage, who were ever in search 
To know how to live and join the true Church. 
So, when the missionaries came, this little band 
Gladly emigrated to this Promised Land. 

Upon leaving Dudley, there was some commotion 
In preparing for this trip across the great ocean. 
While on their voyage, they were filled with glee 
At so many strange sights for them to see. 
Upon reaching Boston, though only twelve, 
It fell to her lot to work hard and delve. 

To accumulate money she did her best, 

Thereby making it possible to come further West. 

The people discouraged them, saying that only a clown 

Would leave this good old Boston town. 

To take this hazardous trip against the foe 

Where only a few white people had ventured to go. 

Undaunted in Council Bluffs they joined the wagon trains 
For a thousand mile walk across the plains. 

Discouragements confronted them and when the days seemed long, 

She sang to the Captain her sweetest songs. 

Her cheerfulness assisted to gladden his heart, 

And made him feel more encouraged to make a new start. 

From the wagons she never scarcely strayed 

For buffaloes and Indians she was sore afraid. 

When streams were too deep for them to wade through 

They hung onto the wagon, - - it was the best thing to do. 

And her older Sister Maria, would say in tones sweet and low, 

"Hang on tight Sally, don't you dare let go. " 

At last she landed in Utah, her face full of smiles 
Even though she had walked these long thousand miles. 
You grew to be a beautiful woman and when proposals were offered 
your hand 

We are glad you chose HENRY A. DIXON of that valiant Pioneer 
Band. 



119 



120 



MOTHER 



You became our Mother and we will all agree, 
A better woman one never could see. 

As a member of the Church you have been true blue, 

Living a life most consistent, devoted and true. 

You have held fast to the iron rod, 

Which makes us more perfect and nearer to God. 

When in delicate places we have chanced to stand, 

You have always come forward with your helping hand. 

With a heart full of love, you have beautifully shown 

You consider Aunt Mary's Family like that of your own. 

For whenever in distress we have made a call, 

You have cheerfully responded to us all. 

Having a guardian like you, we must not fail 

For your path has been a more rugged trail. 

God bless you, dear Mother, at this your 75th year 

May your future path be full of sunshine, much joy and good cheer. 



WALTER DE GREY DIXON 




The First PROVO TRI3D WhRD 
MEETINGH0US3 



M EMORIES 



OF 



GRANDMA 



SARAH DE GREY DIXON 

Arthur D. Taylor recalls: "No better woman ever lived 
than Sarah DeGrey Dixon. Even though years have passed since she 
left us, I clearly remember how she looked and the many activities of 
her life in our neighborhood on "Sandy Alley" ( so called because of all 
the Dixon and Taylor redheads). She was medium in size, but big and 
tall in deeds. " 

Indeed, she was short - - a little under five feet in height. She 
was rosy-cheeked, healthy and energetic. Her good health proved to 
be a great blessing to Mary as well as to herself. Mary was frail and 
not always well. Sarah loved and cared for Mary and her children dur- 
ing these times with pure devotion and joy. 

Grandma had a firm testimony of the Gospel. She had many won- 
derful virtues, such as patience and understanding, compassion and 
tenderness, pride and courage, frugality and independence, faith and 
spirituality, a quick wit and a great love for all mankind. Her desires 
were those of her children, and she prayed always "to remain faithful 
and true to the end". This desire was fulfilled and on many occasions 
she was destined to become second mother to her children's families, 
to minister to the sick and those in need. Her main concern was to be 
where she was needed most. 

She was very religious and taught her children well by example as 
well as precept. She was President of the Third Ward Primary for 
many years and active as a teacher and visiting teacher in Relief Soc- 
iety. Many times she joined in singing duets for their programs. Her 
alto voice was very true and rich. According to the minutes of the 
Third Ward Relief Society, now residing in the Church Historian's 
Office and explored by Alice Taylor Nelson: "She bore her testimony 
nearly every meeting and always repeated her heart's desire:"She 
hoped her life would be spared to care for her children and that she 
would be faithful to the end. " In one of her testimonies she said she 
could not bear the trials if she were not prayerful. She believed this 
life was a threshing floor to fit and prepare us for exaltation. " 

Grandma's "boys" worked hard. Many hair-raising tales have we 
heard of the hazardous log-hauling trips down the canyons, of the bliz- 
zards, wild animals, etc. Their home never knew luxury, but it knew 
love and loyalty. No matter what serious problems or trials involved 
her family, she was right there to help her brood back to safety. At 
times she knew more sorrows, perhaps, than joys, having three of 
her wonderful sons precede her in death (Arthur, John and Walter). 

Among her sons were some skilled builders. Arthur, who was 
accidently electrocuted while in Heber, Utah, on a job, was a fine 
craftsman. He built Grandma's home at 270 North Fifth West, Provo 



121 



122 



MEMORIES OF GRANDMA 



Utah. Here it was that Grandma helped and "mothered" so many of 
her family. An identical home was built next to it for her daughter, 
Maria Louise Dixon Taylor ("Aunt Rye" to all of us) and her husband 
Arthur Nicholls Taylor. Aunt Rye's sons, Arthur and Elton, both re- 
fer to Grandma's taking care of them while Uncle "Art" served a mis- 
sion and Aunt Rye worked. Later, Aunt Rye went to England to meet 
her husband while Grandma stayed with the family. 

Grandma also helped my parents make a dream come true. When 
my father, LeRoy.was called on a mission to Great Britain, my mother 
(Electa Smoot Dixon) and my brother, Paul, lived in Grandma's house. 
Grandma took care of Paul while mother enrolled in a home nursing 
course. Upon completing the course, mother took "case work" while 
Grandma continued to care for Paul. Their combined efforts earned 
enough money to take them both to England to meet Daddy, just prior 
to his release. Aunt Allie Smoot Coleman took care of Paul for three 
months while they were gone. Mother was able to do some missionary 
work while there, and together she and Grandma were able to see won- 
derful sights. They visited Grandma's birthplace, Dudley, England. 
There Grandma walked about the old neighborhood and even found one 
old man who distinctly remembered the DeGrey family. Upon several 
occasions, when in doubt as to which direction to take, she would turn 
to mother and say, "Leek (my mother's nickname), there's no need to 
be lost as long as you've got a tongue in your head. " Another time, 
during a great celebration in London, they were almost crushed by the 
crowds. Grandma held her elbows out as far as she could possibly 
push and tightly clasped her hands across her chest. Mother was am- 
azed to see tiny Grandma literally lifted up and borne along by the 
crowd. Together with Daddy, they crossed the English Channel, visiting 
Paris before returning home. 

Grandma's whole life seemed centered in the success and welfare 
of her family. In 1922, Uncle Charles' beautiful wife, Virginia, died 
leaving six lovely children - - the youngest, an infant of two months. 
The oldest child, Valera, was just 12 years of age. I remember Grand- 
ma was living with us at the time this happened. She moved right into 
Uncle Charles' home. The baby came to our house for a while until 
things got organized and the baby was a bit older. 

Grandma later came back to live with us. Her days were spent in 
planning how she could best help her children; which one needed her 
most. Having made up her mind, she would say, "Leek, I think I shall 
go UP THE LINE today to help Arnold's May (Ernest also married a 
'May'). The next day she may be going DOWN THE LINE to help Rye 
or Louie. The 'line' was Fifth West Street in Provo, Utah, where 
most of her children lived. ) I can remember her sitting on our little 
"iron chair" (child's ice cream chair which just "fit" Grandma) : 



MEMORIES OF GRANDMA 



123 



folding clothes, churning butter, mending or darning clothes that still 
had some "wear in 'em," peeling fruit at canning time until her poor 
thumb would curl backwards (invariably she wore a protective bandage) 
or singing songs and rhymes to us. I can still see her sitting in a 
brightly lighted window with her strong magnifying glass, following the 
lines of her large print Book of Mormon. Having had a cataract opera 
tion earlier, her sight was never good, and she had to always wear 
very thick lensed glasses. I wondered, as a child, how she could ever 
even see through her thick glasses. Later, she would have us older 
children read to her from this huge book. It was always a special pri- 
vilege . 

Grandma always liked to be "of use" - - yet she was very proud. 
She loved to wash dishes, "pick up", and especially spend time in her 
room. My sister, Allie Dixon Gardner, reminds me that Grandma's 
little room at our house was HERS. She had privacy and quiet there 
whenever she desired. It was a wonderful room, though small. It 
held so many charms for us children. Grandma had her own high 
sideboard, the shelves of which contained precious pictures of her fam 
ily, handpainted dishes on stands, candy from her Christmas stocking 
which lasted as treats for us all through the summer. Her bed was al 
ways a great temptation to us, for it was puffed high with its feather 
mattress and down quilt. On great occasions she would allow us to 
open all doors through the narrow hall from her room into the kitchen 
and get a "running start" - - landing in the middle of all the puff. What 
fun it was to sink down - - down and do . And what a treat to sleep 
with Grandma once in a while. Then it was, we had the rare privilege 
of watching her put on her "petticoats": first the knit one, with the 
drawstring and crocheted around the bottom - - next the flannel one, 
also with drawstring - - then the linen one with lace edging, so clean 
and starched. Yes, it also had a drawstring. Finally her skirt, full 
or pleated, topped with a blouse - - or, on occasion, she may wear a 
dark dress. Then came her long, fresh white apron, reaching from 
her short waist to almost the bottom of her skirt. Her skirts ended 
just above the floor. They almost covered her small, high-top black 
shoes with low heels. The dresses she wore were made by my mother 
or given to her. Although she disliked fuss, she loved to have mother 
add a frill of lace or ruffle at the bottom of her long sleeves to cover 
the brown spots on her thin, work-worn hands. She often patted a bit 
of flour or cornstarch on the back of her hands to cover her veins. Her 
thin, fine dark hair was always neatly brushed on top of her head into 
a soft knot. In spite of the small combs to restrain them, a few" scold- 
ing locks" would find their way down onto her neck. She had very few 
streaks of gray in her hair even at the age of 81 years, when she passe 
away. Grandma had a fear of being buried alive. ( In those days, it 



124 



MEMORIES OF GRANDMA 



was sometimes heard of. ) She was so glad to know of "embalming" 
and definitely wanted to be embalmed even though she wanted to stay- 
in her own room until she was taken to her own funeral. (As a child, 
this thought always haunted me a little. ) 

Grandma had a widow's pension from the Black Hawk War. It was 
used for little things she wanted to give others. At Christmas she al- 
ways asked father to get her enough quarters to put in each sock for 
her grandchildren as a surprise. Yet, when she was given anything, 
she always protested. 

When her "boys" dropped in, as they often did, they would bend 
down and give her a kiss and a hug. She would always color a "Dixon 
blush" and say, "Ah, go along with you. " She was so pleased, but found 
it difficult to show it. How we children dearly loved to sit and hear her 
"boys" tell thrilling stories of their youth. Wildwood Resort, Provo 
Canyon, was the scene of many of these campfire story-telling treats. 

Grandma loved Wildwood and often spent days there enjoying her 
family and grandchildren. As my sister, Allie, said: "Grandma was 
wonderful with children. She took us on hikes up as far as Scott's 
cabin, and took us swimming in the river - - always taking along a 
bar of soap to wash our legs and arms." Clarence D. Taylor recalls: 
"My earliest remembrances of Wildwood connect with Grandma Dixon 
and Grandma Taylor. In our cabin, we only had one separate bedroom. 
This was the Grandmas' Room. Everyone else slept on sanitary couch- 
es in the main big living room. Two wicker rocking chairs occupied 
the front porch. Here the Grandmas could sit and rock, watch the 
people go up and down the camp, chat with those who had time to stop, 
and observe the children playing softball, tennis, volleyball and other 
sports. Grandma Dixon would take a dip in the river with the other 
bathers of the camp." 

"Just as the sun was sinking beyond the west hills, it was the sig- 
nal for all the children of the camp to gather round and go with the 
Grandmas on their evening walk. One evening the course would lead 
down to the main road, cross the creek and slowly follow the North Fork 
road up to the "Big Cliff" at the top of the camp. Here the Grandmas 
and the adults would sit down and rest, and the children would play 
around, climb the hills for service berries, hunt for precious rocks, 
or throw rocks in the creek. Grandma Dixon was always cautioning us 
to be careful so we would not get hurt. How pleased she was when the 
girls would gather a bouquet of wild flowers and present them to her. 
Soon we would cross the creek on the three poles which served as a 
bridge and proceed down the trail by the creek, past 'ground dog flat 1 
and on down the camp, visiting most of the cabins on the way. The 
next evening walk would take us down the main canyon road for about 
one-eighth of a mile to the Grandmas' Rock. At this big rock the adults 



PitOVQ THIRD UiiHD CHAPEL 




PHuVu THIHD N&KD GYMNASIUM 



and CiiiPKL 



MEMORIES OF GRANDMA 



125 



would rest while the children played around. Then all would return 
back past the cow pasture, the frog ponds, the big dead cottonwood tree 
with the blue jays and back to the cabin, arriving just at dusk. Another 
favorite walk was down the railroad tracks for about one -eighth of a 
mile to the 'Bear's Head'. This was a cliff overhanging the railroad 
tracks and which resembled a bear's head. If you looked real close, 
you could see an eye, the mouth wide open with a tinge of red for the 
tongue and even an ear. Everyone kept a little closer together in 
going along the tracks, for fear of stepping on a rattlesnake , or having 
a skunk run out of the willows and weeds - -spraying you. For the older 
kids, a trip to "Vivian Park was a treat; especially when the Grandmas 
would let us work at some odd and unnecessary job in order to earn a 
dime or quarter to spend at the store there." 

In the cold mornings in Wildwood, how good Grandma's "crust 
coffee" tasted. It was made from the burned crusts of bread with boil- 
ing water poured over it, served with sugar and cream. Also the Mor- 
mon Tea made with hot water, sugar and cream. Alice Taylor Nelson 
remembers one morning in the canyon when Grandma Dixon was mak- 
ing bread. She noticed a pan with bits of oatmeal stuck to it, soaking 
with hot water on the coal stove. Realizing this warm water was just 
what she needed for the bread, Grandma poured cereal bits and all in- 
to the "makings" of the dough. Alice was horrified and questioned her. 
In reply, Grandma gave her a " straight- from-the- shoulder" lecture 
on Waste not, want not. " (to Grandma, the bits of cereal and clean 
water were "food".) Clarence Taylor mentioned that Grandma would 
caution the children to take only the amount of food they were sure they 
could eat. "Make sure your eyes are not bigger than your belly. " She 
would say. After eating, she would gather all the dishes and scrape 
them thoroughly clean. Anything she could save and use she would 
store away for another meal. Everything else she would put aside for 
someone's dog, pig or cow. 

In the canyon, Grandma was always up first. She'd pour "creek 
water" into the washbowl and wash thoroughly, winding up with splash- 
ing cold water on her chest. Then she'd lovingly prepare warm wash 
water for Grandma Taylor, who really objected to the other Grandma's 
fussing over her so- - but "our" Grandma seemed to love it. 

Grandma Dixon was fairness itself. "She never complained and 
was always ready to help anyone in need. Her loyalty and compassion 
were great. Before blaming others for errors, she examined herself 
to see if she could have helped them to avoid-wrong- doing. She was 
willing to share the blame. " So recalls Allie Dixon Gardner. 

Grandma meant many things to many people. She was noble, won- 
derful and a courageous person who dearly loved her posterity. The 
love was returned in full measure. Lessons learned from Grandma 



126 



MEMORIES OF GRANDMA 



were not forgotten. Many of her older grandchildren have living me- 
morie s of her . 

ARTHUR DIXON TAYLOR Comments: In 1903 when my brother, 
Elton was a baby, my mother went to England to meet father who was on 
a mission. Grandmother Dixon took over and was our mother and took 
care of Elton, Lynn and me. We lived with her for six months, and 
though I was only eight years old, I learned to love her very much and 
found out what a lovely, kind woman she was. Her home, that her boys 
built for her was just across the lane from our home, so through most 
of my growing up years I was near her and had her influences and guid- 
ance and love . 

She used to go to Salt Lake City to attend General Conference every 
six months. She stayed at her sisters' place, Aunt Selina Hall and Aunt 
Charlotte Baddley. She took me with her on one of these occasions, the 
first time I had ever been on a train and the first time I ever went to 
Salt Lake. I remember so well that when we got off the train, there 
was a fruit stand nearby, and for the first time, I saw a banana. Grand- 
mother stayed at Aunt Selina's place this time, and I remember how 
strange everything seemed and I became homesick. Grandma said 
that I came to her and said, "Grandma, the Lord will take care of us, 
won't he?" And, of course, she agreed with me and comforted me. 
She took me to Conference in the Tabernacle and we sat on the front 
bench. Aunt Selina had prepared a lunch for us to take along, and when 
the morning session was over, we did not leave our seats; but opened 
our lunch and ate it right there on that front bench and then she had me 
stretch out on the bench and go to sleep until the afternoon session st- 
arted. We never left the Tabernacle from the time we arrived early in 
the morning until late in the afternoon when the session was over. I 
always admired Grandmother's faithfulness and loyalty to the Church. 
She had a firm testimony of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. I remember 
that she always bore her testimony in our Fast Meetings and she would 
always conclude her testimony with these words: "I hope and pray that 
the Lord will help me to be faithful to the end. " She was so staunch and 
true, in my sight, that I could never see, as a boy, why she should 
make such a statement. Her desire was certainly fulfilled, for she was 
faithful and true to her testimony of the truthfulness of the Gospel up to 
the day she died. 

I remember that she was of a very serious nature and had an abun- 
dance of courage and patience. That was made manifest when Aunt 
Virginia, Uncle Charles' wife, died leaving a family of little children 
for Uncle'Charl" to raise. Grandma took over. She was old (79 years) 
and her nerves were not like they were when she was young and rearing 
her own children. The baby, Virginia, was just born and all the rest 
were very young. Grandma practically reared them until they 




The Old and the New 
PHOVO IfcBEEl&CLES 



MEMORIES OF GRANDMA 



127 



could take care of themselves. 

We must not overlook her fine qualities in living the life of plural 
marriage. Jealousy and partialities did often strain women's feelings 
to the limit under those conditons. Often bitter feelings in some fam- 
ilies were never lived down. Grandma Dixon showed her strong char- 
acter in her ability to get along with others through her life and espec- 
ially with Aunt Mary and her family. She loved Aunt Mary as if she 
were her own sister and they, and their children, worked together to 
survive after Grandpa Dixon died. I often think that the struggle and 
fight that both families had to make for existence in those early days 
is what has made the Dixons united and love one another. 

Grandma had lived through the Pioneer days. She crossed the 
Plains in a wagon train and she walked all of the way. Her Mother was 
a widow and took in washing for a living - - - Grandma knew what 
hardships meant and how valuable and scarce food was in those pion- 
eer days. I remember an incident that happened one day when Grand- 
ma came over to our house for dinner. She insisted on helping mother 
get dinner ready. Mother was peeling the potatoes and Grandmother 
watched her for a few minutes and then came over to the sink and 
scolded her for being so wasteful. Mother wa s peeling potatoes as any 
housewife would do at that time. Grandma felt that she should just 
scrape the skin off and not cut so deep into the potato. Grandma lived 
through a period when even the skins of potatoes would have been wel- 
comed and she felt that mother was a bit wasteful. 

Grandma was loved by the women in the Provo Third Ward and 
was constantly sought after in times of sickness, death and troubles 
that came into their homes. She had lived through plenty of troubles 
in her own life and knew what it meant to lend a helping hand to others. 
She was a leader in the Church. She was President of the Third Ward 
Primary for many years and had many responsibilities in the Re- 
lief Society. 

She and Granmother, Eliza N. Taylor, were great friends all 
the days of their lives. I think probably the most interesting sight I 
had, just prior to the end of their days, was seeing them sitting to- 
gether, in two large wicker rockers on the front porch of ourWildwood 
cabin, in perfect peace and comfort - - talking over the old times. 

We can be very thankful and proud of our heritage and birthright 
passed on to us by such a wonderful individual as Grandma Sarah De- 
Grey Dixon. 

ELTON LEROY TAYLOR Comments: Grandma Dixon was a very 
special person in my life and was a very practical and wholesome in- 
fluence in it. I was born in June, 1900, and father (Arthur Nicholls 
Taylor) left for his mission to England the same fall, leaving mother 
(Maria Dixon Taylor) and my older brothers: Arthur, Lynn and my- 



128 



MEMORIES OF GRANDMA 



self, as the baby, at home on Fifth West in Provo, Utah. Mother 
went back to work at Shelton's Book Store (her employer before her 
marriage). She rented the home they were just completing (adjoining 
Grandma's house on the south) and we moved in with Grandma Dixon 
until father's return. I became Grandma's special charge and "trial", 
mother being gone through the day. This seemed to be Grandma Dixon's 
fate and mission in life, besides rearing her own family as a young 
widow of limited means, to take over the "bringing up" of her "problem" 
grandsons and granddaughters as well as the "better behaved ones" - - 
teaching us the way in which we should go. We ever owe her a debt of 
gratitude for the things she did in our behalf. 

She was loving and kind, but firm in seeing that things were done 
right. Her deep spiritual influence and humble, never -questioning de- 
votion to Gospel teachings still remains with us. Her love of children 
and loyal devotion to her family was something to behold. Even as 
larger boys and girls we loved to sit on her lap as she sat in her low, 
armless rocking chair, while she sang to us (she had a sweet alto 
voice) as she rocked - - -and then would tell us pioneer stories. She 
would sing "sea chanteys" which sailors had taught her during the long 
trip by sailing vessel from England to America - - - songs they sung 
while raising and lowering the sails. One of Grandma's songs she 
sang while teaching us to count was: 

"one, two, three, four, five, I caught a fish alive. Why did you 
let him go? Because he bit my finger so." All the while she was 
counting our fingers and toes. We learned to count to five FAST. 

I think one of Sarah DeGrey Dixon's outstanding traits was patience. 
She was the exemplification of it. She was industrious - always busy. 
Pioneer life had taught her to be frugal. This was evident in many of 
the sayings she lived by: "Waste not, want not" - "We better prepare 
for a hard winter" "The squirrels are gathering seeds and nuts early." 
"A green Christmas, a fat graveyard. " One of her rules for mating. 
"Marry opposite s. A light-haired person should marry a dark-haired 
person. " (She approved of Ethel because she felt her dark hair went 
well with my red hair. ) 

She was of a cheerful disposition, had a sense of humor - - tho' 
typically English, being often belated. Father delighted in telling her 
"mother-in-law stories". At times she hardly knew how to take him, 
never knowing when he was serious or having fun with her. With all 
the red hair in our family, someone remarked about Henry Dixon 
Taylor's wavy black hair. A member of the family explained: "Oh, 
that's the African blood finally showing up in the family. " Grandma 
defensively came back, "I'll have you understand there is no Kaffir 
blood in our family. " 

Grandma loved her "Dixie" relatives, as all of us enjoyed their 



MEMORIES OF GRANDMA 



129 



visits to Provo. Her home was always their headquarters here. She 
had three married sisters living in Rockville, Grafton area of South- 
ern Utah. Many of the people today in Hurricane, Utah area, are de- 
scendants of Maria Brooks DeGrey. Grandma loved to go to visit 
them although the trip down "The BlackRidge" above Toque rville was 
always a terrifying experience for her. You can readily appreciate 
this when today you travel a beautiful six-lane highway on the oppos- 
ite side of the canyonand look across and seethe steep, narrow, wind- 
ing road which the early settlers there had to travel. Their early 
farms were on a narrow strip of land on either side of the Virgin 
R ive r and every spring they would be flooded or cut away. Grandma 
said the folks there said it was named the Virgin, but should have been 
called "The Dirty Devil." 

The last time we saw Grandma alive, was in Uncle Roy's home 
on Fifth West. She was bedfast when Ethel and I went to visit her on 
our return from our honeymoon in California. She wanted to know all 
about Aunt Hattie and Uncle George West, whom we had visited in San 
Bernardino. We had to tell her about the little two- roomed "Pot Rock" 
house we had moved into in Pleasant Grove. How the folks had been 
over and strewn rice through the house, taken the slats out of the bed, 
tied the sheets in knots and had even hung old shoes on the front gate. 
The shoe business seemed to strike her as very funny, as she burst 
out laughing and seemed so much like her old self again. This, I 
think, was the last time she laughed, as she passed away a short time 
later. 

ERMA DIXON BOSHARD Comments: Grandma had a large pict- 
ure of the Pioneer Route crossing the Plains hanging on her wall. I 
loved that picture and the stories she told us. That same picture is 
now handing in the Daughters of the Utah Pioneer Museum in Provo. 

Their first home had one large room in the center with Grandma 
Sarah's bedroom on the west side and Aunt Mary's bedroom on the 
east side. At the rear was the eating kitchen and an outdoor summer 
porch,which Grandmaused as a summer kitchen. In the hot summers, 
she would cook outside to keep the house cool. Grandpa planted two 
elm trees in front - - they are still there. He also planted a silver 
maple, some lilacs and mulberry trees. The mulberry trees were 
used as food for silkworms. The two families lived together in this 
home for a short time until Grandpa built another adobe house on the 
same lot for Aunt Mary. Grandma made all the boys' suits during 
their growing years. They were well- fitting and beautifully made. 
Grandma was always industrious and very frugal. Frugality was a 
dominant part of her life. 

One winter we stayed with Grandma Dixon while Dad was working 
in Salt Lake City. I remember when Grandma went to Salt Lake to 



130 



MEMORIES OF GRANDMA 



have Dr. Stauffer remove her cataracts from her eyes. We all gath- 
ered at Aunt Rye's house, where we all prayed and fasted for her. 

Grandma observed the Word of Wisdom always. It hurt her when 
others didn't. I can still taste the delicious "crust coffee" she used to 
make with burned bread and hot water poured over it. Also Mormon 
Tea; hot water, sugar andcr earn. My Dad said Grandma was the best 
cook in all the world. 

I loved her so much. You could always depend on her in times of 
need - - it didn't matter what the weather, she would go where she 
thought she was needed most. I do love and appreciate my relatives 
and am proud of our heritage. 

LEAH DIXON FORD Comments: Grandmother was a very marve- 
lous person, I do know. And the older I get, the more I appreciate 
her. I remember we used to ask Grandma: Please sing "Can She Bake 
a Cherry Pie, Billy Boy, Billy Boy? " etc. That was my favorite. She 
would sing it over and over. 

Grandmother came to our house a lot when the twins, Ronald and 
Ralph, were small to help mother. Ronald was not well and such a 
care. She would walk about four blocks in the deep snow. Mother 
would say, "it's too far for you to walk, and too slick, Grandma. "She 
would answer, "I am careful not to fall, and I need the exercise and 
you need my help, so I will come." Father said, "If you would only 
stay overnight, Mother." But she would only reply, "I need to walk, 
it makes me feel better, and I'm used to the heated house at Roy' s - 
and I need my own bed at night. " I am sure she was happiest there 
"Electa understands me just as if she were my own daughter," she'd 
say. I remember Aunt Electa was so sweet and tactful. If Grandma 
would suggest something, she would say, "Yes, I think you are right, 
Grandma. " 

Grandma would make her roly-poly pudding with fruit in it and 
served with cream over it. It was delicious. I still long for some. 
When I make it.it doesn't taste the same. 

Grandma went to the Temple with our family. She was so happy 
about it. Mother, Dad and the small children went home afterwards. 
But Grandma, Erma and I stayed overnight at Aunt Sarah McConachie 's" 
We slept with Grandma. It was such fun. 

MAUD DIXON MARKHAM Recollections: When I was a little girl, 
we loved to hear Grandma tell of crossing the Plains. "I walked all 
the way, " she would say - not proudly, but with a good deal of satis- 
faction. She even refused rides , not to break her record, I think. "But 
Grandma, "we'd say, "the cold, the heat, lack of water, fear of Indians? " 
She'd answer, " I enjoyed crossing the Plains." 

While she was living on the corner of 3rd West and 2nd North, 
which was just a block from the big, deep- running Mill Race, her 



MEMORIES OF GRANDMA 



131 



children would often sneak away and play on its dangerous banks . . . 
no matter how she threatened them. This had to stop. So she and a 
friend, called "old Lady Radybow" put their heads together and came 
up with the answer. The next time the boys went to the Mill Race, 
they heard an eerie, wailing sound under the bridge . . then a terrible 
witdibegan to emerge in the dusk, shaking a stick and screetching at 
them "to never come there again." They ran home, white as sheets, 
to tell their mother, who knew all the time it was the dramatic per- 
formance of her friend. It was very effective. 

When my father, John DeGrey Dixon was 17 years old, Grandpa 
Dixon died while still a young man. That first year all Grandma had 
to burn in her stove was green wood., but she never complained about 
this or rearing her large family alone - - or the sad loss of her dear 
Henry. 

Grandma Dixon was a good cook and made excellent pies. Grand- 
pa Dixon loved pie which contained lard in the crust. Now he was ex- 
tremely opposed to eating pork and always refused it. But he never 
passed up pie. Once Grandma, a little exasperated said, "Henry, you 
just as well eat the Devil's meat, as drink his brothe. 11 

It was General Conference and John was riding into Salt Lake City, 
a trip taking about three days in those times. Grandma, who couldn't 
go, waited for him to return to tell her who the new apostle was. As 
he entered, she said, "Well, John, who is the new apostle?" He told 
her. "Well", she said, "it's a good thing the Lord thought of him, for 
I never should have. " 

I first remember Grandma when she came to Salt Lake to stay 
with us while having cataracts removed from her eyes. She was al- 
ways patient. In fact, I think PATIENCE was her dominant quality. 

Years later we moved to Provo and lived in the north part of Grand- 
ma's house while our present house was being built. Aunt Electa and 
Uncle Roy lived in the south half. Grandma was staying with Aunt Rye 
or other children who needed her at the time. The Dixon brothers 
used to congregate at our place evenings. "Horses" was their main 
topic of conversation. "Charl" and "Em" would often get into heated 
arguments as to who had the best pacer or what little "filly" could run 
the fastest. About midnight Grandma would get disgusted and sweep 
them all out of the place. 

Grandma was very saving, but gave it all away to children who 
needed itjsaving one son's home and helping others in financial stress. 

LUCILE KNOWLDEN DIXON Comments: (Wife of Aldous Dixon, 
who lived next door to Grandma). Little Grandma was getting quite old 
and was not very well when I lived by her on Fifth West. Mostly we 
had very little to say to each other beyond the usual greetings and 
pleasantries. 



132 



MEMORIES OF GRANDMA 



Most of all, I was impressed by her thriftiness. Memories of 
want and privation in her early years and the hard experiences cross- 
ing the Plains seemed to crowd in on her as she became old and weary. 
She was saving beyond being reasonable , not enjoying the presents 
given to her. Aldous 1 mother often bought her a pretty white blouse or 
some other "dress-up" piece of clothing. She always said, "Thank you". 
And then, "But Sarah, I shall never live to wear it out." This went 
on for years. Aunt Sarah told her to get all the good out of the gift, 
and that she would see to it that some deserving person got it later. 

Toward the end of her life she didn't want Aunt Leek's girls to 
change jelly or jam to a clean dish because some might be wasted in 
the exchange. She was not stingy - - just wanted to make use of every- 
thing. 

Our children always called her "Little Grandma Dixon" to distin- 
guish her from their own Grandma Dixon (Sarah Lewis Dixon, John's 
wife). Aldous used to tell a story that he said his father told him: 
When Grandma Dixon and her sister, Charlotte, were small and cross- 
ing the Plains, they had one ox that was a good puller and one ox that 
was not. When they came to a steep hill or water to be crossed and 
the one ox balked, Grandma would say, "Come on Charlotte, let's 
pray. " They would go out to the side of the road and kneel down. Then 
they would say, "O Lord, bless all the oxen that WILL pull and all the 
oxen that WON'T pull. Amen. " 

RHEA DIXON REEVE recollections. When I think of Grandma 
Dixon, I picture a small, modest, independent, humble woman. I 
think of her as being seen and not heard. I see a small, frail, active 
12 year old, foot- weary, but uncomplaining as she trekked across the 
hot, dusty trail of the Plains. This determination that helped her walk 
those long miles and not falter, I observed all through her life while I 
knew her. Grandma Dixon had little to say, but she was a "doer", 
and what she did was practical, helpful and without remuneration. 
Money was not Grandma's goal. The simple, everyday things were 
her way of life. I can remember when she ate dinner with us one Sun- 
day. She said, "Louie, you're a good woman and a fine cook, but you 
could leave the frosting off the cake and it would be better for Walter 
and all concerned." Mother loved and understood Grandma, so she 
wasn't offended. Grandma was frank and plain spoken. She was kind 
and her intentions were meant to help and not to insult. 

She had so many sad experiences and times were so hard in her 
girlhood and all of her marriedlife that she never ceased being frugal, 
thrifty and self-sacrificing. I recall Erma and I picking strawberries 
in the hot sun to earn a little money. With some of our meager earn- 
ings we bought Grandma a nice black purse. (The one she had was so 
very shabby. ) We wrapped it nicely and bought a card and wrote our 



MEMORIES OF GRANDMA 



133 



love for our Grandma Dixon. We took it to her home which at that 
time was Uncle LeRoy's place. Well, we were all smiles as we enter- 
ed the door and called, "Happy Birthday, Grandma!" As we glanced 
at her face, our smiles changed to frown as Grandma said, "Gracious 
me, girls, I don't need a present. There isn't anything you could buy 
that I could use. " We insisted on her opening the gift and thought when 
she saw it she would change her mind. But no, she said, "That's a 
very nice purse, but I like the one I have and it will do for me, the 
little shopping I need to do these days." She wouldn't accept it and 
thanked us and told us to get our money back and buy something for us. 
We were sad all the way home and my father, in his kind way, tried to 
reassure us that this was Grandma's "way" , but deep down in her heart 
she was happy because we loved her enough to get something for her. 

Frills, silks and satins were not a part of Grandma's wardrobe. 
She wore plain, practical, dark clothing that wouldn't show soil and 
would wear well. "Durable" was an important word to Grandma. Her 
character proved to be"durable", too. I can think of her hands wrink- 
led and rough from years of dedicated service to family, neighbors 
and friends. Work was her goal. She had learned the satisfaction of 
work well done as a child. As she grew, her desire to help and give 
service grew also. I heard her tell my mother, after the death of my 
beloved father, that she was glad my mother enjoyed housekeeping and 
working hard, as that would help her through the sad days to come, 
and comfort and sustain her. The poet tells us that into each life 
some rain must fall. Cloudbursts came into Grandma's unselfish way 
of life, in spite of her goodness and faithfulness to her God. He tested 
her and found that her heart and shoulders were equal to the challenge 
she must meet. All her days when things went wrong, she did not ask 
to be freed from sorrow and hardships, but plead for strength and cou- 
rage to conquer adversity. I can't recall her complaining. 

One day Erma and I were visiting with Grandma. We asked her 
about polygamy and said we didn't think it was fair for Grandpa to 
marry a young, pretty girl when she was old and had so much work to 
do that she couldn't spend time or money to dress up. We made some 
silly comments about what we would do to get rid of the other wife. 
Grandma didn't get upset, but looked sternly at us and said, "It is wise 
to keep still when you don't know what you're talking about. Anyway, 
the Church has changed this law and you won't have to live it, which is 
a good thing, as you aren't unselfish and big enough to live in that way. " 
She added that she loved Aunt Mary and her children and treated them 
as her own. I know this is true and that good feeling of togetherness 
is a part of our present day heritage. 

Grandma was meek and unassuming. She didn't want compliments 
or pay for the service she gave. She felt that the Landlord of Life had 



134 



MEMORIES OF GRANDMA 



given her more than she could ever repay by just giving her the privi- 
lege of living. To her, "living was working and giving. " I think Grand- 
ma, if she had been asked about her blessings or what she was thankful 
for, would have said, "I cherish the treasures I have been given here 
upon this lovely earth. I appreciate my many blessings and thank God 
for my birth. " 

Grandma's wealth consisted of the love she received from a good, 
upright, devoted husband who lived the good life well. Her cup over- 
flowed with the joy that each of her sons and daughter brought her. 
After Grandpa passed away, through her wisdom, ability to work, faith 
and courage, they had a happy home and were not deprived of the nec- 
essities of life. Grandma, by example and precept, taught apprecia- 
tion to her family. I can remember my father telling how thrilled they 
were with a few pieces of molasses candy on Christmas Day; how proud 
he was of his "home-made" clean clothing. Grandma didn't try to"keep 
up with the Joneses." She didn't covet her neighbor's good fortune, 
but was content. 

I can remember her helping mother bottle fruit for our boarders 
when it came noon, she took off her apron and said, 11 I shall eat with 
Rye or Charles" (who lived nearby). "They can afford to feed me more 
than you can. " This would make my mother sad, as the little food 
Grandma ate didn't amount to much. After lunch she would be on hand 
to finish the fruit. I can't remember when Grandma just "dropped in" 
to visit. She would come when she knew there was something extra to 
be done. Idleness was not a fault of my Grandmother's. 

I referred to her "worn-out pocketbook " I doubt if its contents 
were ever more than $5 at a time, but she carried it with her and used 
it wisely. She was honest to a fault with paying her share to the Church 
or whatever donation that was called for her to contribute. I can re- 
call coming home from school one day and asking my generous mother 
for some money to get something that my friend had. Mother didn't 
have the change. Grandma felt it was a worthy cause and without any 
one's knowing about it, she gave me the money and said, " This is my 
secret. " I said I'd pay it back, and she answered, "You help your 
mother and that will be the debt paid. " 

One day Erma ate dinner with us. Grandma happened to come in. 
She said, "Mercy me, Louie has enough mouths to feed without your 
eating here. Your father can afford to feed you and Louie cannot." 
Erma cried and ran home. I was provoked at Grandma, but realized 
how concerned she was about helping my mother. Grandma had been 
so poor in worldly good most of her life that she could realize how 
other poor people felt and didn't just sympathize, but managed with 
her limited store to share with them. Her consideration of others won 
her many devoted friends. Grandma was sincere. She didn't pretend 
or exaggerate. She didn't approve of the hypocrite, and her word was 



MEMORIES OF GRANDMA 



135 



her bond. She was a most spiritual person. She communicated and 
kept in tune with her Heavenly Father. She was a faithful servant and 
attending Church was the highlight of her week. I loved my grandmoth- 
er. I am happy for my memories of my association with her and I am 
pleased to relate them to the Dixon youth to cherish and appreciate. " 

VESTA DIXON BOOTH Comments: "I remember Grandma Dixon 
was always the first to come and help if anyone was ill. I remember 
her telling my mother, "Hattie, you are like I am; we have that rosy- 
cheeked English complexion and no one ever thinks we are sick, be- 
cause our skin isn't pale. We can be as sick as anyone, even if we 
look the picture of health. " 

NANCY McCONACHIE ARMSTRONG recalls how Grandma loved 
to do Temple Work. She stayed at Aunt Sarah McConachie 's , some- 
times for ten days at a time. Nearly every day she'd spend a full day 
at the Temple. She'd take her lunch and Nancy would go from school 
to the Temple Grounds to go home with Grandma. She came prepared 
to have a long wait, for Grandma was never quite through. Although 
they had money to take the streetcar home, Grandma insisted on walk- 
ing up steep Main Street Hill, home, and use the money for the Temple. 

Some of the sayings remembered by VIVIAN HASTINGS KERR, 
who lived at the Lie Roy Dixon home the same time as Grandma Dixon: 
"Comb that child's hair; she looks like a broom in a fit. " "That girl 
can throw more out the back door with a spoon than her husband can 
bring in the front door with a scoop shovel. " At times when Electa 
was nursing her babies, yet being busy, would "hand them over" to 
others to tend, Grandma would say, "Leek, you are teaching that child 
to have nothing but cupboard love for you. "She would often say, "Leek, 
you and Vivian go along with your work, I'll churn; you don't have to 
think to do that. " Early every morning you could see her going up or 
down Fifth West to some home of her family to give of her unselfish 
devotion wherever she thought she could do the most good. 

Sarah DeGrey Dixon, a woman small in stature, but "tall in deeds", 
died in "her room" on April 17, 1926, in Provo, Utah, at the age of 
eighty-one years. For several days prior to her death, I remember 
the family gathering around her bedside. "Her body is really worn out", 
they would say, "but her valiant heart just won't give up". WHAT A 
PIONEER she was - - what a courageous spirit - - an example of all 
that is "eternally" good. Surely her heart's desire to "remain faithful 
to the end" was granted. She was buried in Provo City Cemetery on 
April 19, 1926. 

Compiled by 
Sarah Vera Dixon Summerhays 
June 1969 



A PATRIARCHAL BLESSING 
of 

SARAH DE GREY DIXON 



Provo, Utah 
Nov. 17, 1900 

A blessing pronounced by Patriarch Charles D. Evans upon the 
head of Sarah DeGrey Dixon, daughter of John DeGrey and Maria 
Brooks, born in Worcestershire, England, January 27, 1845. 

Sister Sarah by virtue of my office I lay my hands upon thy head, 
and pronounce and seal upon thee a blessing, for thou art of the royal 
seed of Ephraim and heiress of eternal covenants. Thou hast been 
tried and weighed in the balances, and art not found wanting. Thou 
art a great mother in Israel. Thy soul is honest and thy love of child- 
ren boundless. Thou wilt have power to train them in the ways of the 
Lord. They will cling unto thee and never forsake thee. Thy feet are 
established in the path which leads to thy glory and thou shalt not fall 
under trial, but be like the great oak to resist the storms. Thy hum- 
ility is recorded by the angels, for pride hath not lifted thee up. High- 
ly favored art thou of the Lord, like Elizabeth and Mary of old. Great 
shall be thy blessings and thou shalt be lifted up above many. The Lord 
loveth thee for thy righteousness. He will make thee great and thy 
royal generations shall never cease out of the earth, nor thy name be 
taken from the book of life. Prudence and wisdom will abide in thee 
as a fountain, and thou shalt direct thy steps aright, and be strong in 
the Lord. Israel upon thee the blessing of inheritance with thy husband, 
and with thy generations forever. The words of thy lips shall comfort 
the sorrowful and bind thy children unto the Lord. Intelligence shall 
beam from thy eyes as the light of precious gems before a flame. Thy 
throne is prepared before the foundations of the earth; thou shalt stand 
with the great mothers, and overcome by faith. Thy food and raiment 
shall not fail, but thou shalt be a queen forever and I seal thee up to 
come forth in the morning of the first resurrection in the name of 
Jesus Christ, Amen. 

Blessing # 2157. Recorded in Book C, Page 394 by CHARLES D. 
EVANS, Patriarch. 



1-36 



MiiRY SMITH DIXON 
1852 - 1907 




Biography of MARY SMITH DIXON 
By Alice Dixon Dangerfield 

Mary Anne Smith Dixon, the daughter of Robert and Mary Brown 
Smith, was born at Hull, England, on October 3, 1852. She and her 
brothers, William and Robert, were the only three children that their 
parents were permitted to raise; the others having died in infancy. 

When Mary was but six years old her mother died. The father 
and two children felt deeply the grief caused by the passing of the one 
member of the home whose place is seldom, if ever, filled. Loved 
ones came to their assistance, and for awhile they were cared for by 
a cousin. Later, the grandmother, who is surely the next to mother, 
gave her services and they were given the best of care. Mary could 
never forget the few short years she spent with her grandmother. In 
later years she never tired of telling her own children of the days 
thus spent. She told them how she and her dear old grandmother sat 
together in the evening, listening to the chimes of the Church bells, 
while Grandmother told stories of her own childhood days. 

At the age of thirteen, another deep sorrow came to the home. 
This time the father was taken and the children were deprived of all 
support. It now became necessary for Mary to work. Soon after 
the father's death she secured a position as nurse -maid, and continued 
to work as such until her health failed and she was forced to give it up. 
Her brother who was older than she, had found work at Hull and was 
boarding with friends. When Mary was no longer able to work, he 
took her to see these people. They thought that if she would take a 
rest in the Country that she might regain her health. She was taken 
by these friends to the home of William Leake and remained there 
during the rest of her life in England. 

Being very proficient with the needle she was of much service to 
the family, and since she had a sunny disposition, she added to the hap- 
piness of the home. These people were members of the Mormon 
Church, and Mary went with them to the Church service. She became 
a convert and later was baptized a member. Most of the converts were 
anxious to reach Utah. The Leake family was no exception. They did 
not have enough money to migrate to Utah but were saving with that 
end in view. 

Mary's health did not improve but had grown steadily worse. The 
doctor had told her that her only chance was a change of climate, as 
she was suffering from tuberculosis . The Leake family was anxious 
to take her with them on their journey to America. Being without 
money, Mary said she could not think of going. She was only persuad- 
ed when assured that she would enjoy better health in Utah, and could 
then earn money to pay them back. While being administered to, in 
behalf of her health, she was promised by one of the missionaries that 
she should make the journey in safety and that upon reaching Utah, 



137 



138 



MARY SMITH DIXON 



She would be in perfect health. Her brother was willing for her to go 
since he had also become a convert to the Mormon Faith. However, 
her grandmother and other relatives were very much opposed to her 
going. They had no faith in what she had been promised and, knowing 
her physical condition, could see nothing but death and a watery grave. 
Mary was but a child in years, being only sixteen, but she eagerly ac- 
cepted the kind offer of her friends and took the only chance which was 
open to her for a return to health. 

When she arrived in Liverpool, she was so weak that she had to 
be assisted in boarding the ship. Brave people were Father and Mother 
Leake, to take this almost invalid child under their protecting care and 
attempt a perilous journey. Their courage was something more than 
human. They left Liverpool on June 5, 1868. The journey was made 
in a sailing vessel called "The Constitution", and required six weeks 
and two days. After landing, they traveled as far as Laramie, Wyom- 
ing by rail and the remainder of the way by ox team in Captain Gil- 
lispie's Company. It required about six weeks to make the journey. 
The wagons were quite well filled with provisions and baggage so that 
many of the emigrants were required to walk. 

The trip across the ocean was a wonderful help to Mary. Her 
health began to return. It was so much improved that she was able to 
walk almost the entire distance from Laramie to Salt Lake - -a very 
wonderful experience for this girl of sixteen years. We can only im- 
agine her delight in being able to report to her loved ones in England 
that upon arriving in Utah she was in perfect health, and had gained 
thirty- five pounds in weight. The disease which she had been suffer- 
ing never troubled her during the remainder of her life. 

They arrived in Salt Lake City in September 1868. The members 
of the Leake family were without funds and had no particular place to 
go. They were fortunate, however, in meeting a returned missionary 
from their native land and they spent the first night under his roof. 
The tithing clerk, whose duty it was to secure places for the emigrants, 
found homes for the children to work in, as Father Leake was not able 
at first to keep them all at home. Mary Smith went to work for John 
W. Young, who was then living in the house that is now located at 
Liberty Park. Many will recall having seen this historic building. 

The tithing clerk, who was none other than Henry Aldous Dixon, 
was much pleased with the appearance of Mary. He admired her smil- 
ing black eyes and womanly ways, although she was but sixteen years 
of age. For months he kept watch of her, and finally succeeded in 
claiming her as his second bride. 

Although only seventeen, she was married on April 13, 1869. Her 
marriage proved to be the crowning event of her life. She not only re- 
ceived a worthy, ambitious and affectionate husband, but she found in 




PROVO THIRD WARD MEETING 
HOUSES 

The Old and the New 

mm 




PROVO THIRD WKBD MEETING HOUSE 



GEO. a. SMITH ROW 



Roberts Home in background 



♦ f THE ROUND HOUSE » 

SOUTHWORTH'S STORE 
Corner 5th West and 
First North 




MARY SMITH DIXON 



139 



his first wife a wonderful sister, the like of whom she never had known. 
They lived in the same house and exchanged with each other their joys 
and their sorrows. 

Together they lived, together they worked for the man who shared 
alike his love and support with both women. Mary lived in Salt Lake 
about two years and then the family moved to Provo. The remainder 
of her life, except one year, was spent in that town. She was the 
mother of seven children - four boys and three girls , all, except the first 
were born in Provo. She was privileged to raise all of her children but 
one, who died in infancy. The Children: Alice Dixon Dangerfield, Sarah 
Dixon Mc Conachie , William Aldous , Albert Frederick, Parley Smith, 
and Hattie Dixon West. 

Mary and Sarah lived together in the same house while the family 
was small, but as it increased in size it became necessary to occupy 
separate homes. The children grew up to honor, love and respect 
each woman as a mother. During the first few years in Provo, Mary's 
time was given almost entirely to the care of the family, which was 
then young. Few mothers have given more hours of service in caring 
for her sick children than she did. Many nights she watched and pray- 
ed over her second child, who for years required her constant care. 
Sister Sarah took her turn also in nursing this child back to health. 
In fact, Sarah was always ready to assist during the days of sickness 
and worry. 

On May 4, 1884, death robbed these two faithful women of their 
beloved husband. One can only imagine the grief caused by his pass- 
ing, but in knowing the children who were left to grow to manhood and 
womanhood, one cannot help but know the courage and the fortitude 
these two women possessed in rearing their family. 

During her later life, Mary Dixon gave much of her time to the 
public. She was a teacher in the Relief Society for years, and she 
worked in the Primary Association for a long period. She was a lover 
of children, and her patience in their behalf was wonderful . 

Being very skilled in sewing, she rendered invaluable service to 
the community in which she lived. Most of the people who departed 
from this life, while she lived in the community, were laid away in 
clothing which she had made or had helped to make. 

Mary Anne Smith Dixon passed away at her home in the Provo 
Third Ward on June 27, 1907. 



History of MARY ANN SMITH DIXON 
Written By Herself 

Provo City 
17 Mar. 1892 

I was born in Hull, Yorkshire, England, October 3rd 1851. My 
father's name was Robert Smith, born in Patrington, Yorkshire, 
England in the year 1815 and died in Hull, England, November 10, 
1864. My mother's name was Mary Brown Smith born in Preston, 
Yorkshire, England in the year 1811. They were married Christmas 
Day 1835. My mother died June 1 1 , 1858 at Hull, England. Both 
my parents and five of their children were buried in Hedon Church 
Yard, Yorkshire, England. 

My brothers and sisters were: George, Ann Amelia, and William, 
who all died as infants. Hannah died when 10 or 11 years of age. 
Robert died November 14th aged 21 years. 

William joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 
in Hull in 1863. He was baptized by Elder John Nicholson. He emi- 
grated to Utah in 1873 arriving in Salt Lake City, July 24th. He died 
the 9th of November 1887 and is buried in West Jordan. 

I was baptized in Hull by my brother, William and confirmed by 
Elder Thomas Cracroft the same day. I emigrated to Utah June 24th 
1868 on the sailing vessel Constitution. I arrived in Salt Lake City 
September 12, 1868. I was married April 13, 1869 to Henry Aldous 
Dixon in the Endowment House in Salt Lake by Pres. Daniel H. Wells. 
My husband died in Provo May 4th 1884. He was a good Latter Day 
Saint and died in the hope of a glorious resurrection. 

It is my desire to live faithful that I may be able to meet him. 

He was born in Grahamstown, Cape of Good Hope, South Africa, 
son of John Henry and Judith Dixon. 

We moved to Provo in 1871. I have been a member of the Relief 
Society since 1872. 

I have seven children: Alice Smith Dixon born Salt Lake City , 
April 29, 1870 in the Eleventh Ward; Sarah Ann Dixon, born in 
Provo, December 7th 1871; William Aldous Dixon born in Provo, 
April 21st 1873; Robert Smith Dixon born in Provo, November 10th 
1874, died December 18th 1874 of erysipeles. Albert Frederick 
Dixon born in Provo, March 31st 1876; Parley Smith Dixon born in 
Provo, June 9th 1878 and Harriet Amelia Dixon born in Provo, May 
24th 1882. 

I have a testimony of the truth of the Gospel of Jesus Christ of 
Latter Day Saints and am a polygamist wife and proud to say it, 
knowing it to be a true principle. I hope to live so that I can obtain 
an eternal salvation in the Kingdom of God. 

Your loving and affectionate Mother, 
M. A. DIXON 



140 



OLD PHOVO TaBERNaCL^ TOWER 




MARIA BROOKS DEGREE" 
1805 - 1876 




PATRIARCHAL BLESSING OF 

MARIA DEGREY 
Recorded in Book A, Page 445 



Great Salt Lake City- 
Sept. 15, 1867 



A blessing given by JOHN SMITH Patriarch upon the head of 
MARIA DE GREY daughter of Job and Elizabeth Brooks, born at 
Tipton, Staffordshire, England, April 10, 1805. 

Sr. Maria, 

In the name of Jesus of Nazareth, I lay my hands 
upon thy head in order to pronounce & seal upon thee a Patriarchal 
blessing, for thou hast desired it as a comfort unto thee and also 
that thy lineage might be made known. Therefore I say unto thee be 
firm in thy mind and let thy heart be comforted, for inasmuch as 
thou are faithful, no good thing which is necessary to make you 
comfortable in this life shall be withheld from you, for the Lord 
knoweth the integrity of thy heart and will hear & answer thy petitions 
as he hath done heretofore many times. Thou art of the house of 
Israel & shall be numbered among the elect. For thou art of the blood 
of Joseph, and shall receive thy blessings in the tribe of Ephraim, 
therefore I say unto thee slacken not thine endeavors to do good and 
every desire of thine heart in righteousness shall be granted thee, 
yea even, in the salvation of thy kindred & friends, whom thou hast 
left in thy native land. This blessing I seal upon thy head and all the 
blessings of the new and everlasting covenant and of the Redeemers 
Kingdom and I seal thee up unto Eternal life to come forth in the 
morning of the first resurrection, a saviour in thy fathers house, 
even so. Amen. 



Biography of MARIA 



B ROOKS 



DE GREY 



By Maria Dixon Taylor 

Maria Brooks DeGrey was born at Tipton, Worcestershire, Eng- 
land, April 10, 1805. She was the daughter of Job and Elizabeth Wal- 
ton Brooks. She had four brothers and four sisters whose names 
were: Daniel, married Ann Parke s on September 4, 1815 in Dudley; 
Isaac, married Harriett Parke s on September 1, 1817; James, mar- 
ried Mary Ann Jones on December 27, 1819; Job, not known if he 
married. Her sisters were: Sarah, who married Thomas Crowley; 
Mary who married Joseph Bainford; Phoebe Williams and Elizabeth. 
Her parents were highly respected and well to do people of Tipton. 

One of the brothers became a minister. The other brothers were 
operating the various shops in a large iron works owned and operated 
by their father. 

Maria's family was very much opposed to her marrying John 
DeGrey, because he was a poor man. She knew she loved him and 
that was more important to her than money. She was young and am- 
bitious and could financially help her young husband in many ways. 

John was a tailor by trade, and worked hard to establish a com- 
fortable home for his wife and rapidly increasing family. Maria re- 
quested him to teach her the tailor trade so that she could help him. 
John consented to this, and Maria became very efficient and was 
able to carry on the tailor trade which left her husband free to pro- 
cure other work in the nearby brewry. His work in the damp brewry 
basement aggravated and brought on lung trouble, from which he died 
at the early age of 47. He was buried in the Dudley Church Yard. 
Financially, the death of her husband was a great blow to Maria, for 
now there was only one pair of hands to work and support her young 
family, instead of the two. 

As time went on, her eldest son Alfred married Maria Raybould. 
Her eldest daughter, Selena, married John C. Hall, who later became 
President of the local Branch of the L.D.S. Church. 

One day a cousin of Maria's came in and said, "Have you heard 
about a strange religion and preachers traveling through here. I Would 
like to go and hear them, will you go with me? " She went and was 
convinced it was the true religion. 

The spirit of gathering to Zion came upon her immediately, as it 
did nearly every convert. She still had six living children. Having 
buried three, one a boy named after his father, and two girls. All 
were small when they died. 

Maria decided to sell everything she had, and left her home in 
Dudley for America. Alfred had not accepted the Gospel, so he and 
his wife remained behind. Selena and her husband could not go to 
Utah, at that time, as he was a missionary and Branch President of 
the Birmingham Conference. The mother and four daughters, Kezia, 
Maria, Charlotte and Sarah, embarked in a sailing vessel. As their 



141 



142 



MARIA BROOKS DE GREY 



means was limited, they had to travel in the lowest class and the cheap- 
est food, but their courage was high. 

Many interesting events took place during their six weeks voyage. 
One day as they were nearing Boston, the negro cook stabbed the stew- 
ard, which caused a great commotion amongst the passengers, and for 
a time it looked like there would be a riot. Before the ship landed, a 
police boat came into the harbor and took the negro into custody. 

When they landed this little family were without funds. The mother 
had great faith and trusted in her Heavenly Father to direct them to wh 
ere they could secure work. 

The family had to separate, which was a great trial to the mother 
and the daughters. Maria secured work at the home of a Mr. Coburn 
of Boston, owner of a large shoe manufacturing plant. Sarah, the 
youngest, was sent several miles away to the home of an old minister 
and his wife. She became so homesick, they had to put her to bed. 
The old lady took her a plate upstairs with old dry crusts she could 
not eat, and a bunch of grapes. The fruit was eaten but the crusts were 
left. She became so ill and weak, word was sent to the mother. She 
asked Mr. Coburn if it would be possible to bring her little girl to 
their home, where she could take care of her. She was only eleven 
years old. He was very kind and said she could be a companion for 
his little girl, who was the same age. 

Charlotte also became ill, and the mother's courage nearly failed 
her at times, as she thought of her little girls in different homes in a 
big city. But again she felt it would only be for a short time. For 
just as soon as they could save enough money, it would take them 
across the plains to Utah. 

One day, Mr. Coburn was reading the paper at the dinner table. 
Maria was serving the meal, and she heard him remark that a most 
wonderful thing had happened. A steamship named, George Washing- 
ton, had arrived from England in three weeks instead of six weeks, 
the fastest time of the sailing vessels. Maria said, "Did you say the 
George Washington had arrived?" He said, "Yes. " She then said, 
"If that is right I must prepare to leave you for I have a daughter and 
son-in-law on that boat and we will be leaving for the West. " He then 
wanted to know where, and she told him to Utah. He gasped and said, 
"Please Mrs. DeGrey, don't go out there. Don't you know the Govern- 
ment Troops, Johnston's Army, is on their way to wipe out the Morm- 
ons? You have been with us eight months and we all love you so much. 
I will take your little girl, Sarah, for a companion for my little girl, 
and will feed and clothe and school her, and make a fine lady out of 
her. " Maria thanked him kindly for all he had done for she and her 
children, but if the Mormons were to be wiped out, she would be one 
with them. 

With the money she and her daughters had accumulated, John C. 



MARIA BROOKS DE GREY 



143 



Hall purchased a yoke of oxen, a yoke of cows and a wagon and started 
on their trek of a thousand miles West. 

They were in Jesse B. Martin's Company. Many times their wagon 
was several miles in the rear of the Company. On one such occasion, 
the girls were picking wild berries. They had been warned never to go 
far from the wagon. In the distance they saw clouds of dust, so off to 
the wagon they ran, barely climbing inside before several Indians 
rode up. The Indians pulled the wagon cover aside which frightened 
the little children who were under it. They finally tried to stop the 
oxen and cows, bnt John Hall cracked his whip and shouted to keep 
them going. Maria had heard the word "Howdy" and as they rode in 
front of the wagon. Maria pretended to be very brave and would nod 
her head and say "Howdy". The Indians scowled at her and it began 
to look like they meant mischief. Finally, John said, pointing his 
finger, "Captain, Company ahead". The Indians looked at each other 
and began to talk. Finally they rode up out of the ravine where they 
consulted with about thirty more of their companions. The Indians lo- 
oked in the distance and sighted the Company about three miles ahead, 
then rode off, much to the relief of those in the wagon. 

The girls walked the entire distance of a thousand miles, clinging 
onto the back of the wagon as it went through the Platte River and oth- 
er streams. It was always a relief to the mother to see them safely 
across stream on the other side. 

In the mornings, the cows were milked. The milk was put in a 
tin can with a lid on. When they arrived at camp at night, they had 
little balls of butter, formed in the can, for their supper by the jolt- 
ing wagon. 

As they neared their journey's end, the cattle became thin and 
weak. One day a Company came along with some Texas steers that 
were fat and ready for the yoke. They unyoked the cows and replaced 
them with these steers. Maria was leading one of the cows when she 
first viewed the Valley. She felt as Brigham Young said, "This is the 
Place", and was perfectly contented. The cow must have felt the same, 
for it layed down and, Maria by its side, went to sleep. 

Their first home was in the Eleventh Ward, Salt Lake City, be- 
tween Brigham Street and First South on Seventh East Street. The 
house consisted of one log room with a dirt roof. She was a very neat 
housekeeper and had dainty white curtains to the windows, and valen- 
ces around the bed. When the rain came, it ran through the dirt roof, 
and left mud streaked on the white washed logs, as well as soiling the 
curtains and other furnishings. 

Her daughters were all married while still young, as most of the 
girls did at that time. She worked hard, doing washing and ironing 
for some of the wealthier families of the City, but she was thankful to 
be financially independent. Her son Alfred and family came to Utah 



144 



MARIA BROOKS DE GREY 



in 1868, which made her very happyco have all of her children with her. 

John Hall, soon after arriving in the valley, took Kezie as a plural 
wife. They were called to help settle the Dixie Country. Her daughter 
Maria, married Charles N. Smith, and they were called to the same 
Mission. He was Bishop of Rockville for many years, and Maria, his 
wife, was the post mistress and first telegraph operator. They suffer- 
ed many hardships, but through their untiring efforts were able to tun- 
nel through rock ledges and build a canal which brought water onto a 
dry, barren bench, and made it "blossom as the rose". This is now 
the beautiful little town called Hurricane. 

George Badley, Charlotte's husband, was called to the Dixie coun- 
try, taking his wife Charlotte with him. Her first child was born in a 
dugout in the side of a hill. They only remained in Dixie a short time, 
when they were released to return to Salt Lake on account of his Health 
This pleased Mother DeGrey, as her youngest daughter, Sarah, had 
married Henry Aldous Dixon. He had come from South Africa, across 
the plains in the same Company as had Mother DeGrey and her family. 

After Henry and Sarah were married, they lived next to Mother 
DeGrey until Brigham Young called him to Provo to take charge of the 
Woolen Mills, when it was first opened. The mother was still happy 
to have Sarah living only fifty miles from her. 

She died as she had lived; a true Latter Day Saint, and an unself- 
ish woman, on April 12, 1876, in Salt Lake City, Utah. 



JOHN DEGREI DIXON 
1867 - 1923 




Biography of JOHN DE GREY DIXON 
By Maria Dixon Taylor 

John DeGrey Dixon was born in Salt Lake City, on July 16, 1867. 
His father, Henry Aldous Dixon, was born in Grahamstown, Cape 
Colony, South Africa, the son of John Henry Dixon of London, England. 
In 1820 John Henry left his native land with a company of about 5 000 
people, for South Africa to help settle that part of the country. These 
people were divided into groups or parties with a captain over each. 
John Henry's group was called the Dixon Party, as he was the Captain. 

Henry Aldous Dixon's mother was Judith Boardman, daughter of 
the 1st Colonial Minister. Henry Aldous was born March 14, 1835. 
The first Mormon missionaries to that far off land South Africa, taught 
and explained the principles of the Gospel of Jesus Christ to Henry A. , 
who accepted and joined the L. D. S. Church upon reaching the age of 
21. He left Africa in 1856 and arrived in Salt Lake City in 1857. In 
I860 he went back to his native land on a mission for his Church. He 
spent five years in the mission field and returned in 1864. On January 
21,1865 he married Sarah DeGrey, daughter of John and Maria Brooks 
DeGrey. She was born in Dudley, England. The first son of the Dixon's, 
Henry Alfred, died July 1, 1867. Two years later their second son 
John DeGrey, the subject of this sketch, was born. 

When John was about five years of age, his father was called by 
President Brigham Young to go to Provo. The Provo Woolen Mills 
began its first operation and Henry was to act as its first secretary. 

John acquired his early education in the public schools of Provo. 
Afterwards he attended the Brigham Young Academy, now known as 
Brigham Young University. 

His time was spent like most boys of his age, doing chores, milk- 
ing cows, tending horses, chopping wood, which was of great import- 
ance at that time, as coal was very hard to get. He assumed respons- 
ibility while very young and was always dependable, which proved a 
blessing to his mother and those who had to depend upon him later. 
He was hardly 17 years of age when a great sorrow came to their home. 
The father, only 49 years of age, was called to leave them after only 
a short week of illness. He died on the 4th of May 1884 of pneumonia. 
He left two wives and 13 children. Three weeks after the father' s 
death, Arnold, John's youngest brother, was born. This making 14 
children to provide for. John being the eldest, felt the responsibility 
keenly. 

He started out upon his business career as bookkeeper in the em- 
ploy of Samuel Liddiard, a building contractor. He remained with him 
for three years. John was also clerk of the School Board at the same 
time. He became connected with the Provo Lumber & Building Co. , 
where he worked for four years. Then he entered into active assoc- 
iation with the Taylor Brothers Company at its incorporation and act- 



145 



146 



JOHN DE GREY DIXON 



ed as Secretary and Treasurer of the Company. 

He was chosen a member of the Provo City Council and was instru- 
mental in having rescinded a contract with a company that was to build 
and operate the waterworks for Provo. The contract was very unfair 
and unwise in many particulars, and instead of being carried out, the 
City built its own splendid waterworks system, which has proven 
quite successful and has saved a large amount of money to the resid- 
ents of Provo. 

In the History "Utah Since Statehood", I find a sketch of the life of 
John. I will quote from one or two paragraphs: 

"It was Mr. Dixon's business standing and well known ability that 
led to his election to the office of State Treasurer in 1900 on the Repub- 
lican ticket, being the 2nd State Treasurer of Utah. He filled this pos- 
ition for four years, and while incumbent in the office conceived a plan, 
after a study of the laws of Iowa, California and other states, that led 
him to prepare a bill to tax foreign corporations stocks. The income 
thus derived has been very great, in fact, it has been sufficient to pay 
for the beautiful new capitol building of Utah, which was erected at a 
cost of three million dollars. " 

After his term of office expired as State Treasurer, he was ap- 
pointed as Secretary of the State Land Board, and served in that capa- 
city for two years, after which he resigned to become cashier and man- 
ager of the Farmers and Merchants Bank, which had just been estab- 
lished in 1906. 

On the 18th of September 1889, he was married to Sarah Lewis, 
a daughter of Bishop William J. Lewis of the Provo Third Ward and 
Jane Davis Lewis, a former resident of Wales. This union proved a 
very happy one and they continued as lovers until the day of John's 
death, which occured October 4, 1923. 

Much credit is due his wife, she backed him in everything he 
did, which was a big factor in the success of his business career, as 
well as his high standing in religious affairs. 

John was a very religious boy from his childhood and all through 
his life. In 1896 he left his wife and children to answer a call to the 
mission field for his Church. He was assigned to the Southern States 
Mission where he served as President of the Virginia Conference for 
two years. 

For several years he acted as President of the Y.M. M. I. A. of 
Utah Stake. He was a member of the High Council of Utah Stake at 
the time of his death, where he had served for 15 years. 

While living in Salt Lake, as Utah State Treasurer, he became a 
member of the Bishopric of the Thirtieth Ward with Heber C. Cutler 
as Bishop and Charles Cottrell as Counselor. During World War One 
he gave much time to the promotion of Liberty Loan Bonds and other 



JOHN DE GREY DIXON 



147 



phases of War work. He was also a member of Provo Commercial 
Club. 

John had many hobbies, but I think farming and fruit raising were 
the most outstanding. His orchard, consisting of 40 acres of peaches, 
was a great pride to him, although the work and responsibility was 
far too great for him. It was necessary for him to load cars of peach- 
es and ship to Eastern markets, as well as carry on his work at the 
Bank. At one time while helping load a fruit car at night on a railroad 
spur, in the darkness, he fell thru a cattle guard and broke his nose. 
This shook him up considerably and undermined his health. Three ye- 
ars later he passed away without a moments warning. We were all so 
shocked and it cast a gloom over the whole community. 

The following was taken from an Extra Edition of the Provo 
Herald, a short time after the news was received: 

"Thursday the news of greatest importance to the people of Provo 
and Utah County, was the death of John DeGrey Dixon Financier, Ch- 
urch man, farmer, and citizen of first rank. 

Mr. Dixon passed away without warning, suddenly, and at a mom- 
ent when his physician and friends believed him on the road to comp- 
lete recovery. This was at 4 o'clock in the afternoon. The Herald Pr- 
ess already had been turning out papers for nearly an hour. 

The moment when the news of Mr. Dixon's death came in the 
Herald Office, the press was stopped, the papers already printed and 
not distributed to carriers, were held for out of the State mails, and 
the first page of the paper made over. Two reporters had hurried to 
the home to obtain the facts of Mr. Dixon's death. Another was busy 
preparing the biographical sketch of Mr. Dixon. All this was being 
set as rapidly as two linotypes could do the work. At exactly fifty 
minutes after 4 o'clock the first Herald Extra, containing Mr. Dixon's 
picture and the report of his death and a sketch of life, were being 
distributed. 

Gloom and sadness filled the hearts of thousands of people of 
Provo and vicinity, who during their long association with Mr. Dixon 
had learned to love and respect him for his sterling qualities. 

The farmers and fruit growers of the district, whom Mr. Dixon 
had befriende d and assisted at every opportunity were especially grief 
stricken, realizing they had lost a genuine friend and benefactor, one 
who understood their problems as clearly or perhaps better than they 
themselves, one who helped tide them over their hard times, when 
they could not get help elsewhere. " 

Scores of tributes paid to this good man were published in the 
daily papers. The following tribute from Charles R. Mabey, Gover- 
nor of Utah: 



148 



JOHN DE GREY DIXON 



"The State of Utah stands with bowed head, silently grieving the 
loss of John DeGrey Dixon, one of her best loved and staunchest sons. 
As a servant of his State, his Church and all the banking institutions 
to which he gave the last year of his life, he leaves a record of quiet 
unassuming efficiency, shot through with the spirit of gentleness and 
service. His State is blessed in having had John D. Dixon with her. 

I know of no man who can face the great Examiner before whom 
our friend has been summoned and have the records of his life in clean- 
er condition for that examination to which we must all some time sub- 
mit. " 

Space will permit me to quote only a few of the many tributes 
which covered the front page of the local paper: 
"Dixon the Community Builder" 

"The entire community is shocked and bowed in sorrow at the sud- 
den death of our fellow citizen, John D. Dixon. His loss is one of the 
greatest which Provo has sustained for some time and will be felt thr- 
ough out the State . 

Even though cut short in life, his great industry has enabled him 
to accumulate more than many are able to do in a much longer time. 
There have been no idle or misdirected moments in his life. Not only 
has been untiring in his efforts to build up the community industrially, 
but he has contributed most liberally of his time and means for the 
good of his fellowmen. 

His was a judgement which placed him on the right side of every 
problem. His association in business, in church and civic organiza- 
tions seldom passed a measure or made an important decision without 
his counsel. 

His modesty was such that he never pushed himself forward, so 
he may not be as widely known as others, but he was one of the great 
men of our community. His kindness and sympathy have endeared 
him to thousands of the people through out the West, who will mourn 
his loss. John D. Dixon was one of the most substantial men of my 
acquaintance. A thoroughly good citizen, not only of the State, but a 
devoted member of his Church." F. S. Harris, President 

Brigham Young University 

"Dixon the Employer" 

"In passing out of life of Cashier John D. Dixon, the employees 
of the Farmers and Merchants Bank feel that they have lost their best 
friend. He was always cheerful no matter what his worries or troubles 
we re . 

Always on entering the bank in the morning he would greet each 
of the employees with a smile and pleasant "Good Morning", and would 
always have some pleasant little joke to relate. He was a friend of 



JOHN DE GREY DIXON 



149 



the rich and the poor alike. He was a thorough business man and yet 
possessed a tender heart full of feeling and sympathy for anyone in 
need. 

He was never too tired or busy to hear the troubles of his friends 
and aid in every way possible to drive trouble or misfortune away from 
the path of anyone. In fact, many times he would go out of his way to 
comfort and cheer the distressed. 

The Bank lost a man whom it will be very hard indeed to replace. 
The community will suffer his sudden departure and the employees of 
the bank will miss his cheerful and pleasant association." 

Ole E. Olsen, Jr. 

In behalf of the Employees 

"Dixon the Neighbor" 

"of all my acquaintences , John D. Dixon was my dearest friend. 
I have known him ever since I remember anyone and he was always 
just the same. A kindly spirit to all men whatever their station in life, 
always a friend to the unfortunate and needy, always radiant of good 
cheer and always an encouraging word and sympathetic understanding. 

Tolerant of the opinions of others, patient in his own afflications , 
a kind and loving father - a life devoted to service and unselfishness. " 

F. S. Davie s, Manager 
J. C. Penney Company 

Many other tributes were listed as "Dixon the Father", "Dixon 
the Man", "Dixon the Friend" , "Dixon the Citizen" , "Dixon the Banker", 
"Dixon the Ward Worker", and "Dixon the Farmer's Friend", etc, etc. 

An account published in the Herald of the funeral service is as 
follows : 

"Men and women from every walk in life and from every commun- 
ity of Utah County and other parts of the State, gathered at the Stake 
Tabernacle in Provo Sunday afternoon to pay respects to the memory 
of one of Provo's foremost citizens, John DeGrey Dixon, Utah's sec- 
ond State Treasurer, who died at his home Thursday afternoon. 

Every seat in the large Tabernacle was occupied and the aisles 
and doorways were lined with people; more than 2000 people being 
present. It was the largest audience ever to attend a funeral in Provo. 

The Tabernacle Choir was under the direction of Prof. J. R. 
Boshard. Eloquent tributes were paid by the following speakers: 
President S. P. Eggertsen, representing the Stake Presidency; Gov- 
ernor Charles R. Mabey; President Emeritus George H. Brimhall; 
Senator Charles Cottrell of Salt Lake. 

George Albert Smith of the Council of Twelve, representing the 
First Presidency, said that many of the General Authorities of the 



150 



JOHN DE GREY DIXON 



Church would have been present at the funeral services, had it not 
have been for the closing session of the General Conference. Presi- 
dent Heber J. Grant told him to convey to the family the message that 
when he was President of the General Board of Y.M. M. I. A. , John 
Dixon was one of the most able Stake Presidents of the organizations. 
President Grant also told Mr. George Albert Smith that Brother Dixon 
was one of the few men in politics who has been able to stand firm in 
the faith, notwithstanding his participation in political matters." 

Bishop George Powelson was in charge of the services. One of 
the largest funeral corteges ever seen in Provo accompanied the body 
to the Provo Cemetery, where the grave was dedicated by Bishop 
Heber S. Cutler of Salt Lake City. 11 

John DeGrey Dixon was the father of the following seven children: 

Henry Aldous Born June 29, 18 90 Married Lucille Knowlden 

John William Born Sept. 6, 1892 Died June 6, 1894 

Stanley Lewis Born Mar. 3, 1895 Married Luella Madsen (div. ) 



Maurine We Ike r 



Rulon Sterling 
Maud 
Lucian 
Grant 



Born Sept. 9, 1898 11 Erma Murdock 

Born Feb. 29, 1901 " Fred L. Markham 

Born Jun. 17, 1903 Died March 22, 1904 

Born Mar. 30, 1905 Died Dec. 18, 1905 



MY FOLKS ON FIFTH WEST 
By Rulon S. Dixon 
February 1 964 

Aldous was up last night and we were talking about Dad. I just 
happened to think that you kids did not know him. You have read in 
the History of Utah about his political life but to know him was really 
a joy. I haven't the ability to describe him, but in my feeble way will 
try to give you an idea of what he was like. I think the best way would 
be to take a trip from our home in Provo to the Bank - - about six and 
one half blocks. 

Pop told me one noon to stick around as he wanted me to go down 
to John T. Taylor's with him to pick up some groceries. I knew some- 
thing was up as we didn't buy groceries at John T' sunless it was some- 
thing special. He had the best store in town and was a director of the 
Bank and Dad's close friend but they decided it best for us to buy at 
our next door grocery as he needed the business and banked with us. 

He went into the kitchen and I heard him say to mother that he 
thought the Lord would forgive him for sending Aunt Annie some tea 
and it would make the grand old lady very happy. I now knew the rea- 
son for my trip to John T's as his was the only store that carried 
"English Breakfast Tea", also he would not talk about it. Now Aunt 
Annie wasn't really our aunt, but a lovely character about seventy- 
five years old who was converted to the Church in England and a "spot" 
of tea" was her life. She knew it was wicked but it was her medicine 
for "medicinal purposes only". 

As we started out, mother gave us some date -nut bread and pie 
to give to Sister Brown on our way to the Bank. Uncle Roy, Dad's 
brother, who lived next door, called to us. He said he would drop 
in at the bank to see Dad a little later. 

You didn't know Uncle Roy but he as a man was liked by every- 
body. He had a terrific drive and while he died in his early forties, 
he had been Mayor of Provo two or three terms, a member of the 
State Senate year after year, founder and President of Dixon Real Es- 
tate Co. and the Provo Ice and Cold Storage Co. , President of sever- 
al Clubs, an avid sportsman, a High Church official and everyone 
said he was a sure shot for Governor of Utah. He was good enough to 
sell Aldous the corner lot he was saving for his children so Aldous 
could live next to him and Dad. (About 408 North Fifth West. ) 

As we left Aldous 1 place, Dad asked me if I shouldn't bring a 
pony down from the farm for Aldous' kids and fix their roller skates 
(nothing was too good for those grandkids. ) 

In the next block was Uncle Tom Taylor's home. He was Dad's 
business partner in the founding of Taylor Bros. Co. , the Farmers 
& Merchants Bank and the Taylor Investment Co. He was President 
of the Bank, Stake President, President of the B. Y. U. Executive 



151 



152 



MY FOLKS ON FIFTH WEST 



Committee. He had been defeated in the race for Governor by- 
Charles R. Mabey, a Republican. He wasn't really our uncle but 
his brother, Arthur N. , the father of Arthur, Elton, Lynn, Henry, 
et al, married father's sister, Aunt Rye. 

When we crossed the street to make our delivery to Sister Brown, 
we waived to Uncle Charles' kids (they lived on the corner of 5th West 
and 3rd North only on the west side of the street). Uncle Charles ran 
the Dixon Ranch Co. and the South Fork Cattle Co. All owned entirely 
by the Dixon Brothers. Uncle Charles had been a bricklayer but 
got his leg crushed in laying brick on the Third Ward Meeting House. 
He was a great horseman. 

Next to Sister Brown's place lived Aunt Rene, Uncle Arthur's 
widow. Arthur was the virtual owner of the Provo Pressed Brick Co. 
and by all odds the most prominent contractor in the County. He had 
just completed the building for the Murdock Power Plant and was leav- 
ing for home when the electrical contractor asked him and one of his 
men to help move a dynamo. Uncle Art and his men were carrying 
the back end and the electrical contractor and his man the front. The 
contractor bumped into a live wire and the charge went through him 
and the dynamo and killed Uncle Art and his man. 

We then crossed back over the street as all the "small fry" were 
waiting for Uncle John. It was always the same. Dad would say that 
he just happened to go in Sam Kopp's (the local candy store ) and 
had a pocket full of jelly beans, licorice and "jaw breakers" and each 
kid was to have his favorite. He never missed or passed them up; he 
was Uncle John not only to the Dixons but also to every kid on "Sandy 
Alley". 

Grandma Dixon's home was next to Aunt Rye Taylor's in this block. 
Dad's youngest brother, Uncle Arnold and family lived there. He had 
worked for Dad in Salt Lake when Dad was State Treasurer and Sec- 
retary of the State Land Board and had been with the Bank from the 
beginning. Dad was really the only father Uncle Arnold ever knew be- 
cause his father died six months before Arnold was born. Arnold was 
a very good boxer and spent a lot of time with us kids in a little gym 
in the barn which he had rigged up. He gave me the first bantams I 
ever had. 

Uncle Arthur Taylor's place was the next stop. He married Aunt 
Rye, father's only sister, who always was so close to Mother and Dad. 
They had started the seven Dixon-Taylor-Russell stores and were such 
a model family. All six boys served missions; four - Arthur, Elton, 
Lynn D. and Henry D. were Bishops and Henry D. is now an Assistant 
Apostle . 

In the same block was Aunt Louie, Uncle Walter's widow. That 
is Buck and Sanky's home. Uncle Walter named his boys Fred and 



MY FOLKS ON FIFTH WEST 



153 



Donald so they couldn't be nicknamed but no one today knows those 
famous athletes by any other name than "Buck and "Sanky". Well, 
we called to see if everything was under control. Uncle Walter died 
following an operation for ulcers of the stomach when he was a very 
young man. He loved kids as much as Dad and had the same habit of 
dropping in on all the homes either after work or before work every 
day. He gave up every holiday to the kids. They planned basketball 
and skating in the winter; and tennis, baseball and Timpanogos hikes 
in the summer. He was a remarkable athlete and was an easy winner 
as the best liked man in Provo. He was a camera fan and wrote to 
everyone on birthdays often including a picture of them or their kids; 
often hand colored with a little verse he had written e spe cially for the 
occasion. Verses just dripped with good old-fashioned sentiment - - 
but did people love it! 

One door south and across the street we passed the Catholic 
Church (only a basement affair at the time. ) Father Delaire was dir- 
ecting some of his parishoners at work on the grounds. Dad asked 
him how he ever got so many out to work and the good Father said he 
showed the boys the error of their ways and where they would go if 
they didn't repent. He then thanked Dad for sending him the seed to 
plant. 

We then proceeded nearly two blocks south, without incident, when 
Dad spotted a Dixon Coal Co. truck loaded with coal and stopped the 
driver. He told Jake, the driver, to take some coal and kindling over 
to Brother Jones and tell Jones that John had asked him to dump off a 
little (2 tons). Well, hadn't Bro. Jones been sick for a long time and 
didn't he, Uncle Roy and Charles have a coal yard? 

As we passed the Blumenthal Plumbing Co. , the owner, Henry 
Blumenthal, (he was a Mason and didn't bank at the Bank) stopped Dad 
to tell him he was bringing the big shot of the Masons to see Dad at 
the Bank that morning. 

Next was Duckett's Barber Shop. Dad asked if I still got my hair 
cut there. (What if Brother Duckett did put a bowl over your head to 
keep your hair even. Wasn't Bro. Duckett an English convert, didn't 
he need the trade and didn't he bank at the Bank? ) 

Clara Kopp, Sam Kopp's daughter saw us passing, dashed out to 
tell Dad that she and Jerry were going to be married and thanked Dad 
for speaking to Sam (her father) on Jerry's behalf. It seemed that 
everytime Clara had a boy friend, Sam would chase him away as 
"none of them was good enough for Clara". (Clara was no spring 
chicken). Dad had it doped out that Sam just didn't want to lose a 
clerk who was for free. Dad pointed out that Jerry was off Satur- 
days and Sundays which were Sam's two big days and that Jerry could 
pinch hit for Sam. He told Sam he needed the rest, and that he would 



154 



MY FOLKS ON FIFTH WEST 



only make "Clarie" happy but also get another Clerk for free. 

When you opened Sam's door, you nearly passed out unless you 
were German and then it was another world. He not only had the best 
assortment of penny candy this side of Denver, but was also loaded 
with open ten gallon barrels of cabbage, sauerkraut, dried fish, frag- 
rant Kammerbert and Limburger cheese and Schnapps all fresh from 
the "Fatherland". 

We dropped into Bro. Anderson's butcher shop to see about his 
remodeling and plans to carry first grade meat. We had to patronize 
him; though his meat was tough and the shop a little dirty (the under- 
statement of the year. ) Didn't he need the business and didn't he bank 
at the Bank? 

On the corner Louie Gaudio raced out and put a cigar in Dad's 
pocket for the birth of child number twelve, ("the strongest kid you 
ever saw"). He asked Dad if he couldn't stand just "one snort of Dago 
Red", real stuff. He made it himself . 

We pass the next two stores as they don't bank with the Bank or 
belong to the Church. 

As we passed Steve Bee's, the local saddlery, Steve tells us it 
just happens that this very morning he took in a used harness on a 
trade and he just knew Johnny could use it on the farm. We looked it 
over and boy had this harness "ever had it"but with a little repair and 
saddle soap, Steve said it would be as good as new (and would cost 
just as much as a new one). I finally talked Dad out of it since I worked 
on the farm. 

It was impossible to get him past Al Van Wagenen's garage, where 
they sold Saxon cars. Al wasn't there but he had a used one that Dad 
could buy. (You always purchased Saxons in pairs, one to pull the 
other one home. ) We looked at the used car and was it a fugitive from 
the junkyard! 

Our local blacksmith called us over across the street to see a new 
saddle horse Will Knight had brought from Kentucky, and was it a 
beauty! But by the time we got out of the blacksmith shop, Dad had 
purchased a used plow and cultivator. (It just happened that he had 
Johnnie in mind when he took them in on a trade. ) 

Before we parted at the Bank, he told me had had made a date with 
Mom and Sis to go to the show that night. We had an early dinner that 
night and then Dad, Mom, Sis and I walked to the "Ellen Theater". 
(We always walked in spite of owning a Saxon car. ) We always went to 
the "Ellen". Weren't the Epperson boys, who owned it, having a hard 
time, and didn't they bank with us? Besides this, the other shows were 
owned by "outsiders" and none of them banked at our Bank. The film 
made no difference to Dad and Mom as they were always both so tired 



MY FOLKS ON FIFTH WEST 



155 



that they fell asleep five minutes after the show started. No matter 
how hard they thumped the piano (they followed the picture and made 
up the music to fit the intensity of the scene) it didn't disturb the rest 
in the least. When Dad and Mom had slept for about an hour, Sis and 
I would shake them and tell them the show was over, especially if it 
happened to be dull. 

Then on cold nights we always walked up to the Commercial Bank 
corner to Cory's pop corn wagon and bought peanuts for Mom and a 
hot meat pie for Dad, Sis and me. When he opened that broiler and 
the smell of those hot meat pies hit the air, it made me almost deli- 
rious. He'd take the pie out and from a big can with a spout on it, he 
would give the pie a couple of squirts and order a "Golden West". 
It started out like a banana split, but from there on out any similarity 
was coincidental -a split banana, a scoop of strawberry ice cream, 
one of vanilla and one of chocolate with a choice of syrups. Around 
the banana was brandied fruit with a cherry on top. This was the plain 
one. The deluxe one was smothered with pecan halves with a rosette 
of whipped cream, and a candle stuck in the strawberry and chocolate 
and an American flag in the center of the vanilla. When they served 
it, they would light the candle with a flourish and every one would 
look on with envy (really a thing of beauty, about 2, 000 calories and 
about as many nightmares in each one), then home. Dad and Mother 
used to sleep on the open sleeping porch, winter and summer, no 
matter how cold the weather. Mom always had one foot out of the 
covers. She "just seemed smothered" if she didn't. 

I know this is a weak attempt to give you a peek at your Grandpa. 
He would no doubt have spoiled you because he knew what kid's dreams 
are made of and as far as he could, he made them come true. You 
would have had the"mostest and the bestest",for didn't we have any toy 
basketball, etc. at Taylor Brothers and the finest ponies on the farm? 

When he died they put out a special edition of the paper. The flag 
hung at half mast on the State Capitol. They closed all business houses 
in Provo during the funeral. Hundreds packed the Provo Tabernacle 
and hundreds were turned away. The Provo Herald says it was the 
biggest funeral Provo ever had. He made his way from bricklayer to 
bookkeeper, from bookkeeper to City Recorder, to City Councilman, 
to businessman, to State Treasurer, to Secretary of the State Land 
Board, co-founder of the Farmers and Merchants Bank, farmer and 
pioneer of Provo Bench (Orem), its water and economy. 

As one paper put it "hundreds from every walk of life paid their 
respects to John DeGrey Dixon". It was every walk of life that best 
described him - - from the town drunk to the Governor - -they were 
his friends. 

In Dad you had a man of boundless energy, great ability, tremend- 



156 



MY FOLKS ON FIFTH WEST 



ous loyalty, and as one paper put it, " He stood like the Rock of Gil- 
br alter asking no quarter and giving no quarter if he thought he was in 
the right. " In dealing with people he was kind almost to a fault. It was 
the standing joke of the town how "John Dixon could turn a man down 
on a loan and have the man go away from the bank feeling better than 
Jos. Farrer's customers felt when he made them the loan. " 

Dad had a code of ethics which he applied to himself that it would 
take a saint to live by. He was a true Christian not because it was 
expected of him but because he wanted it that way. If he had a fault 
(besides his yean for horses and second hand bargains) it was that he 
believed there was some good in everyone - - and they sometimes let 
him down. He was the last man people wanted to beat out of money. 
It was also a point of common knowledge and gossip that in times of 
depression, insolvent people and firms could come into the bank and 
pay Dad what they owed him before taking out bankruptcy. 

If you had asked him what inspired him most, he would have said 
his wife, Sarah. What did I like about him? It was that Sarah was 
his best girl until the day he died. WHAT A GUY ! 



JOHN DE GREY DIXON FAMILY 

John D., Rulon S., Henry Aldous II Stanley, 
Sarah L, and Maud 




HOME at UUQ No. 5th West 
Provo, Utah 



ARTHUR DE GREY LIXON 
1869 - 1911 




Catherine Morgan Dixon 



Biography of ARTHUR DE GREY DIXON 



By Arthur D. Taylor 

Arthur DeGrey Dixon known by us all as Uncle Art Dixon was the 
third child of Henry Aldous and Sarah DeGrey Dixon. He was born in 
Salt Lake City, Utah, ten minutes past seven p.m. , October 5, 1869. 
When he was about three years old he moved to Provo with his folks, 
at the time his father was sent by Brigham Young to keep the books of 
the Provo Woolen Mills. 

Art was a robust, healthy lad, well built and very good looking. 
It was said that there was none of the boys near his age that could 
throw him in a wrestling match. He was the tallest of the Dixon boys. 
Very early in life he was employed by the Liddiards' and Collins' who 
were rock and brick masons. He learned this trade and had the repu- 
tation of being one of the best brick layers in Utah County. 

As he grew to manhood he went into business for himself and was 
a very successful contractor. He worked on the B. Y. U. buildings, 
now known as the lower campus. He assisted in building the State 
Mental Hospital and many of Provo 1 s best homes and business houses. 
Scores of school houses and public buildings in various parts of the 
State were built under his direction. 

He was a pupil of Dr. Karl G. Maeser when the B. Y. Academy 
was located in the old ZCMI warehouse at Provo. He was especially 
apt in mathematics which was useful to him in his contracting business. 
He was loved by his workmen and companions and had a heart as big 
as the moon and would give his last cent to a man in need. 

He loved the out-of-doors. He was a great fisherman. His great- 
est fun was a day fishing up the Provo River. Several times each year 
he would take Al Davis, his fishing pal, or get some of his friends and 
go to Strawberry Valley or into the Indian Reservation country for 
weeks at a time on a fishing trip. It was said, "If a fish was in the 
stream, Art Dixon would get it". 

His social life was with his pals. He was bashful around women 
and it looked like he would never marry. He was considered an old 
batch, but Aunt Rene came along and when he was 36 years old she 
married him. He built a nice, new, brick home for his bride on Fifth 
West, across the street from his Mother's home . They had a very 
happy life together, even though it was for a short time. 

Aunt Rene liked many things that Uncle Art liked. She was an ex- 
pert horsewoman. Uncle Art had a beautiful black mare that he called 
Bess. She was a high spirited animal and could travel like the wind. 
Very few people could handle her other than Uncle Art. Aunt Rene 
was one of those few. There were few women that could handle horses 
as well as Aunt Rene. Uncle Art loved old Bess and used to ride her 
nearly everywhere he went. 



157 



158 



ARTHUR DE GREY DIXON 



Uncle Art loved children and although he never had any of his own 
he passed his love onto the children that lived on "Sandy Alley". All 
the children of the neighborhood loved him. 

His earth life experience came to an end on the 5th of June 1911. 
He was completing his contract on the Murdock Power Plant at Heber 
and was asked to assist some electricians to move a piece of machin- 
ery. One of the men ran into a live wire. He was being terribly burn- 
ed and Uncle Art ran to his rescue. He took the man's hand to pull 
him off the wire and the current went through him and killed him. He 
gave his life to help some one else. 

His death was a terrible shock to all of Provo and Utah County 
and especially to Aunt Rene, who had only had six years as his wife 
and sweetheart. 

ARTHUR D. DIXON'S DEATH 
Deseret Evening News 
Tuesday June 6, 1911 

Arthur D. Dixon who was killed at the Murdock Power Plant, own- 
ed by the Knight Co. , situated nine miles northeast of Heber; was 
brought to Provo by relatives yesterday afternoon, who went to the 
scene of the accident in the forenoon. Mr. Dixon had the contract for 
building a new transformer house and was helping to move the trans- 
former into the power house. He and William Blood of Midway, had 
hold of the side of the transformer and Earl Francom and M. V. Eard- 
ley on the other side. In passing live wires heavily charged with elect- 
tricity, Mr. Blood touched the live wire with his hip. The result was 
that heavy spitage passed through all the men and knocked them down. 
Blood died immediately and Dixon in a few minutes. Eardley and 
Francom, who were on the other side of the transformer, were not so 
seriously hurt; Francom practically escaping without injury. He was 
standing on a plank while the others stood on cement floor. Eardley 
was quite badly burned. He was taken to Salt Lake for treatment on 
yesterdays train, by way of Park City. 

Mr. Dixon was born here October 1869 and has lived here all his 
life. He was a contractor and builder of repute and an honorable, 
capable man and great sympathy is felt for his wife and his aged 
Mother, Mrs. Sarah Dixon and numerous relatives here. He was a 
brother to former State Treasurer, John D. Dixon. The time of the 
funeral has not yet been fixed. 



nrthur D, Dixon Home 
275 No. 5th West 
Provo 

Catherine M. Dixon Arthur D. Dixon 



ALICE DIXON DANGFRFIELE 
1870 - 1943 




Jabez ft. D 



ALICE SMITH DIXON DANGER FIELD 



One of the most generous and lovable individuals was born to 
Mary Smith and Henry Aldous Dixon in the Salt Lake City Eleventh 
Ward on April 29, 1869. This eldest child of Mary and the eldest 
daughter of Henry A. Dixon, was blessed and given the name of Alice 
Smith Dixon by her father on May 7, 1869. To all of her relatives and 
friends she was lovingly known as "Aunt Alice". Alice Taylor Nelson 
and Alice Dixon Andrews are proud to have the same first name. 

When just about a year old, her father was appointed by Brigham 
Young to go to Provo as Secretary and Bookkeeper of the new Provo 
Woolen Mills, which was being built. Upon completion of a new adobe 
house on the corner of Third West and Second North, she and her 
mother left Salt Lake City and moved into this new home in Provo. 

Alice was very active and energetic as a young girl. She pref- 
ferred to be out competing and playing with her older brothers and 
their boy friends than in the house playing with her doll and the girls. 

Aunt Alice and her sister Hattie had sort of reddish brown hair. 
She was not the type to spend her money on fancy clothes and the new- 
est styles, but was always neat, clean and very attractive. Her con- 
cern for the material things of life for herself, was the last thing she 
ever thought about. She was always thinking about someone else. She 
worried about her younger siste rs , Hattie and Sarah, and was always con- 
cerned with their welfare. Aunt Hattie West came to Provo from 
California and spent many vacations as Aunt Alice's guest. Aunt Alice 
cheered her up, for Aunt Hattie was ill much of her life and didn't 
have the faith and positive attitude of her sister Alice. 

Alice received a limited education in the Provo City Schools and 
was fortunate to attend the B. Y. U. (Academy) in the old Lewis Hall, 
on the corner of Center Street and Third West. She wanted her fam- 
ily to have a better education than she was able to enjoy. 

Upon the death of her father in 1884 and being the oldest of her 
mother's six children, she felt her responsibility to go to work and 
help provide for the wants of her fatherless brothers and sisters. 

Having been raised in a large family, she had acquired the art of 
cooking and especially for large numbers of people. So when she was 
offered the job as cook for Dave Stagg's railroad construction gang, 
she readily accepted. 

Later, and up to the time of her marriage, she "clerked" in the 
R. R. Irvine Dry Goods Store. Here she became a very popular and 
successful clerk. Many of the store's customers would have no other 
sales clerk wait on them but Alice Dixon. They completely relied on 
her knowledge and honesty for selecting the merchandise they needed. 

A very energetic and industrious printer by the name of Jabez W. 
Dangerfield, had moved from Salt Lake City to Provo, as a partner 
of Will Silver, an old friend and former missionary companion. They 



159 



160 



ALICE SMITH DIXON DANGERFIELD 



did business under the name of " The Grocery Job Printing Company". 

On December 5, 1900, Alice was married to Jabez W. Danger- 
field in the Salt Lake Temple. Alice then channeled all her attention 
to "keeping house" for her husband, Jabez, here in Provo. 

Their first child Jabez Aldous was born at Provo, Utah, Novem- 
ber 20, 1901. He died March 26, 1902 at Provo, Utah. 

Their second son, Royden James, was born at Provo, Utah on the 
31st of December 1902. Aunt Alice was so happy to have another boy 
after losing her first born. 

Their first daughter, Afton, was born on May 18, 1904, but she 
died on February 14, 1905. 

Twin boys, Harold and Clifford, were born the 14th of May 1906 
at Provo, Utah. Although they were not identical twins, they both 
chose the medical profession and have become prominent Doctors in 
New York State, where they practice. 

Grace Mary Dangerfield was born at Provo, Utah on the 10th of 
September 1910. Aunt Alice gloried in her daughter Grace, for she 
was the only daughter she was permitted to raise to maturity. 

Donna May was born at Provo, Utah, September 11, 1911. She 
died on March 15, 1 91 2 at Provo, Utah. 

To supplement his earnings as a printer, Jabez ventured in the 
speculative business of buying houses. He moved his family into them, 
fixed them up and then sold them for a profit. Between the years of 
his marriage in 1900 and 1909, Alice was required to pack all of her 
belongings and gather up her family and move into a different rundown 
house, at least five different times. 

In 1909 Alice and Jabez became interested in the fashionable 
"Greer House", which was located on First West Street, across the 
street west from the Old Opera House. Adjoining the re staurant, on 
the North, was a hotel, then a vacant lot and next was the Westrope 
Livery Stable. Their plans were to buy the restaurant, hotel and vac- 
ant lot, and then build a new two story building on the vacant lot. The 
ground floor and basement to be used for the printing shop and the up- 
stairs to be used by the Hotel for rented rooms. The old hotel was 
to be modernized by installing new plumbing and heating, thus making 
it into a first rate Hotel. They would lease the restaurant. Alice would 
manage the Hotel. Jabez would carry on his printing business, and 
the family could live at the Hotel and all help, when and where needed. 
The new and remodeled Hotel was given a new name, "Royden House", 
after the eldest son, Royden. 

It was really a rare treat to be invited to go to the Royden House 
and play with the Dangerfield children. There were many steps and 
long, dark corridors in which to play and pretend all sorts of imagin- 
ary things. Aunt Alice, being a good cook, always had plenty of 



ALICE SMITH DIXON DANGERFIELD 



161 



delectable foods for her guests. Her hot bread was a favored special- 
ty. She always had a surprise for us and generally sent something 
home for the family. 

The back door to John T. Taylor's Grocery Store was very con- 
veniently located adjoining the back door of the Royden House. Aunt 
Alice would give the kids some eggs and they could take them over to 
the G rocery Store and trade them for all varieties of "goodies". 

Just before it was time to go home., Aunt Alice would give her 
young visitors tickets to the merry-go-round and ferris wheel which 
was located just across the street. It was owned and operated by her 
close and valued friend, the Eldreds. This was a perfect climax to a 
wonderful visit with Aunt Alice, and would be remembered forever. 

A few weeks before Christmas time, the kids from all over town 
would go to Aunt Alice and Uncle Jabez' for scraps of various colored 
paper to make paper chains for trimming the Christmas trees or to hang 
around and decorate the rooms. No one was ever turned away empty 
handed, even if Uncle Jabez had to cut up, in strips, some perfectly 
usable paper. Their generosity was unlimited. Aunt Alice was ded- 
icated to helping the handicapped or under privileged folks she knew. 
She had the ability to project their needs into her heart and under- 
stand their desire for kindness and consideration. 

In 1924 after fifteen years residence at the Royden House, Aunt 
Alice desired to have a little more privacy and comfort in her home, 
where she could entertain her friends and relatives without the con- 
fusion and interuptions which always existed at the Hotel. So Uncle 
Jabez purchased the home of Mrs. Cy. Smith at 64 North First East, 
where they moved and lived the rest of their lives. 

Aunt Alice loved to entertain. Under most any pretext or suggest- 
ion she would invite the Dixon Sisters, or her neighbors and friends 
to her home for a party or a visit. She had a good sen se of humor and 
enjoyed a good joke. When she told of some funny incident that had 
happened to her or that she had heard, you could see a twinkle creep 
into her attractive eyes. She always smiled with her whole face and 
would squint her eyes when she laughed. 

It has truthfully been said that every Dixon daughter or daughter- 
in-law who got married in that era, was entertained with a shower or 
a party of some kind, by Aunt Alice. She always gave the bride-to 
be an electric iron or some useful, expensive gift. 

Being a true Dixon, it was natural for Aunt Alice to have Uncle 
Jabez build her a summer home at Wildwood, where several of her 
brothers and sisters had cabins. 

It was very difficult for her to spend all summer at Wildwood, due 
to being tied down at the Royden House for seven days a week and 
twenty-four hours a day; however she always managed to take her child- 



162 



ALICE SMITH DIXON DANGERFIELD 



ren and spend a few weeks each summer in the Canyon. A vacation for 
her in the Canyon, was not one of laying around, resting and doing 
nothing. She always had one of her relatives or friends come and 
enjoy the Canyon with her. This meant that she spent most of her 
time cooking and making her guest comfortable and happy. 

Like most of the other early cabins at Wildwood, it consisted of a 
wooden floor, with a half-way wood sides, a framework over the top 
to support a canvas tent, and a wooden doorway. At the front was an 
open porch with a screened cupboard and a wood burning range to cook 
on. Water for washing and cooking was carried from the near-by creek. 

As long as it did not rain, life in the Canyon was pleasant, relax- 
ing and exhilirating . But a sudden shower, chased all the family into 
the one room and brought out buckets and pans to catch the drips from 
the leaky canvas tent. With the coming of the sun the next day, the 
clothes, bedding and everything which had been soaked; dried out and 
life again moved into its pleasant, relaxing and satisfying routine. 

Aunt Alice was deeply interested, not only in her immediate fam- 
ily, but the whole Dixon Family. Whenever she had an inkling of trouble 
and distress, Aunt Alice was always there to be of assistance. 

It was the aim of Aunt Alice and Uncle Jabez to provide the best 
education available for their children. The three boys obtained their 
Doctor's Degree and Grace graduated from College with her degree. 
Aunt Alice's dream had been realized. She was very proud of the ach- 
ievements her family had made. 

She was very active in the Provo Third, Fourth and Fifth Wards. 
She taught in the Sunday School and the Relief Society for many years. 
She was a member of the Daughter of Pioneers, Camp #5 and also a 
member of the Alice Louise Reynolds Club. 

In her later years she suffered much, but patiently endured it all 
with a pleasant assurance that all would work out for the best. Thro- 
ughout her five years of sickness and ill health, Uncle Jabez stayed 
at her side, giving her his cheerful presence and ever thoughtfulne ss 
for her every need, and his patient hope for her well being. 

On December 7, 1948, Alice Smith Dixon Dangerfield passed away 
at her home in Provo, Utah. She had lived a good life, loving God 
and her fellowmen. 

As one of her neices remarked. "As children we were sure that 
in heaven there would be three people: George Washington, Abraham 
Lincoln, and Aunt Alice Dangerfield". 

To all adults who knew Aunt Alice Dangerfield, this same thought 
is applicable. 




FRONT - L to R - Jabez W. Dangerfield 

Grace, Alice D. Dangerfield. 
CENTER- Clifford D., Harold D. 
BACK - Roy den J. Dangerfield. 



SARAH DIXON MC CONACHIE 



1S71 - 1950 





Alexander Mc Conachie 



A Sketch of The Life of SARAH DIXON MC CONACHIE 



In writing this sketch of Mother's life, I may not have all the facts 
in chronological order. I would like to relate some of the incidents in 
her early life that made such a lasting impression upon her that she 
told them to me many times. Also, to relate some of the experiences 
she had and the things she did that developed her into the lovable per- 
son she was Nancy McConachie Armstrong 

According to an old family record, at exactly 22 minutes past nine 
o'clock, Thursday evening, December 7, 1 871 ;Sarah Anne Dixon made 
her entrance into the world. She was the second daughter born to the 
umion of Mary Smith and Henry Aldous Dixon. 

From the very beginning she was a delicate baby and her parents 
were careful to see that she did not overexert herself. As a child she 
was required to stay home from school a great deal. .Often when feel- 
ing ill, she would put her head under her desk and rub her cheeks, for 
fear the teacher would send her home if she looked pale. Having a 
great deal of native intelligence, she had a desire for learning, and 
being extremely sensitive person, her lack of early formal education 
was a source of worry to her. 

At the age of twelve a great tragedy came into her life in the 
death of her father. Her recollection of him was of a very generous, 
warmhearted and understanding individual. For comfort, she turned 
to taking almost constant care of her baby sister, Hattie, who had been 
born just previous to her father's death. 

A serious injury nearly ended her life when she was fourteen. 
She had not been able to learn to skate while younger, and she coaxed 
her brother to take her skating with them, on the Provo River. Not 
being experienced, she was easily overbalanced by a boy who bumped 
into her. She struck her head on the ice receiving a skull fracture. 
For seventeen weeks she was bedfast. Many times during those weeks, 
the family was afraid the end had come. 

As she slowly regained her health, she began to take a great in- 
terest in sewing and designing of clothes. Her sister Alice disliked 
sewing as much as Sarah disliked cooking, so a compact was made 
between them; Sarah would do Alice s's sewing and Alice would take 
Sarah's turn at the stove. Sarah became so adept that she began to 
sew for others outside the family. She made quite a career for her- 
self. Later she had a small dressmaking shop with others to assist 
her. At that time she was designing her own patterns. 

Sarah grew to be beautiful in appearance, charming in manner 
and very attractive to the young men of the community. She had many 
suitors and soon there was one for whom she felt affection. But upon 
discovering that he had bad habits she simply could not condone. She 
endeavored to break her engagement, but he persisted in his attentions, 



163 



164 



SARAH DIXON MC CONACHIE 



so with the permission of her family she went to Salt Lake to stay with 
some friends of her mother. These people, by the name of Abernathy, 
operated a small candy shop and factory. Sarah enjoyed waiting on 
customers and helping occasionally with making candy. While staying 
with them she obtained a position as cashier at the Royal Bakery. 

In order to reach her work each morning, she had to pass by the 
Vienna Cafe. In this Cafe, the headwaiter was a tall, handsome , blond 
Scotchman by the name of Alexander Mc Conachie. He noticed this 
lovely young lady pass by and soon found himself watching for her 
every morning. Then he discovered that his day was not complete un- 
less he had seen this vision of loveliness. She wore her shining black 
hair piled high upon a proudly held head, which turned neither to right 
nor left. He took notice of the trim little figure dressed in the latest 
fashions. He liked the way she held her skits at just the proper hei- 
ghth in one hand and the tilt of the dainty parasol she held in the other. 

One. morning as Sarah passed, another waiter was standing beside 
Mac looking out. Mac turned to him and asked, "Do you see that young 
lady with the black hair and polkadot dress? 11 The waiter nodded, "Well, 
that's the lady I'm going to marry. " The waiter looked puzzled. No 
doubt he thought it strange that the young lady of Mac's choice had not 
even glanced his way. 

"Does she know it?" the waiter asked. 

"No", Mac replied, "But she will as soon as I find some way to 
meet her. " 

One evening only a short time later, Mac's good friend, Gus Voge- 
ler and his fiancee came into the cafe for dinner and with them was 
his dream girl. It seemed the two girls were good friends. If Mac 
had only known! A proper introduction was made and Mac began his 
courtship immediately. 

In a few short months this sincere, straightforward, clean cut 
fellow had completely won Sarah's heart. But when she told her family 
she intended to marry him, she met with a great opposition. Very 
readily they recognized his worth, but he was not a member of the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Her mother felt she 
could not find happiness outside of her own faith. 

Sarah honored her mother and knew in her heart she could not be 
happy if she disobeyed the wishes of her family. She also knew there 
could never be anyone else for her but Mac and so at the ripe old age 
of about twenty- three years she resigned herself to the fate of being 
an old maid. She went back to Provo again to take up dressmaking. 

Sarah had always enjoyed people and parties and her family felt 
sure she would soon find someone else. But she practically withdrew 
from social life. Then too there was the determination and charm of 
the young Scotchman to reackon with. He continued to pay court . This 



SARAH DIXON MC CONACHIE 



165 



was not to easy in his day. It meant a day away from work, a long 
ride on the steam train, a long walk from the station - - - only a 
few hours time with Sarah before the steam train returned to Salt 
Lake . 

He often told in later years, the story of sending her some Ameri- 
can Beauty roses for Christmas, saying that when he arrived later on 
the train and was walking from the station, every other man he passed 
was wearing one of his roses in his Lapel. Sarah's version of the story 
was, that she had merely had a couple of Christmas Day callers and 
she thought it only polite to share her roses with them. Mac no doubt 
learned later that her generous nature made it impossible for her to 
enjoy anything she had unless she shared it with others. However, it 
happened, it was a standing joke in the family in later years. When- 
ever Mac brought her flowers, even from their own garden, he would 
say, "Mither, I don't want to catch half the men in town wearing these 
in their buttonholes". 

Sarah's resignation and Mac's determination finally wore away 
the family opposition and the marriage date was set. The following 
is an exact copy of the wedding invitation: 

"Mrs. Mary A. Dixon desires your presence at the wedding 
reception of he r daughter, Sarah, and Mr. A. C. McConachie 
at her residence, Cor. F and 9th Sts. , Provo City, Utah, Thurs- 
day evening October 7, 1897, at seven o'clock." 
Guests did not call for a few moments to visit and wish the bride 
well, in Sarah's day. Oh! no, they came for a full course chicken 
dinner and a full evening of visiting and entertainment. 

The bride was indeed radiant in her cream satin gown with leg 
o'mutton sleeves and pearl trimmed high collar yoke. The skirthad 
7 gores all heavily lined. Her slippers were also of satin with the 
latest toothpick toes and shaped heels. The gown was designed and 
made by Sarah and cherished for years to come. Many and many a 
time when the anniversary of this date was celebrated, Mac would say, 
"Mither, put on your wedding dress and let's see how you looked when 
you were a bride. " Always, he was proud that she had the same trim 
figure, the same sparkle in her eye. Only the hair kept changing and 
finally when she wore the dress for the last time, on their fortieth an- 
niversary, her hair was pure silver. 

After the wedding they journeyed to Salt Lake, where Mac had 
furnished a nice little home he had rented in Whitaker's Court on 3rd. 
South. 

With her emphasis having been on sewing and her dislike for cook- 
ing, Sarah had a lot to learn. Being in the restaurant business, Mac 
was in no danger of going hungry, but Sarah knew it was her duty to 
cook for him. No one had told her that in making lemon pie, the crust 



166 



SARAH DIXON MC CONACHIE 



is baked before being filled, consequently the pie crust raised, the 
oven received the filling and the house received some very unappetiz- 
ing odors, and just as Mac was to arrive home. She quickly hid the 
pie on the top shelf behind the pantry door and scraped out the oven. 
Mac wrinkled up his nose when he entered and wanted to know what 
the delicious aroma was. Then he went snooping and found the pie. 
He cut himself a huge piece of pie and sat down to devour it, declar- 
ing it the best he had ever tasted. But when the bride burst into tears, 
he knew he had carried the joke too far. She vowed she would make a 
pie he could truly say was the best if it took her a lifetime. She suc- 
ceeded without spending a lifetime at it, not only with pie but all kinds 
of cookery. She experimented with receipts until she became not only 
a good cook, but an unusual one. 

The only child born to this marriage was a beautiful, brown eyed 
baby boy, who arrived August 16, 18 98. He was christened Donald 
Collie. Sarah's health was greatly impaired by the birth of the child 
and she had to walk on crutches for several weeks. The baby was 
only a little over a year old when she had a major operation. 

Sarah felt they should be acquiring a home of their own, but Mac 
was sure they hadn't enough money. However Sarah kept watching 
the advertisements and went looking whenever she could. Finally she 
found a little home on 7th West that was within their means and entire- 
ly filled their needs as it provided Donald with a safe place to play. 
They were pleased and proud to be in their own home and thrilled with 
their wonderful boy. 

By this time Mac had been made manager of the Cafe and things 
were looking very prosperous. 

The greatest unhappiness this couple ever had to share together 
came to them on March 4, 1902, when their baby son was called home. 
He had contracted a severe case of Scarlet Fever and although every- 
thing known to medical science was done for him, it was to no avail. 
There are no words to describe the anguish of this young couple who 
knew they could never have another child. 

Several years of illness followed for Sarah. Another operation 
and trip to California for her health. She was never happy in the little 
home after Donald's death and had many times discussed selling it. 
One evening Mac brought home some splendid news. He was to have 
a long leave of absence from business and they would sell the home 
and, at long last, take the honeymoon trip he had always promised 
her. When they returned, they would start the building of their new 
home. The trip was to be a combination of pleasure and business. 
But what a pleasure it was, to attend to business which consisted of 
visiting the fine st re stau rants and hotel dining rooms in the east to 
make a study of their cuisine and methods of serving. 



SARAH DIXON MC CONACHIE 



167 



The home was readily disposed of at a good profit. This was in 
1907 and a World's Exposition was in progress at Jame stown, Virginia. 
They made their first major stop there and spent a good deal of time 
along the water front at various places in Virginia. They had days of 
sightseeing in Washington, New York and Chicago. Then they went up 
into Canada to the little town of We Hand, Ontario, where Mac had spent 
his boyhood from the age of five when he came from Scotland, until 
the age of seventeen when he ran away from his Uncle's home to go 
West and be a cowboy. They had a long visit at the Uncle's home, 
who by this time was an old man and being cared for by Mac ' s younge r 
sister Katherine. 

Sarah was fascinated with the Canadian people and their customs 
and Katherine so enjoyed her that she begged Sarah to stay on after 
it was time for Mac to return to work. Sarah stayed for several weeks 
and although she never again saw Katherine, after leaving Canada ; 
they corresponded with each other until Sarah's passing. 

Upon arrival in Salt Lake, Sarah found that Mac had a place for 
them to board, just one block from the site of their new home, which 
was to be built on the corner of Main and Apricot Streets. 

This was a happy year. Ginnie and Papa Wade, with whom they 
stayed, were jolly people and again Sarah made some life long friends. 
Although Papa Wade passed away many years ago, Ginnie, who is in 
her nineties and lives in California, kept in contact by letter or a vis- 
it whenever she came to Utah. 

By the following year the home was completed enough for them to 
move in. It was large and beautiful. Although it was a lot of work, 
Sarah enjoyed it and at that time she was able to have plenty of help. 

In January of 1910, word came that her cousin, Fanny Shearsmith, 
and her three little girls were coming from England, to make their 
home in Provo. Sarah's brother, Albert, had been on a mission there, 
a few years previous and with other missionaries had been instrument- 
al in converting Fanny and her husband to the Church. In the mean- 
time , Fanny had been left a widow, but still having the desire to come 
to Zion, she was encouraged and helped by Albert Dixon. He, of 
course, planned to meet her upon arrival in Salt Lake, but was called 
out of town on business. He asked his Sister Sarah to go to the Station. 
He forgot to bring her the picture of them, as he had promised, so her 
only means of identification was that both the mother and children had 
brown eyes. However she had no difficulty in recognizing them when 
three little girls all dressed alike in blue pleated kilts and green 
sweaters and caps stepped off the train. 

Sarah took them home and fell in love with all three children. In 
a day or so the little family left to settle in Provo. She and Mac had 
often talked of adopting a child and had encountered one sad experience 



168 



SARAH DIXON MC CONACHIE 



in trying to do so. They wanted so much to have one of Fanny's little 
girls and after several months, she consented to seven year old Nancy, 
her second child, go to live with them. They took Nancy permanently 
into their home and their hearts. 

The next few years were ones of accomplishment and fulfillment. 
Sarah had every opportunity to use her knowledge of design and sew- 
ing in making clothes for Nancy and Nancy's big family of dolls and 
later she made countless dance costumes. All the youngsters in the 
neighborhood knew they could always have a play dinner at Nancy's 
house. Or maybe a taffy pull with Mrs. Mac showing them how to 
make candy canes or twisted baskets. Hour upon hour of happy enjoy- 
ment went into the learning and teaching of Art work, for the 19th and 
Capitol Hill Ward Relief Society. Altogether , thirty years were spent 
as a visiting teacher. No Church banquet was complete without her 
artisitic touch to the table decorations. Through the years, innumer- 
able cakes and pies and other goodies came from her oven to grace 
the Church dinner table. 

She was active in a literary Club, organized by 1 2 of her friends 
and called "The Antiques". No member left the club and no new mem- 
bers were admitted. Since Sarah's death there are three remaining 
members. Days and days, during World War I were spent at Red 
Cross Headquarters making and inspecting bandages. There were 
crab- cracking parties for friends and neighbors at Christmas time. 
There were dinners for nephews who were leaving or returning from 
missions. Always a house full of company at Conference time. Dinners 
for nieces and nephews who came to be married in the Temple. A 
great deal of entertainment took place for family and friends and for 
Nancy's friends. 

A business adventure of Mac's turned out to be an unprofitable in- 
vestment and made finances in the home less plentiful. Sarah decided 
to help by renting rooms in the big home. She was such a gracious and 
hospitable landlady and made such good friends of several of those who 
stayed with her that they affectionately called her "Mother Mac" and 
remembered her on special occasions with cards and gifts until the 
end of her life . 

Finances went from bad to worse. It was necessary to vacate the 
building where the Old Vienna Cafe had stood as a landmark for many 
years. Mac invested as a partner in a new cafe opened by George 
Morgan. Almost before the new business could get firmly established, 
a disastrous fire made a complete loss of the place. The insurance 
was inadequate but with his share, Mac opened the Chesapeake Cafe 
on Second South. Before it could get well under way, the depression 
had come and it was impossible to make a financial success of it, and 
Mac lost the business. His health had begun to break under the strain. 



SARAH DIXON MC CONACHIE 



169 



He was able to work for others only a short time when it was discov- 
ered that he had cancer. He, who had always taken care of Sarah, was 
in need of help and she did a magnif icient job of taking care of him. 
She devoted about her entire time to nursing him. In June of 1937 he 
had an operation. This served only to agravate the condition and he 
suffered intensely. On January 16, 1938 he passed away. 

The fact that he had joined the Church just three months before 
his death, brought a measure of solace to Sarah. Due to his failing 
health, a special baptism had been arranged by his good friend Rufus 
K. Hardy. 

Swiftly on the heels of the tragedy of losing her husband came the 
loss of her home. One of the hardest things that Sarah ever had to do 
was to leave her home and friends in Salt Lake. Yet she knew she 
would be more contented back in Provo with her family than anywhere 
else . 

For a year she had an apartment in her brother Charles' home. 
However half of the year was spent in Denver, where her nephew, Dr. 
Clifford Dangerfield, had arranged for her to have a cataract removed 
from he r eye . 

The day before she was to leave for Denver she fell down the 
stairs in her sister Rye's home and broke her wrist. So the entire 
winter was spent in Denver, convalescing from both ailments. Most 
of the time she stayed with the Dangerfields but enjoyed many pleasant 
days with the El Roy Nelson family. 

Upon her return to Provo there was an apartment vacant in her 
mother's old home and she moved into it. She was back where she 
had spent so much of her early life. She enjoyed being with old friends, 
and working in the Relief Society and Widow's Organization of the 3rd. 
Ward, and in the Daughters of Pioneers, with her sister Rye. But 
most of all she found happiness in the "Sisters Club". The Sisters and 
Sister-in-laws of the Dixon Family held a birthday party for Sarah, 
the first birthday she celebrated after her return from Denver. Out 
of this enjoyable afternoon grew the organization that has brought much 
joy into the lives of the "Sisters", and a great strengthening of ties in 
the Dixon Family. 

Then came World War II. By this time Nancy was married and 
living in the little town of Lindon. When her husband had to go into 
the Army, Nancy persuaded her mother to come and live with her. 

So once more, Sarah made new friends. Her capacity for friend- 
ship was limitless and it wasn't long before neighbors and members 
of the Ward were calling her"Aunt Sarah". Here, also, she found many 
ways of giving service; in the home, in the Relief Society, and "baby 
sitting" for the young coupel next door so they could have some free 
evenings together. 



170 



SARAH DIXON MC CONACHIE 



Her sister Alice had a long seige of illness prior to her death and 
Sarah spent a great deal of time with her trying to comfort and help 
whenever she could. 

During her sister Rye's last illness she stayed a short time with 
her. The loss of these two sisters and her two brothers, Albert and 
Parley, all within a very short space of time, overwhelmed her with 
a great sense of loneliness. 

One delighful experience came to her in the last year of her life. 
In order to raise money for the Church Building Fund of the Lindon 
Ward, each organization chose a queen and sold votes for its candidate. 
Sarah was chosen to represent the Relief Society. The climax to the 
campaign came at the dance where the boxes of money were opened. 
Sarah won by a large majority and was crowned Queen of the Ball. She 
made a very gracious, lovely queen, dressed in a Pioneer costume 
borrowed from a friend, Wilmuth Brown. The costume had been made 
by Sarah some fifty- five years previous for Wilmith's mother. 

For a period of about five years she suffered with high blood pres- 
sure. Her constant fear was that she would have a long period of in- 
activity before her death. She prayed that when her time came to be 
called home that she could go quickly. Surely her prayer was an- 
swered to the fullest. On Christmas Morning, 1950, as she was dress- 
ing to go into Provo, she had a cerebral hemmorage and lost all con- 
sciousness immediately. She passed away quietly early the following 
morning (December 26, 1950). It could be truly said, "She did not 
taste death". 

On December 29, 1950, she was laid to rest between her beloved 
husband and son. 

In conclusion, the following is a short excerpt from one of her fa- 
vorite poems: 

"There is no death! the stars go down 

To rise upon some other shore 
And bright in heaven's jeweled crown 

They shine forever more. 

And ever near us, though unseen 

The dear immortal spirits tread; 
For all the boundless universe 

Is life - - - there are no dead." 




BA.CK : Fanny Shearsmith. 

Middle L to R: Mary & Doris 
Shearsmith and 
Sarah D. Mc Conachie. 

Front: Nancy Mc Conachie 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 

January 5 , 1872 
To 

February 17, 1947 



Aunt Rye 



A MOTHERS DAY TRIBUTE 



On the front page of section two of the Provo Sunday Herald 
of May 11, 1941, appeared a large picture of MARIA LOUISE DIXON 
TAYLOR with the following tribute: 

"Typical of the mothers who are being honored to day is Mrs. 
MARIA DIXON TAYLOR, mother of eight sons and daughters, who 
has found time along with her many home duties to busy herself with 
church activities and interesting worthwhile hobbies. 

Always actively engaged in various church and auxilliary assign- 
ments, Mrs. Taylor has of late years devoted herself to genealogical 
work, writing family records and arranging pictorial albums. 

Her seven living sons and daughters include ARTHUR D. , LYNN, 
HENRY D. , and CLARENCE TAYLOR, and Miss RUTH TAYLOR of 
Provo; ELTON L. TAYLOR of Price , and Mrs. ALICE T. NELSON 
of Denver. She has fifteen grandchildren, and is proud of the fact 
that she had six sons in the mission field. " 

Her youngest son ORSON KENNETH TAYLOR died in 1940. 



172 



Autobiography of MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



On January 5, 1872 in Provo, Utah, I made my entrance into this 
world at five minutes past nine o'clock p.m. I weighed ten and one 
half pounds. On January 13, 1872 I was christened by my father. 

My parents were Henry Aldous Dixon and Sarah DeGrey Dixon. 
I was the only girl in a family of nine children. There were eight 
brothers: John DeGrey, Arthur D. .Ernest, Charles Owen, Walter D. , 
LeRoy, Arnold, and Henry Alfred who was born November 14, 1865 
and died in Salt Lake City, Utah on July 1, 1867. 

When I was about eight years of age my father was called on a 
Mission to Great Britain. My Aunt Mary, who was Father's plural 
wife, together with her children, my brothers and sisters; moved to 
our home. It was surely a little house well filled. At one time there 
were eight of us down with measles. I took cold and they went in on 
me. I was surely sick. They said I had black measles. My life was 
almost dispared of but through the faith of my good Mother, I was re- 
stored again to health. 

While my Father was away, my brother Arthur had diptheria. 
None of the rest of us contracted it from him., although we were in 
the same small house. Doctors were almost unknown in our home. 
People at that time seemed to exercise more faith in a Higher Power 
for healing, than the skill of the Doctor. 

Our home was one of the best in religious environment. Father 
and Mother both were very religious, and their greatest desire was to 
see their children keep the commandments of God. 

We had our family prayers morning and evening, and we kept the 
Word of Wisdom strictly. I never remember seeing tea, coffee, tob- 
acco or liquor in any form in our home. 

Rigid economy had to be practiced in the home to make ends meet. 
We had good wholesome food, which gave us good strong bodies. 

My education started in the old Round House. It was two stories 
tall and built of adobe. It stood on the lot near Lester Taylor's house 
(corner of 4th West and 1st North). I think Mrs. Oakley was the tea- 
che r . 

My second school was to the West School, located a block south of 
the Southeast corner of what is now Pioneer Park, on Fifth West and 
Second South. My teachers here were Laura Larsen, later Mrs. Oran 
Lewis of Spanish Fork, and her sister Annie, later Mrs. Gillispie, 
librarian at the B. Y. U. for many years, who just recently died at 
the age of eighty years of age. 

My next teacher at the West School was L. A. Wilson, followed 
by George H. Brimhall, who later became President of the Brigham 

Young University. 

A new building was erected in the East part of town, on the corn- 
er of First East and Second North. Before the building was completed 



173 



174 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



one large room on the north ground floor was finished and we went 
from the West School, with our teacher, George H. Brimhall, to 
what was later called the Parker School. This ended my schooling 
for some time . 

Later, for two terms, I attended the B. Y. Academy, which had 
temporary quarters in the Z, C. M. I. Wholesale House on South Univer- 
sity Avenue, because their building, the Lewis Hall, had burned down. 
When this Z.C. M.I. building was erected my father was working at the 
Z.C.M. I. in Salt Lake City, and in 1883 they sent him to Provo to 
become Manager for this new branch of the business. 

In the days of my youth we had to make our own amusements. As 
I look back and compare them with the amusements of today, I think 
we enjoyed them more because we had to put forth an effort to make 
them worthwhile; the more we put into a cause the more we get out of 
it. 

We had no picture shows, where we were entertained with little 
effort on our part. We had what we called an exhibition in which small 
children sang or recited. I remember when I was a very small child, 
one of these exhibitions was put on in Cluff's Hall on Second North and 
Second East Street. This place was where the Fourth Ward held their 
meetings and general assemblies before they built their present meet- 
ing house. At that time we were living in the Fourth Ward, which ex- 
tended to Third West. Later the tier between Third and Second West 
was put into the Third Ward. Now it is in the Fourth Ward again. The 
upper story, at Cluff Hall, was used by the Church, the lower floor of 
the building was used for the making of furniture by the Cluff Brothers. 
This furniture was sold by George Taylor, who became my father-in- 
law, and owner of what is now Taylor Brothers Company. 

My sister Sarah, just one month older than I, enjoyed each others 
company almost like twins. We dressed alike and were inseparable 
until we were twelve years of age. 

On one occasion Sarah and I were asked to speak little pieces. 
The only way they got us to consent to do this was to let us go on the 
stage together. We went holding each others hand. I said mine first. 
It is about the only thing I remember along that line. I think I will 
write it if I can recall it: 

"Come and see me Mary Ann this afternoon at three, 
Come as early as you can and stay till after tea, 

We'll jump the rope and dress the doll, 
And feed my sisters birds, 

And read a little story book all full of easy words. 11 



Then Sarah took courage and began hers. As she was sort of 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



175 



tongue-tied at the time and couldn't pronounce her words plain, it 
caused a lot of laughter. If I can remember some of it I will give it 
he re: 

" I want a piece of calico to make my doll a dress, 
I doesn't want a big piece, a yard will do I guess 
( and etc. and etc. have forgotten the rest)." 

That was my first introduction to performing before the public. As 
time went on I took several parts in Sunday School entertainments and 
later M. I. A. We had a lot of fun rehearsing for them, but the audience 
had more, for they were real side splitting scenes. Many were intend- 
ed to be real tragedies, such as Shake spear's "Hamlet". Some were 
blood curdling scenes such as "Down Black Canyon", with real villians. 

Prof. Henry E. Giles put on "Pinafore", a musical comedy. This 
was staged in the Opera House on First North and First West. This 
building is now used for the Armory. The first performance went 
over big. The cast agreed to tour some of the northern towns of Utah 
County; Pleasant Grove, American Fork and Lehi. Most of the cast 
went in lumber wagons, perched upon high spring seats. My brother, 
John, drove some of we girls over in a two seated surrey or buggy. I 
took part as one of the cousins in the chorus. When we were ready 
for the first performance, one of our main actors did not show up. 
After searching for some time he was discovered in a saloon with a 
black eye. As he took the part of Dead Eye Dick, it was quite becom- 
ing to him. 

Before arriving at Lehi some of the drivers bantered each other 
for a race, the results were that some of the leading singers had to 
appear before the audience with bandages on their heads. 

We had a lot of sport after it was all over. One of our favorite 
recreations was dancing. Most of the dances were held in the meet- 
ing houses. The benches were either piled in one corner of the room 
or taken out. Some were left arranged around the room for seats 
when the dancers were tired and also for the spectators. There were 
many spectators, especially the older ladies who wanted to know what 
new love matches were being made. And believe me they knew it all, 
nothing escaped their notice. 

The young married folks took their babies, it they had no one to 
leave them home with. After nursing them they were put in their bug- 
gies or laid on a pillow on a bench in the back room. 

There were very few round dances. The Church at one time ask- 
ed the people not to dance them, but they gradually came back again. 
The square dances, such as the plain quadrille, scotch reel or poly- 
gamy dance, as some called it, where each man had two women part- 
ners, were enjoyed by young and old. There were no wall flowers 



176 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



during the square dances. The lancers was a very pretty dance, as 
was the waltz quadrille. 

Surprise parties were very popular. The young married people 
joined with the older ones. My Mother and Mother-in-law often accom- 
panied us and our babies. What good times we had, although some of 
the men did not enjoy them. My husband never did like them. He did 
love dancing though, and was a very graceful and good dancer. 

In the summer time, for a few years, a dance floor was laid amo- 
ngst the big cottonwood trees in Tanner's Park. This Park was across 
the street from the old adobe yard which was the second fort of our 
first Pioneers, who came to Provo, It is now called Sowiette Park. 
It was grand to dance there by moon light to sweet strains of music. 
Tanner's Park holds sweet memories to hundreds of people who used 
to attend our Ward Reunions there. It was great sport to go swimm- 
ing in the stream running through the Park. The girls had a swimm- 
ing hole there. I never heard of a boy's swimming hole in the Park. 

There were large swings in the Park and we girls enjoyed going 
there with our boy friends. They used to swing us so high we nearly 
touched the branches of tall trees. A boy stood on each side of the 
swing ahold of each end of a rope; by putting the rope across our waist 
we were pushed ever so much higher. 

In the summer time we looked forward to the Fourth of July and 
Twenty- fourth of July. After a day or two of cooking and packing we 
were all very excited about going to the canyon. As soon as it was day- 
light, not later than four o'clock, we climbed into a wagon. Most of 
the wagons had a white canvas stretched over the bows and supports 
to shelter you from the sun and rain. It took hours to get into the 
canyon then, where it only takes minutes now. 

My children make quite a joke of it now. If we are going on a trip 
they say we must start at daybreak or Mother won't thinks she is going 
on an outing. 

Our Ward Outings were looked forward too. Some times we went 
over to Nelson's Park on the hill above Lake View. This place had 
beautiful trees and arbors with climbing roses and vines, large fields 
for ball games, swings and merry-go-round. Some times we went to 
the Old Lake Resort at Utah Lake, where we enjoyed bathing, boating 
and dancing. A street railway ran from town through the swamps and 
marshes to the resort. Mr. William Probe rt was owner of it. It did 
not last iong, as he lost a great deal of money on it. My bathing suit 
was very different from those the girls wear today. There was an under 
garment of black sateen with elastic in the bottom which held it tight 
around the knee. The outer garment was made of black alapaca or 
mohair, with nig*, neck, sleeves to the elbow, a belt joining the waist 
anc .^.rt which came below the knee. We always wore black cotton 
stockings that reached above the knee. In case we forgot our stockings, 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



177 



it was just too bad for us, as we didn't dare to go in with bare legs. 

Our winter sports consisted of skating and sleigh riding. As soon 
as the ditches froze over, we who had no skates or didn't know how to 
skate, enjoyed sliding on the ice. 

Most children had home-made sleds. They were rather crude, 
but answered the same purpose as the very fine ones my children and 
grandchildren have now. 

Bob-sleighing was the most fun for all. A wagon box was put on 
runners, nice, clean straw was put in the bottom with hot rocks and 
bricks and plenty of quilts to keep one warm. It didn't matter how cold 
the weather was. A good team with plenty of sleigh bells, put us in 
the spirit for a good time. We generally ended by all joining in sing- 
ing songs. 

I had a very happy girlhood. My sister Sarah and I being so near 
the same age, have always been very much attached to each other. I 
have always admired and loved my sister Alice. She, being older 
than Sarah and I, never cared for dolls and to playhouse with us. 
She would rather play with my brother, Arthur, who was nearer her 
own age . 

My greatest ambition was to marry a clean, honest, Latter-Day 
Saint man and have a fine, happy family. I am happy to say that am- 
bition has been realized just as I wished it to be. 

My Father died when I was twelve years of age, on the Fourth of 
May 1884, not long after his return from the Mission Field. He left 
two wives and thirteen children. My Mother's family as follows: 
John DeGrey, Arthur D. , Ernest, Charles Owen, Walter D. , LeRoy 
and myself. ( Arnold was born three weeks after Father's death). 
Aunt Mary's family as follows: Alice, Sarah Ann, William Aldous, 
Albert F. , Parley S. , Harriett Amelia (Hattie). 

My Mother was only thirty- nine years of age when Father died. 
We were not in poverty, but it was a struggle to make ends meet. 
Mother wished me to have every advantage, being her only girl, but 
I felt I had younger brothers who needed more education than I. If I 
could find something to do I could help my brothers. My brother John 
procurred a job for me in the Provo Book and Stationary Co. , where 
I worked for some time under Robert Skelton. George S. Taylor be- 
ing a stockholder came in and Mr. Skelton was released. 

In a short time Mr. Skelton went in business for himself, and I 
went to work for him until I was married to Arthur N. Taylor on the 
9th of May 18 94, in the Salt Lake Temple by Pres. John R. Winder, 
counsellor to President Joseph F. Smith. 

Our mode of transportation in those days was much slower than 
now. We left home on Tuesday morning on the Union Pacific steam 
line train, in order to be in the Temple on Wednesday morning. We 



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MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



went in the Temple at eight o'clock in the morning, getting out late in 
the afternoon. There was only one session a day then. Now there are 
about seven. 

Then we had to wait until Thursday to get home again. There was 
only one train a day. Now you can make the round trip in just a few 
hours . 

Before this time my brothers built my Mother a nice home, at 
270 North 5th West. It is now owned by my eldest son, Arthur D. and 
family. We did enjoy our new home with its large spacious rooms, 
after having been so crowded in our little home. 

My brother, John, worked as book and time keeper for Samuel 
Liddiard. He also was bookkeeper for Smoot Lumber Co. 

Arthur and Ernest worked as water carriers for Samuel Liddiard, 
and finally they learned the mason trade from him. The did the brick- 
work for Mother's home. John traded one of our teams to Tom Patten, 
for his services to do the carpenter work, on the house. Mother took 
boarders to help get money to pay for the materials. Her farm furnish- 
ed produce for the table. By planning and hard work, our home was built. 

After our return from Salt Lake, in preperation for our wedding 
reception, all the beds and furniture that could be spared, were moved 
out of our house to make room for guests. One hundred and forty - 
eight guests and relatives sat down to a real banquet. 

Our first home was on First North between Second and Third West, 
just north of Taylor Bros. Co. Store, where my husband worked. We 
lived in this little home and were very happy. I used to say it was 
like playing house, when only two of us sat at the table, after being 
used to such a large family at home. 

Some time later we moved into my Mother's old home. We had 
it renovated and cleaned throughout. It was very comfortable. In 
this home our first child, Arthur D. was born on the 4th day of October 
1895. A year later we moved into our own home, which was built on 
part of my Mother's lot. She was very anxious to have me near her. 
As we had little money, we built two rooms first; then we added other 
rooms as we were able to pay for them. Although not the most modern 
with all conveniences, still it holds many fond memories for me. Our 
children, all but one, were born there: Lynn D. was born on the 6th 
of May 1898, Elton LeRoy on 22nd of June 1900, Henry D. on the 22nd 
of November 1903, Alice L. on the 18th of November 1906, Clarence 
D. on the 11th of May 1909, Orson Kenneth on the 3rd of November 
1913, and Ruth Elaine on the 20th of March 1917. 

My husband's parents were pioneers who crossed the plains and 
endured the hardships of the early pioneers. They had barely enough 
money to pay for their passage. The burried two children before rea- 
ching the Valley. 

Eliza Nicholls Taylor suffered many trials that would ordinarily 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



179 



have crushed a much stronger woman. She was physically weak but 
spiritually strong. She trusted in her Heavenly Father and came thr- 
ough victorious. I have never seen a person with such strong faith. 
I remember on one occasion we were all camped at South Fork, Provo 
Canyon. A terrible flood came down, and the creek near our tents was 
in danger of overflowing and washing us out. The women gathered 
their children ready to rush to the near by mountains. Grandma Taylor 
said, "Girls, where is your faith? Did you say your prayers and ask 
your Heavenly Fathers protection? If you did, cover up your heads and 
be quiet. " She told her son, Tom, to go to the River bank and watch. 
She would pray. That had the desired effect and all was well. 

My Mother and she were very dear friends and loved each other 
very much. For about sixteen years they looked forward to several 
weeks visit with us at our summer home in "Wildwood" , Provo Canyon. 
It was a joy to us all to have them with us. It meant so much to our 
children partaking of their sweet uplifting influences. My husband 
purchased two easy wicker rocking chairs.., just alike , and placed them 
on the front porch of our cabin and they sat in "State", as it were, to 
receive homage from all the campers as well as guest who came to 
our resort. For they were both loved by everyone. The chairs are 
still placed on the porch when we are there, but the two noble women 
who occupied them have passed on to a great reward which they so 
richly deserve. 

Some time after our marriage, my husband was called to preside 
over the Y. M. M. I. A. in the Third Ward. He held this position for 
seven years. Then he was called into the Mission Field. At times, 
after the babies came along, and tusseling with them all day (for 
they were cross due to colic) I felt at night, how soothing it would be 
to have my husband sit by my side and tell me things that would take 
my mind from such a strenious day. But alas! my hopes were gone, 
when he came in and said, "Mother, will you please hurry with supper 
while I wash and prepare to go out". I knew it was not Mutual night, 
but he said, "You see it is Mutual League to night". I said, "but why 
do you have to go? You have spent months of time and a lot of money 
(for I know) getting the hall and equipment ready. Can't they get along 
without you? " He would look at me in a wistful way ( for he loved his 
home and family) and say, "You know I would love to stay with you, 
but we have just got to make a success of this physical education pro- 
gram. If we get the boys interested there, we can get them interested 
in our Mutual Meetings. You know, Mother, if I say come on boys 
let's go, it will have more weight with them than if I say go on boys 
and have a good time. " 

As usual I could see his point of view. I let my mind run back a 
few months to the times when the boys were not coming out to their 



180 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



meetings as they should. They were seeking amusements and other 
things which were not of the best environment. The Officers talked it 
over. They thought instead of trying to preach them to Church, it would 
be better to lead them in a different way. They rented the Ho r ton 
Building (where the Superior Motor Co. stands)(corner of CenterStreet 
and Fifth West. They took out the partitions and made a large room up- 
stairs for a gym. The next thing was to find money for the equipment. 
My husband and William P. Silver took the delivery wagon and a span 
of mules from Taylor Brothers Company, and went to Salt Lake City 
to a second hand store where they paid three hundred dollars, cash, 
for the apparatus. I know how hard they had worked and I concluded 
I would make it just as easy as possible for him even if it did mean 
three nights a week being without his company. 

One thing we women did do. We got together and said the women 
need a little relaxation as well as the men. We made us gym suits. 
Mine was of wine colored flannel from the Woolen Mills, with a 
black water wabe ribbon sash, a bow tied at the back. We hired Miss 
Mame Gates, the gym teacher at the Academy, to teach us. One night 
a week was hubbys turn to stay at home and take care of the children. 
What fun we did have. First swinging the dumbells and Indian clubs, 
then on the giants ride, last but not least going over the vaulting pony 
(or trying to) then through the exercises. Some of the older ladies, 
when they were on the floor flat on their back and told to get up with- 
out touching their hands, found difficulty in doing it which caused a 
lot of fun. It made the women more contended to stay at home three 
nights a week if they had one night out. 

Before our marriage, my husband purchased some stock in Taylor 
Bros. Co. where he was working. 

October 20, 1900 my husband left for a mission to Great Britain. 
We had just completed our home and furnished it. We had 3 boys, the 
youngest, Elton being three months old. I wanted to take boarders or 
do something to help pay his expenses. He would not consent to this. 
He, with my Mother and brothers worked out a plan unknown to me. 
The furniture in the house should be sold and the house rented. Then 
he was sure I could not do something that would undermine my health. 
He felt my children were enough to care for. My Mother and brothers 
were very happy for the opportunity of having me and my children, who 
they adored, come home and live with them. 

I shall never forget how I felt when I was packing the things and 
breaking up our home, which we had struggled so hard to build and 
furnish. It was like parting with old friends. Now I can see it was 
the only thing for us to do. We rented the house to Doctor Slater. 

My baby, Elton, cried so much with colic it nearly wore me out. 
The strange thing about it was the more he cried the fatter he became. 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



181 



When he was four months old he weighed twenty-two pounds. I became 
so nervous and was in such a run down condition, I had nervous head - 
aches which kept me down a great deal of the time. 

The first month my husband was in the mission field I sent him 
ten dollars. When Grandma Taylor found out, she was hurt and said, 
"Please don't send any more, don't you see he will get his blessing 
for leaving his work and his family? You will get yours for sacrific- 
ing his company so willingly and doing for the children out of your 
limited means. Please let me finance him so that I may share the 
blessings with both of you". She won. I never sent any more money. 
She certainly was blessed as he was appointed President of the 
Birmingham Conference in the city where she and her husband lived 
and left from, when they decided to join the Saints in the Rocky Moun- 
tains. Now their son could carry the same message that a good Elder 
had brought her, back to her native land. 

My husband enjoyed his work so much. He loved the Country and 
the people, and was so anxious to have me come to England and enjoy 
the sights with him, which at that time seemed an impossibility to me. 
By him urging from that side, and my folks on this, I finally consent- 
ed. My Mother came to my rescue, telling me she thought she had 
enough experience in caring for children, to be capable of caring for 
mine in my absence. Grandmother Taylor borrowed the money and 
my brother-in-law, T. N. Taylor, secured a pass for my railway fare 
to Chicago and return, which was a great help. 

I left Provo August 4, 1902 for Salt Lake City. There I met Mrs. 
Wm. Smith, whose husband was laboring in Birmingham, England 
with my husband. 

My brother Albert, was called on a mission to Great Britain, and 
accompanied us. At Ogden, Utah, Walter Parry, another missionary 
joined us, making a party of fourteen. 

The first night out I was very ill. I don't know if the cause was 
due to eating such a hearty lunch we had prepared, or sleeping in an 
upper berth. The next morning I was feeling fine and enjoyed the trip, 
going through the sage brush country of Wyoming and the corn fields 
of Nebraska. We spent two days in Boston, including a trip to the 
Emerson Piano Co. where we met Mr. Edward Payson, manager of 
the Piano Co. Albert and I presented letters of introduction given us 
by T.N. Mr. Payson treated us very kindly. Although he was a very 
busy man, he closed his desk and told the office force he would be out 
for the day. We left our Hotel at 9:00 a.m. and returned to our Hotel 
at 7:00 p.m. After visiting many points of interest in the older part 
of Boston; Kopp Cemetery, one of the oldest cemeteries and occupied 
by Italians. We had dinner in one of the Italian restaurants, and spent 
sometime at the different beach resorts. 



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MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



The second day we sailed on the Commonwealth, one of the larg- 
est boats afloat at that time. Our voyage was perfect as far as the 
weather was concerned. A traveling salesman told me it was his 
thirty-fourth trip and the best trip of all. There was hardly a wave. 

We saw two whale spouting water in the air, a short distance from 
us, and schools of porpoise. We experienced a great thrill as we ap- 
proached the Irish Coast. It surely did look good to see land again. 
When we arrived at Liverpool, England, my husband and Elder Smith 
were at the docks to meet us. I was very happy to meet Art, but sad 
to part with Albert. He was assigned to labor in the Grimsby Confer- 
ence. Hull was Albert's Headquarters, the birthplace of his Mother. 

We arrived in Birmingham about 10. 00 p.m. Rode about three 
miles from the station, on top of the bus or tram where we could 
look into the pubs or saloons and see women in there drinking. Many 
were drunk, holding babies in their arms. When we reached the Con- 
ference House at 230 Albert Road, the Elders were all up and waiting 
to see what the President's wife looked like. They invited us in for 
supper, I told them we had our lunch in Liverpool. They laughed and 
said you must eat five or six meals a day. I told them I was sure I 
never could do that, but it was only a short time until I ate every time 
I had a chance, and was still hungry. All I wanted to do was eat and 
sleep. The results was seventeen pounds gained in two months. 

My first Christmas away from home was spent in England, the 
birthplace of my Mother. When I came down the stairs, the mantel 
above the fireplace was decorated with all kinds of things, mainly 
lovely presents for Sister Smith and me from the Elders. Among the 
gifts was a small pig from Elder Spokes. It had a little verse stating 
it was just a reminder that when he visited at my home I was to serve 
him a sucking pig, for he was a true Englishman. I never had that 
privilege. He died in Salt Lake City shortly after his return home. 

Art arose earlier than I and there was a beautiful black, silk dress 
on my bed. He told me to get up and try it on, if it fit I could have it 
for a Christmas present. I found out he had the same dressmaker 
make it for me that I had engaged to make me another dress; there- 
fore she had my measurements. 

We had dinner at Art's Uncle Ebb and Aunt Harriet Hands, where 
we were treated very kindly. 

My first disappointment came at Conference time when I expected 
my husband would be released. President Francis M. Lyman was 
there and said that President Taylor could not be spared at that time. 
It would be six months mo re. I felt very badly and told Pres. Lyman 
I thought he was a very hard hearted man. It meant I would have to 
go home without my husband, as I had left three children at home. He 
said very quietly, "Very well. Pres. Taylor can spend ten days in 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



183 



London with you". 

I was arranging with Elders Lund and Brough, of Nephi, and 
others to accompany them home, when I received a letter from Mother 
saying in case Art did not get his release, I was to stay as the child- 
ren were well and she was getting along fine. I stayed seven months 
and shall always feel grateful to my Mother for the extra time I stay- 
ed. It was the most enjoyable time of all. I was more acquainted and 
better able to find my way around. Sister Smith and I were always 
spotted as Americans; especially when I handed a clerk three five dol- 
lar gold pieces or three pounds English money, for a twelve shilling 
purchase ($2. 50) . 

Art used to write about how wonderful the pantomines were, but 
I never expected to see them. In Birmingham I saw "Jack and the 
Beanstalk", and thought it the most wonderful thing I had ever seen, 
but when I was in London and saw "Mother Goose or the Goose that 
Layed the Golden Egg", I felt that I had been transformed into another 
world. The beautiful girls who flew from the stage out over the pit 
(the area where we were sitting) and dropped flowers was spectacular. 
There was about one thousand people on the stage for the finale. This 
was at the old Drury Lane Theatre, a very old and noted place. I also 
saw "Puss in Boots" at the Hippodrome Theatre in London, and many 
very wonderful stage plays. 

The Tower of London was a very interesting place. I was thrilled 
to see the beautiful jewels and crowns of the Kings and Queens, set 
with such precious stones. We went into the different towers where 
so many notable people and royalty had been imprisoned. Some had 
even traced their coat of arms on the stones with their own blood. 
We stood on the spot where the guillotine stood that beheaded Ann 
Bolyn, the wife of Henry VIII. A brass plate marks the spot. The 
moat that encircles the tower, was a drilling grounds for the different 
regiments of soldiers. We enjoyed watching the drills. 

Our trip to Westminister Abbey was most interesting. It gives 
you a rather queer sensation to stand in these high places, with stone 
monuments on each side representing royalty or some famous person, 
who was buried underneath the building, many under the stone floor. 
St. Paul's Cathedral was wonderful too. 

I can't begin to tell all the wonderful things I saw, but Madam 
Truasades' Wax Works was so outstanding to me. I could hardly be- 
lieve that the wax figures were not real living people, much to the 
amusement of my husband who stood a short distance away watching 
me. The British Museum was full of so many interesting things, a 
person could spend weeks there and then not see them all. I said I had 
seen more in that ten days, than about all my life before. 

When we returned to the Conference House, the Elders wanted to 



184 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



know if I was ill. I was so thin and looked so haggard, but we had 
such a short time to see so much. 

I always loved to read about the old Castles in England and what 
a thrill I got when I was able to go through some of them. Art took 
me to Warwick Castle, Lord and Lady Warwick resided there. When 
they were in London the flag was hoisted on the Castle and the public 
was allowed to go through. The grounds were very beautiful too. I 
decided I would not like to live in these rooms, they were so large and 
bare. I think I enjoyed the Maxtoke Castle more than any. The public 
was not allowed in there; but one of our friends, Charles Wells, who 
was Station Master and a friend of the caretaker, got permission for 
us to go through. It was built in 1385 and in a perfect state of preser- 
vation. It was the only Castle I saw with the original moat filled with 
water and covered with water lilies all out in bloom. 

Art and I spent a very happy day at Dudley Castle. The ruins are 
still standing on a hill above the city. As I stood there, I fancied I 
could see my Mother playing on the Castle green, as it was called, 
with her sister and other children, when she was a child. Dudley was 
her birthplace and she lived there until she left for America when ab- 
out eleven years of age. 

We visited many places of interest and I enjoyed everything so 
much, but sometimes my heart was very heavy when I thought of being 
separated from my children. 

In February 1903, my husband received his release to return home 
on the ship "Canada" which sailed on the 19th of February. I was so 
happy I felt I was walking on air. Art did not feel that way. He said 
there were so many things he wanted to accomplish that he had start- 
ed. It was some job packing and getting ready to leave. Most of the 
Elders came in and many parties were given for us and Bro. and Sis. 
Smith ( the lady I went over with). We all shed tears at the station, 
where so many friends came to see us off. We had learned to love 
those people and we knew it would be the last time we would see many 
of them; others we expected to meet in Utah. When we arrived in 
Liverpool, we found the ocean very rough and we had to go out to the 
ship in a tender. Pres. Lyman bid us goodbye at the office, but be- 
fore the vessel sailed he with others came out and onto the ship. He 
said we would have a very rough voyage, but we would land in safety. 
The time came when we were very thankful to Pres. Lyman for those 
words. We did have seven days of storm and nearly all the passengers 
were sick. The Captain, mate and nearly all the crew were also sick. 
Art went down to bed at Queenstown, Ireland and was never back on 
deck until we reached Halifax, Canada, one beautiful Sunday morning. 
It was quite a sight to see this harbour surrounded by huge cannons to 
guard against enemies coming in. About half of our passengers got 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



185 



off the boat at this place. From there we sailed down to Boston, glad 
to be on land again after many exciting experiences. 

We went to the Emerson Piano Factory to visit Mr. Payson. He 
was very kind to us and introduced us to Mr. Powers, President of 
the Company, and many of the official staff. He went to the station to 
see us off. We arrived in Chicago about 11:00 p.m. Now we had to 
be separated. Art took a taxi and we drove across the City. He put 
me on the Union Pacific, as my pass was on that line, and he came 
home on the D. & R. G. Railway, which was the line the Church chose 
at that time. I arrived in Salt Lake and went to the National Bank, 
where my brother John had his office. We went to his home and when 
I met Sarah we both wept. I was so glad to see her. John said that 
was a funny way of showing our joy. At that time there was only one 
train a day to Provo. I had to wait until evening, when my brother, 
Charles, who was working in Salt Lake , accompanied me home. When 
we reached Provo, Mother was there with my husband and children. 
When I rushed to take Elton, my baby in arms, he screamed and said, 
"Go away I want my mamma. She has gone on that train". That nearly 
broke my heart. After being away for seven months, my baby had 
forgotten me. The strange part of it was when I left he could only 
say a few words and now he talked so plain. In a short time he came 
to me and said, "You are my mamma". After looking at me he remem- 
bered me again. 

After nearly three years of separation, it was grand to be home 
again with our family. We only furnished three rooms, as we shared 
two rooms of our home with Bro. and Sis. Salt. They came to Provo 
from Salt Lake and could not find a home to live in, so they lived with 
us for one year until they went back to England. After they left, we 
began to furnish our home again. 

As our family was increasing, for we had four boys now, Henry 
being born November 22, 1903; we decided we had a problem on our 
hands of finding employment for them during vacation time, to keep 
them from running the streets. 

My husband and my brother, Arthur, bought a farm in Grandview 
from Ed. Loose. Five acres was in grapes, not being a very good 
variety, these were taken out and in their place was planted eight hun- 
dred Bartlet pears and a large peach orchard. 

During the summer the farmhouse was cleaned and made comfort- 
able for us to live in. I enjoyed living out there. We had a beautiful 
view of the valley and lake below us, as our house was on a hill. As 
Art had his work to do at the Store, it was necessary for me to go 
out with the boys and supervise them. We also hired men to do the 
heavy work. Before going to the farm, we bought an incubator hold- 
ing four hundred eggs. It was so interesting to watch the eggs 



186 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



In twenty-one days the incubator was alive with the cutest little biddies. 
We had fireless brooders made for them on the farm. I took a great 
deal of pleasure in caring for them. I also had my first vegetable 
garden and it was wonderful to study catalogues in order to know of 
the best varieties of seed and etc. I had the earliest garden, the first 
peas in Provo and sold some of them to John T. Taylor for $3. 25 a 
bushel. 

We did enjoy our vegetables, being able to pick them fresh each 
morning from our own garden, also the lucious strawberries with 
thick cream from our own Jersey Cows, fresh eggs and home cured 
ham, and all kinds of choice fruits from our orchard. We raised our 
own hay to feed our horses and cows. 

As I had help in the home, I devoted the most of my time outside. 
I took great delight in trying to make the most outstanding butter. I 
had more customers than I could supply; although at times I was mak- 
ing forty pounds a week. It was not such hard work, as I had a fine 
churn and a large butter worker & etc. The buttermilk was delicious 
and I learned to like it better than the water we had to drink. 

The first season was a very busy time for us. We hired a great 
deal of help. At times I had twenty- seven people in the packing house, 
packing peaches and pears; as well as a large force of men out in the 
orchard picking the fruit. My husband loaded cars with our fruit and 
together with some of the neighbors' fruit, and shipped them to R. 
Bingham & Son in Omaha, Nebraska. I enjoyed every day I was on the 
farm, but I took too much responsibility, against my husbands wishes. 
He felt I was overdoing myself, so he hired a man, Roland Snow, to 
take his family and live there the year round. We spent many summers 
there and I hated to give it up; for our boys were at the age where they 
needed something to employ their time and give them good strong bod- 
ies. The boys had another thought. They felt they should be free when 
out of school to do as the other boys did. 

We had an understanding with Roland to take the boys during the 
summer months and supervise their work. He was a fine man, and 
we had much confidence in him. 

Art could always see something that was needed on the farm. His 
cows all had their pedigrees and most of the horses and hogs; which 
cost a lot of money. Sometimes I complained, especially when I wanted 
something new for my home or other purpose. He always had to do 
something extra on the farm. There was a silo to be built, a new fence 
to be put up, or new machinery needed. I told him it was a good place 
to throw money away, with scarcely any returns. Expenses were very 
heavy. His reply would be, "Which is the best, to spend money the 
way which will keep your boys from roaming the streets, and which 
would be your boys salvation, or save the money? 11 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



187 



During my early married life, Hattie Hands, a cousin of my hus- 
band who came from England to make her home withGrandma Taylor, 
lived with me for about five years. She then married my brother, 
William. 

When I was in England, I met Janet Poole, a convert to the Church 
during Art's time there. Later I was in need of help and she emigrat- 
ed to Utah and came to our home. She was a great help to me while 
my children were small, not only helping in the home but her influence 
was felt for good as she had high ideals. I am sure she suffered many 
times with the confusion when all the neighbor's children came in to 
play in stormy weather. She hadn't been around many children in 
England. She was very much attached to my two youngest children, 
Kenneth and Ruth. We all felt she was part of our family and missed 
her after being with us for nearly thirteen years when she married 
Joseph Munk of Logan, and went there to live. She worked as an Of- 
ficiator in the Logan Temple for many years, and treats us royally 
when we pay her a visit. 

I have always been inclined toward religion. It has always been 
easy for me to believe in the Word of the Lord, when spoken through 
His Servants. I have always enjoyed attending my meetings in the 
different organizations, in my youth and also in later life. I have a 
great satisfaction in doing my duty whenever I have been called. 

I worked in the Primary as a teacher with Edith Holt. Then I was 
made a counsellor to Mary E. Davis. In May 1913, our Ward was div- 
ided and Sister Davis was chosen President of the new Ward (Pioneer 
Ward). I was set apart as President of the Third Ward. I resigned 
after working about ten years. 

I worked in the Relief Society as class leader of the Theology un- 
til October 13 , after serving for nearly twenty years. At the 
present time I am a district teacher with my Sister Sarah McConachie. 
I feel that Relief Society is one of the greatest organizations of our 
Church. 

I have helped at many social affairs, bazaars and other things to 
raise money. 

I was elected Treasurer of the County Camp of the Daughter of 
the Pioneers, and a holdover the second term, making four years in 
all. Grace L. Cheever was President of the first term and Bernetta 
M. Beck the second term. 

I learned to love those on the Board and enjoyed my work very 
much. In June 1939 I was elected Historian of the 4-6 Camp of D. U. P. 
In 1941 our Camp was divided on Ward lines. The new Camp in the 
Third Ward will be called Camp Provo. I was elected Historian of 
the new Camp. 

In April 1937, Bishop Eves called a few ladies to meet him after 



188 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



Church one Sunday. He told us he was calling us as a committee of 
the widows of the Ward to raise means to cover the large room in the 
Chapel with floor coverings, after the remodeling was completed. We 
felt it was a huge task, but if the Lord would help us, we would do our 
part. Sarah L. Dixon was chosen as Chairman. Later she was ill, 
and I was chosen Chairman. We all worked very hard. We made quilts, 
rugs, put on a bazaar; but made most money by having pie sales. The 
pies were made by our own committee. Our pies were sought after in 
every part of town. We raised over Six hundred dollars in cash. 
Our carpet cost over thirteen hundred dollars. The balance being made 
up by the Church. We certainly felt the Lord had blessed the. "Widows 
Mite". I never worked with a finer group of women. 

Our children, all but Alice, attended the Timpnaogos School. She 
went to the B.Y. U. Training School. 

After Arthur finished High School at the B. Y.U. , he worked in 
the office of Taylor Bros. Co. for one year, then he was called to fill 
a mission to Australia. He celebrated his twenty-first and twenty- 
fourth birthday there. He was gone for four years. He acted as Pres- 
ident of the New South Wales Conference, also Mission Secretary for 
sometime. About a year after his return home, he married Maurine 
Goodridge. The have the following children: Elayne, Kent, Nancy, 
and Dixie. 

A short time after Arthur's return home, Lynn was called as a 
missionary to the Northwestern States. He served as Conference Pres, 
ident part of the time. He was released after serving about twenty - 
eight months. After his return home he graduated from College and 
married Celestia Johnson. They have the following children: John 
Arthur, Janice, LynnAnne, Kathryn and George Terry. 

Elton followed Lynn into the mission field, going to the Eastern 
States. He was appointed President of the West Penn. Conference, 
where he laboured for about two and one -half years. On March 31, 
1926 he married Ethel Scott, their children are: Julia, James Scott, 
Paul and Louise. 

Henry went into the same mission as Elton, the Eastern States, 
and was there for nine months before Elton's release. Henry served 
as Mission Secretary under Pres. B. H. Roberts, with headquarters 
in New York City, for about one year. He was transferred to Conn- 
ecticut, where he became President of that Conference. After his re- 
turn he went to college where he graduated and later married Alta 
Hansen. They have the following boys: Henry D. , Anthony, Stephen, 
and David Arthur. 

Alice graduated from the B.Y.U. where she acted as Secretary 
and Historian of the College her last year. She spent much time and 
study in oil and water color painting and made some very fine pictures. 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



189 



After graduating, she went into the interior decorating department at 
D. T. R. Co. , to help her brother Lynn. She worked there until her 
marriage to El Roy Nelson. They went to Troy, New York to live, 
where he had a postion to teach at the Russell Sage College. They 
have the following children: Arthur Taylor, John Christian, Christina 
Louisa, Henry Aldous, and James. They had a nice home in Denver 
where he taught at the Denver University. They then moved to Salt 
Lake City where he taught at the University of Utah and later became 
a vice-president at The First Security Corporation. 

Clarence filled a mission to South Africa, the birthplace of my 
Father. He acted as Mission Secretary for over a year and a half. 
Then he was sent to Port Elizabeth to act as President of that District. 
He labored for twenty-eight months and was then released. He came 
home by way of the East Coast of Africa and the Holy Land, where he 
saw some very interesting sights. After his return home he worked 
at D. T. R. Co. and graduated from the B. Y. U. 

Kenneth, the last of our six sons, was called to labor in the Brit- 
ish Mission. He first went to Portsmouth, later to the Birmingham 
Conference to be the President, the office his Father held in the same 
Conference thirty-six years before. After two years he was released 
to return home. At Christmas time he started school and graduated 
from College in the spring of 1939; after which he went to work at D. 
T. R. Co. He later married Ethelyn Peterson. 

Ruth graduated the same day as Kenneth. She had signed a con- 
tract to teach at the Franklin School, where she has taught for three 
years. She is very much interested in oil and water color painting 
and has made some very fine pictures. She later married Fred D. 
Kartchner. 

My life has been a very happy one, although any mother raising a 
family has a few strenious and anxious moments and years, especial- 
ly during sickness. None of our children had any severe illness. All 
have grown to adult man and womanhood. 

My husband worked at Taylor Bros. Co. for thirty years, and 
proved to be a very successful business man, and was loved by those 
working under him. Some of the boys felt they had been working for 
others so long and would like to go in business for themselves. They 
wanted Art to join them. We borrowed the money to erect the build - 
ing where D. T. R. Co. is located. It was quite an undertaking, for 
none of them had but very little money. They all worked very hard 
and we all had to make sacrifices. After twenty years, we are all 
proud of the progress made. At this time, July 1941, they have seven 
stores with workmen doing a very efficient work. 

My husband worked day and night, as did the others, to make it a 
success. The responsibility was just to great and his health began to 



190 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



fail. In 1930 he had a severe hemorrhage of the stomach and was 
never entirely well after; although he kept up his part of the work. 
The depression added to his other worries. He had a slight stroke, 
which took the use of his limbs and speech. On the third day of 
I called the older boys and had them administer to him. After that he 
was able to get around and talk, but was never as active again. 

On December 13, 1934, the Doctor thought if we took him away 
from the business the change would help him. We went to Mesa, 
Arizona, as the climate in the winter was mild and dry. We spent 
three months there, with little improvement in his condition. After 
returning home we took him to the Clinic in Salt Lake. After a thor- 
ough examination, we were told there was no cure for him. He had 
high blood pressure which brought about hardening of the arteries and 
his stomach trouble came back again in a severe form. 

Clarence had a bath room put in our cabin at Wildwood, Provo 
Canyon, and I stayed there with him until two weeks before his death, 
which occured September 10, 1935. His loss was felt keenly by all, 
but I felt reconciled because my religion teaches me that after our 
spirit leaves this earth it returns to the home it lived in before coming 
to this earth, and progresses on. 

I was left with a family any mother could be proud of. All of my 
children are thoughtful and considerate of me and my happiness. 

Art's funeral services were held in the Stake Tabernacle on Sept- 
ember 14, 1935, attended by over one thousand people. The stand was 
banked with beautiful flowers. 

Five years later I was called upon to part with my sixth and young- 
est son, Kenneth, one of the sweetest and most angelic spirits ever 
sent into a home. He was loved by everyone. In fact many remarked 
it seemed he was almost too perfect for this world. I feel very thank- 
ful he was permitted to remain in our home for twenty- seven years. 

When he was fourteen years of age, he had rheumatic fever which 
affected his heart. June 27, 1940, he married Ethelyn Peterson. They 
went to New York where he took a six weeks course in Home Furnish- 
ings. He studied too hard which overtaxed his heart. On their return 
home they came to our home, but it seemed he couldn't regain his 
health. After an illness of two months, he passed away in the Utah 
Valley Hospital, where he was taken the week before, on October 31, 
1940. He was burried on his twenty- seventh birthday, November 3, 
1940. 

Again I had to hide my grief with an assurance it was the will of 
our Heavenly Father, who had a greater work awaiting him. His works 
and records recorded on earth will be approved, and a royal welcome 
would be awaiting him by his Father and other loved ones. 

It is hard to part with any of our loved ones, but I am so grateful 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



191 



I have seven of the kindest and dearest children anyone could wish for, 
left to bring joy and comfort in my declining years, in fact I feel that 
I am one of the most blessed women in the world. 

My Mother was nearly eighty-two years of age when she died. I 
have lost six brothers, most of whom were very outstanding citizens, 
Church workers and Community Builders. 

( The greatest part of the next few years was devoted to genealog- 
ical research work, and the writing and compiling of individual Pioneer 
histories. Being Historian of her local Daughters of the Pioneers 
Camp, she was the means of accummulating and having bound a volume 
of pioneer histories, which is now in possession of the Camp Officers. 

She has searched out thousands of names, bearing the names of 
her ancestors; submitting them to the Index Bureau and on to the 
Temple for baptism, sealing and endowments. ) 

EXTRACTS FROM HER DIARY: 

Sunday January 1 1 , 1942 

I fell on the waxed floor and suffered a very bad wrenched back 
and torn ligaments. I was in bed for about three weeks. 
October 28, 1946 

Suffered a great deal with my back, and for the past two years, al 
most a continious pain in my side and across the kidneys. Then I had 
a very sever pain in my back. I spent a month at Wildwood and after 
returning home had many X-rays taken. They showed my kidneys were 
clear. Other X-rays showed I had an ulcer in the outlet of my stomach, 
that my gall bladder was not functioning properly and that I had colitis. 
Later another X-ray showed I had arthritis of the spine due to a frac- 
ture in my back when I slipped and fell. A cartilage had formed over 
the old wound and formed a wedge between the vertibrae. I came to 
bed Sept. 16, 1946 . . . It is seven weeks today. I still suffer a great 
deal of pain. Dr. Boyer came in and has given me four treatments. 
I have already felt relief. 

While in Denver, visiting with her daughter Alice, during the lat- 
ter part of April and the forepart of May, she mentioned at times of 
having a terrific backache. 

When she came home, she was ready to go to Wildwood, where 
we thought she would be able to relax and rest and feel more like her- 
self. 

At times she was unable to sleep at night or completely relax dur- 
ing the day; which was something very unusual for her while in the 
Canyon. It was even necessary to get some sleeping tablets in order 



192 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



for her to get a good nights rest. Instead of getting better she did not 
improve, and finally decided it might be best for her to be home where 
the Doctor could examine her and give her the necessary attention. 
X-rays were taken and treatments prescribed, but failed to give com- 
plete relief. First it was thought to be her back, then the kidneys, 
then the stomach, and then arthritis of the spine and colitis. At this 
point Dr. Boyer was called in to try and help give relief for arthritis. 

One Sunday afternoon, Aunt Sarah L. Dixon was visiting with 
Mother. She feeling chilly and instead of her asking someone to pull a 
blanket over her, she reached down to pull the blanket up. There was 
a very noticeable pop in her leg, midway between her knee and hip. 
She cried aloud, "my leg is broken". I have never seen her loose 
control of herself as she did at this time. The pain must have been 
terrific. We, as well as the Doctors , thought it was a strained ligament 
or "charliehorse". .It was so swollen that a complete examination was 
impossible at that time. 

On January 4, 1947, the family, with Mother's consent, decided 
that she should go to the Utah Valley Hospital for observation and 
examination, for she was not improving, and her pains were getting 
worse. It was here on her 75th birthday, the 5th of January that she 
received many cards, visitors, and a birthday cake, made by her 
daughter-in-law, Ethelyn. 

After a complete examination, the Doctors thought it advisable 
that she should be taken to the L. D. S. Hospital in Salt Lake City, 
where Dr. Gil Richards, a specialist, handle her case. 

After about a weeks observation and another complete set of X-ray 
pictures, his diagnosis revealed a cancerous growth spreading through 
the bones, settling in the spinal column and her leg. Her leg was fra- 
ctured, which was the result of the growth spreading and absorbing 
the calcium in the bones and causing them to become very brittle. 
This cancer originated from a goiter, located much lower than the out- 
ward goiter visible in her neck. The Doctor stated that even had she 
gone through an operation for the removal of the one goiter, they would 
never have cause to look for this lower one which was trouble maker. 

As time went on the pains became more sever and .frequent. 
The Doctors recommended an alcohol injection in the spine to relieve 
the pain in her back. This was accomplished, leaving her completely 
paralyzed from the waist down, and for a short time she was out of 
pain. Later the pain developed higher in her back and in her neck. 
After 37 days in the L.D.S. Hospital in Salt Lake City, she passed 
away at 11:45 a. m. on Monday, February 17, 1947, with her daughter- 
in-law, Ethel, at her bedside. 

A BETTER MOTHER NEVER LIVED THAN MARIA LOUISE DIXON 

TAYLOR 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 
1872 - 1947 




Arthur N. Taylor 



A TRIBUTE TO AUNT RYE 



They ask, "What is in the name? " 

It seems to me, there is much that is unseen- 
Something of the divine that symbolizes one's identity, 

In this life and all eternity. 
There are names that stir the soul, 

When they fall upon the ear- 
Names, that keep us free from all fear- 
There are names we mention in revered awe 
Melodic, and tender like a refrain, 

And names of heroes that have be come - 
A part of our country's glory and fame ! 

There are names flashed on 
Broadway for all to see - - 

Names that signify a high degree - 
And just names of sweet simplicity 

Like "Aunt Rye". 
I have loved this name since the days of my youth, 

And idealized its owner 
For her virtue, wisdom and truth - 

"Aunt Rye", it is such a home -spun, humble name 
No glamour nor pretentiousness 

Did its bearer ever claim. 
Calm and serene she stood, 

Meeting life's tests and trials 
Believing life was good! 

Aunt Rye, was a participant in life - 
She liked to be in the midst of things, 

And share its joys and strife. 
Names were very importantto our Aunt Rye, 

Names of the living and names of the dead. 
She believed in "Salvation's " plan, 

She always had much work, ahead. 
She enjoyed "Temple Work". 

And always tried to do her share, 
For the less fortunate souls 

Who haven't the "Gospel" over there. 
Her genealogy records are well done - 

She toiled to complete them from sun to sun. 
Aunt Rye was steadfast in her faith - 

She loved the "Gospel Plan", 
She loved her God, and served Him well, 

She loved her feliow-men. 
Aunt Rye was a saleslady, 

She had loveliness to sell. 



193 



AUNT RYE 



Aunt Rye was a dreamer and planner 

And she always planned well 
Aunt Rye was a comforter, 

She was always where 
Illness and grief were despair, 

Her presence was soothing, 
In healing she had a skill - 

When asked if she'd stay with you, 
She always answered, "Sure I will", 

We all felt relieved when 
Aunt Rye was close by, 

Because of her helpfulness 
We could always rely. 

Aunt Rye was a historian, 
And a recorder too, 

She was proud of our Pioneers 
And preserved their life stories for all of you. 

She cherished her birthright, 
Was proud of her kin, their accomplishments - 

And what they had been. 
She painstakingly preserved their history, 

For all of her beloved posterity to see. 
Aunt Rye was a student, 

She liked to read, 
She appreciated talent, 

And liked to see other folks succeed. 
She endeavored to find out about the new things 

In her daily pursuits, 
In this way, she acquired much knowledge, 

And became an educated person 
Without going to college. 

Aunt Rye was a teacher of Z ion's youth, 
She loved little children and taught them the truth. 

Aunt Rye was a devoted sweetheart and wife, 
Always pretty and neat. 

She seemed to sparkle, her spirit was so sweet 
Her choicest role was that of mother, 

She placed that assignment above any other 
Her home was her castle, 

Her love and good- will did abide - 
The atmosphere was lovely; because peace 

And tranquility reigned always inside, 
Her family by good example were taught. 

She practiced doing good. 



194 



AUNT RYE 



Her character and service, 

Have honored womanhood ! 
Her family have all lived exemplary lives, 

As have their children their devoted husbands and wifes, 
This to their parents much happiness brought. 

Aunt Rye was enthusiasticand busy as a bee. 
She lived life abundantly, 

And gloried in its opportunity! 
She liked to work, she liked to play, 

She loved to chat with her family and friends, 
And always had something interesting to say. 

She liked to laugh, hike and swim, 
And was always full of vigor and vim. 

Folks were anxious to meet Aunt Rye, 
And passers-by would say, 

"So you're Aunt Rye Taylor, 
We've heard about you. " 

And soon they'd be calling her Aunt Rye too. 
They felt a close kinship, because of the nice things she'd do 

And as the greatest of all teachers, by example taught. 
Aunt Rye's splendid lessons to us all brought 

Renewed faith, better judgement, and many a good thought. 
It has been said that all we take with us, 

When we leave this earth, is what we have given - 
Service measures our worth. 

As our Creator challenged us, 
"To do unto the least of these. " 

Aunt Rye has met this challenge 
And her Creator will she please. 

Her widow's mite was always giving or her time and substance, 
So Aunt Rye has taken with her, 

Something more precious than gold, 
Her record of good deeds, 

Will bring blessings manifold, 
And the heritage she leaves, 

To family, neighbors and friends, 
Remembering her goodness; no one knows how 

Far its influence extends. 
And to show our appreciation, for this life so fine 

We can like her - so live, 
That we too may have something as worthwhile to give. 

And I know today in that 
"Eternal Home" not so far away 

Aunt Rye will not sit idly by. 
She'll be helping, always doing her share, 

And folks there too, will love our Aunt Rye. 

Rhea Dixon Reeve 
February 1947 



MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 



Copy of Letter Deposited in Utah Stake (sealed) Relief Society Box 

Provo, Utah 
256 North 5th West 
October 12, 1930 
TO MY CHILDREN AND GRANDCHILDREN: 

W hen you receive this letter I will long have passed to another 
world after having lived a very happy life. 

Having one of the kindest and best husbands, and the Mother of 
eight children who are very fine boys and girls. I am especially thank- 
ful for my parentage. - - - 

Since my marriage my husband and five sons have been in the 
mission field. Clarence is on the water at this time enroute to South 
Africa as a missionary to the home of his Grandfather for which I am 
very thankful for and trust that he will be able to locate some of my 
Father's people and get some of their genealogy as I am anxious to do 
their work in the Temple. 

Working in the Temple has given me a great deal of joy and I pray 
that I may be able to get more genealogy and connect my ancestors, 
which I know will please my Father as he died before he had a chance 
to do this work. And now my children, I beg of you to keep your fam- 
ily records from one generation to another. Whereever you can, trace 
our family line; go into the Temple of the Lord and do the work 
for those who did not have the privilege of doing it for themselves, for 
how could you feel a greater satisfaction than doing something for 
some one they could not do for themselves. 

And now my children and grandchildren, keep the commandments 
of God and you will be blessed and prosper. 

Read the Book of Mormon and remember how the people at that 
time were blessed beyond measure but as soon as they became indif- 
ferent, they forgot God and fell into destruction and decay. 

I bear my testimony to everyone of you, that this gospel is true 
and has brought more joy into my life than anything. 

Joseph Smith was a true Prophet of God and was brought forth in 
these latter days to establish the Kingdom of God upon this earth and 
this Church will grow and I want everyone of you to remain true to the 
end, so that when your earthly mission is completed, we may all meet 
and associate together as a happy and united family .having love in our 
hearts for Heavenly Father and each other. When this letter is read 
many changes will have taken place but our Heavenly Father never 
changes. Look to Him for aid at all times and He will answer your 
prayers in faith, as He has answered mine. 

And now my dear children I seal this up with my blessings upon 
you all. 

Your loving Mother and Grandmother, Maria Dixon Taylor 



196 



Arthur N. Taylor Home - 256 No. 5th West, Provo 




aMHM 



Front L. to R: Arthur D., Maria D., Ruth E», 

Arthur N., Lynn D. Taylor 

Back L. to R: Elton L., Clarence D., ^lice L., 

Henry D., 0. Kenneth Taylor 




Wildwood Summer Home 
Maria D. Taylor, Ruth E. , Eliza N, Taylor, Sarah D. Dixon 

nlice L. Taylor 



WILLIAM ALPOUS DIXON 
1873 - 1937 





Hattie Hands Dixon 



History of WILLIAM ALDOUS DIXON 
By Vesta Dixon Booth 

William Aldous Dixon was born in Provo, Utah on Monday, April 
21, 187 3 at 8:30 a. m. , to Mary Smith Dixon and Henry Aldous Dixon. 
He was their first son, having two older sisters, Alice and Sarah Ann. 
William was blessed by his fathe r on April 29, 1873. He had eight 
half brothers and one half sister as his father had two wives. For a 
while they all lived in one house and lived as one happy family. It has 
been said that either mother was a mother to all the children when 
they were small. It didn't matter which mother they went to, for each 
gave them the same attention. 

As the family grew they had to have their own homes. William's 
family had a home built in the First Ward, down on First South and 
Fourth East in Provo. They lived here for awhile, but it was too far 
from the other family so a new home was built in the Provo Third 
Ward at the corner of Second North and Fourth West. This home 
later became William's own home, and his own family was raised 
here. It is still kept up and being lived in. 

William's schooling was in the old Brigham Young Academy. His 
teacher being Karl G. Maeser. There may have been others to teach 
him, but I have heard him talk of Bro. Maeser. The school was held 
down on Academy Avenue (University Avenue) down by the tracks at 
about 5th South. The building was later used as Z ion's Wholesale Co. 
William only went through the Sixth grade, as I recall him telling me. 

When Willie , as he was called by his family, was just eleven years 
old he lost his father. That was an early age to be left without a fath- 
er. There was a large family left fatherless. Mary Ann, the second 
wife, was left with three boys, William, Parley and Albert and three 
girls, Alice, Sarah and Hattie. The other wife, Sarah DeGrey Dixon, 
was left with one girl, Maria, and six boys, John, LeRoy, Ernest, 
Walter, Arthur, Charles. Arnold, another son, was born about two 
months after his father died. 

William, be ing the oldest son on his side of the family, had to go to 
work to help support his family. After his father died, Willie did all 
kinds of work to help out. After he grew older, he was away from home 
on many of his jobs. He worked in lumber camps, on construction 
work and other jobs in many places. I remember him having a pict- 
ure of Mt. Shasta, which was drawn on a piece of brown paper with 
chalk and pencil. It was drawn by Mr. Sward, an old man from Provo 
who was with him on one of his jobs. 

William became fascinated with electricity and became one of the 
early electricians in Provo. He worked as a lineman for the Nunn 
Brothers when they installed the first high tension transmission line 
in the United States, from their power plant in Provo Canyon to the 
mining town of Me r cur, Utah. 



197 



198 



WILLIAM ALDOUS DIXON 



As a young man, William had rheumatism very bad, and was crip- 
pled from it for awhile. He had to go on crutches for two years. Dur- 
ing this time he tried many cures for it. He went away to take hot 
mineral baths, but nothing seemed to help. This condition left him 
with a weak heart which bothered him for many years; but later in 
life did not bother him too much. His rheumatism never came back 
to give him much trouble. 

William met a young English girl, Hattie Hands. She was staying, 
in America, with her Aunt, Eliza Taylor. At the time he met her he 
fell in love with her. He courted her for some time, before asking 
her to become his wife. They were married in Provo on December 
15, 1904. Their first home was in George Madsen's house on Seventh 
West just off Second North. At this time he was working for Taylor 
Bros. Co. in the furniture department. This happy marriage was sad- 
dened on the twenty-second of May 1906 when their first child died at 
birth. 

After a year and half of marriage, William's health took a change 
for the worse. He was advised by his doctor to change climate and 
see if that would improve his health. So William and Hattie moved to 
Redondo Beach in California for awhile. Next they moved to San Pedro. 
Here a daughter, Vesta, was born to them on June 10, 1907. Seven- 
teen days later, June 27, 1907, word came from Provo, Utah that his 
mother had passed away. 

It seems that after being in California for some time, his health 
forced him to make another move. They returned to Provo again. 
This time they made their home on Fifth North and Seventh West, ac- 
ross the street from Agnes Taylor. Here they had a son, Glen, born 
to them on November 5, 1908. 

Health failing again, they moved to California again. This time 
to run a ranch for Aunt Hattie and Uncle George West. The ranch was 
in Colton, just out of San Bernardino. He had Mexican men to help 
him run the place. Mother also had Mexican women to help her in the 
house. He came to like these people very much and learned enough 
of their language to talk to them. Glen and I used to be able to speak 
some of the Mexican language. Dad said we always used to ask for 
our food at the table in Spanish. Mother said that many times Dad 
would go to San Bernardino, to the market to sell the eggs and butter, 
and he would pass out from his heart and the horse would bring him 
home. Mary was born here in San Bernardino, California on January 
23, 1911. 

Once again, William and his family returned to Provo to live. 
Here they made their home at 3 90 West Second North, the home built 
by his mother. He lived here the rest of his life. 

William opened up a little store, after returning to Provo. It was 



WILLIAM ALDOUS DIXON 



199 



an electrical supply and confectionery store combined. This little 
store was located at about 275 West Center Street, just east of where 
the B. & H Pharmacy is now located. He did electrical wiring along 
with his store, and later on he had many souvenirs taken from some 
of the old buildings of Provo. He wired them himself for electricity. 

Here in Provo, on April 1, 1913 his wife gave birth to their third 
daughter, who was given one of her mother's names, Harriet Faye . 

He finally gave up his store, and went to work for Utah Power 
and Light Co. He worked for them for the next twenty-six years. He 
worked in the substation for many years, and then as their repair man. 
He was also the Electrical Inspector for Provo City for many years. 

William was a lover of animals. I can't remember when he didn't 
have pets of some kind, a dog, horse, cat. or chickens. . Most of the 
time all of them. One pet Dad had for many years was his horse, 
Ruby. He used to tell us the story of how he told Uncle George West 
that he didn't mind moving if he could only take Ruby and a large um- 
brella tree from his ranch in California. Uncle George said, "You 
can take the horse alright, but I'm afraid you'd have a hard time tak- 
ing a tree on the train with you. " The horse came with us. She was 
a race horse and used to run back of one of those two wheel carts. We 
had her for many years, and Dad used to raise horses from her to 
sell. It was really difficult for him when he had to get rid of Ruby. 
The City zoning rule prohibited keeping horses on our lot on 4th West 
in the City. Ruby was sold to Wren Wilkins. At least one a week or 
oftener, Dad made a trip down to see how Ruby was doing. We tagged 
along with him many times. Then she was sold to a man in Springville , 
and trips were made to see her over there. Later she was sold to a 
man in Payson, and William lost track of his pet. 

Uncle George West had been so kind and helpful during William's 
stay in California. He admired Uncle George so much that when a 
baby boy was born to his wife on September 27, 1915 at Provo, Utah, 
he was given the name of George. 

William loved fishing and hunting. He loved the great outdoors. 
He took after his father, I guess. He was always remarking about a 
beautiful scene. When we went on our summer trips to Wildwood or 
up to Fish Lake, he could see beauty everywhere . Mother used to 
tell him he'd be satisfied to live on top of the mountains as long as he 
had a pretty scene to look at. Then he would tell her she'd like to live 
on the bank corner and have the band playing at her front door all the 
time. I've seen him sit for hours fishing, waiting for a fish to bite. 
Maybe the next cast he would get one. 

He was pretty good at drawing pictures too. He loved flowers and 
always had a beautiful garden with all varieties of flowers blossoming 



200 



WILLIAM ALDOUS DIXON 



from early spring to late fall. His favorite flower was the red rose. 
He took great pleasure in showing off his flowers and giving away 
bouquets. He had a fish pond in his garden that he was very proud of. 

William loved children. He was also a great tease. I remember 
how he used to tease the children, and take their nose off. He would sh- 
ow them his thumb between his fingers. Or he'd take his pliers out and 
pull off their ears or he would ask them if they wanted other teeth pulled. 
The girls were always called boys, and boys were called girls. We 
used to go on our annual spring walk for water cress, and there 
was always the whole neighborhood along. 

He loved to visit the old folks and the sick, and take them a bou- 
quet of his prize flowers. He liked to go up Town and chat with his 
old friends. He always had time to say a few words to those he knew. 
Some of his old friends, he thought so much of, were: Evert. Richmond, 
Bill Haws, and Joe and Byron Clark, whom he worked with for so many 
years. Charles Hopkins, our neighbor, and George and Eva Hickman. 
Eva used to work in his store. 

He wasn't a church going man, but he believed in his religion. 
William had very high standards and morals to live by, and he lived 
by them too. He did not think you could be a Sunday Mormon and 
live right. You had to live your religion every day, not just on Sunday. 
He never put himself above others. One person was as good as anoth- 
er. Money and position did not make the man; it was the man himself. 

William was the father of six children: William Hands, who died 
at birth, Vesta, Glen H. , Mary, Faye Harriet and George S. Dixon. 
He always worried about his children marrying the right mate. I 
am sure he would be proud of them all and their families. He would 
really enjoy his sixteen grandchildren and thirteen great grandchild- 
ren if he were here now. He only got to see three of his grandchild- 
ren: Max, Shirley and Gordon. 

In January 1937 he had terrific headaches, which bothered him 
all the time. In March he contracted the flu. He never seemed toget 
over it or really feel himself after that. He seemed to get worse as 
time went on. The doctors said he had encephalitis, or sleeping sick- 
ness. He died Tuesday, June 22, 1937 at about 8:30 p.m. He was 
64 years of age . 

There were many people who came to pay their last respects to 
him. People I didn't know that he knew. He was well respected and 
loved by many young and old alike. He was a wonderful father, and 
his death was mourned by his family and many friends, as one of them 
told me, "There wasn't a better man than Bill Dixon". 



WILLIAM ALDOUS DIXON FAMILY 

Front L to R: Hattie H., George S., 

William A. 
Back L to R: Faye, Vesta, Glen H., 

Mary, 




HOME at 4th West & 2nd North 
Provo, Utah 



I 



ERNEST BE GREY DIXON 
1873 - 1938 





Biography of ERNEST DE GREY DIXON 



By His Daughters Erma Boshard & Leah Ford 

Our father, Ernest De Grey Dixon, was born December 22, 1873 
at Provo, Utah. He was the son of Henry Aldous Dixon and Sarah 
DeGrey Dixon, who were Pioneers and crossed the plains in Captain 
Martin's Company which arrived in Salt Lake City in the fall of 1857. 

Ernest was a handsome lad with blue eyes and sandy hair, small 
in stature. He had a marked resemblance to his father. He was always 
a very lively, ambitious and industrious lad. At the age of two years 
he jumped from a little chair breaking his leg. Later this same leg 
was broken again. In those days they put the leg and foot in a box 
attaching weights to it and suspending it from the ceiling. He was 
tired of lying in bed, so while his mother was off to Relief Society 
Meeting, he cut the rope and pulled the box down and then hobbled off 
to the Penrods, who lived a block south, and joined the neighborhood 
children at play. This left him with a slight limp the rest of his life. 
Even after his appendicitis operation he refused to stay in bed. This 
resulted in the pulling away of the stitches and allowing the incision to 
break open and further complications to develop. With the "flu" epid- 
emic of 1917 and 1918 when most persons welcomed staying in bed for 
ten days to two weeks, he refused to go to bed. 

Ernest was one of the first students to attend the Timpanogos 
School, which became the "Alma Mater" for all of his children. His 
education was interrupted however, by the death of his father, which 
required him to work whenever he had the opportunity. All the child- 
ren in this large family had to each contribute their share to the sup- 
port of this fatherless family. At the age of eight years he was carry- 
ing water on construction for the brick layers, and thus he learned 
to lay brick, which became his future profession. 

His f-ather had bought a farm in the North part of Provo, near the 
Provo River. After his father's death, the boys began making brick 
from the clay that was found there. Ernest, along with his older bro- 
thers, made the brick from the clay at the Brickyard, to build their mo- 
ther a new house at 270 North Fifth West. He became a very good brick- 
layer and contractor. He earned a reputation as an honest, reliable 
and industrious man. He helped build the old Provo High School on 
First South and Third West and the City and County Building at Provo. 
He donated much work on several of the L.D.S. Chapels in Provo. 
He was a member of the Building Committee of the Pioneer Ward. 

Ernest was a good ice skater and swimmer and a very good 
horseman and jockey. He rode race horses on the race track at 
Provo. He always had a horse around for his own use. 

In the winter time he would hook-up two horses to a cutter sleigh 
with bells on, and race down Fifth West as hard as the horses would 



201 



202 



ERNEST DE GREY DIXON 



go. He was usually the winner, especially if his wife May was at his 
side to whip the horses at his command. 

As a young man he learned the trade of barbering, but preferred 
the out of doors work of bricklaying and ranching. At one time he 
combed the intermountain country as a horse buyer. He would go up 
to Star Valley, Wyoming and elsewhere, buying up large horses 
(matching teams) of bays, dapple greys, white, black and etc. for a 
Mr. Duffenbach of California. He would take them to Montpellier in 
Idaho and ship them by train to San Francisco, California. Mr. 
Duffenbach then would sell them to Wells Fargo, to mortuaries, hacks, 
coaches, carriges or deliverymen for city trade ; on the horse market. 
He would always bring gifts to his family and especially gifts from 
China Town in San Francisco. 

Ernest was baptized by John Cottam, January 31, 1882 in the 
Eleventh Ward, Salt Lake City. He was confirmed by Alex McRae on 
February 2, 188 2 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He was ordained an Elder 
by Bent F. Larsen, February 4, 1917. 

In the Third Ward there was a group of young people who used to 
go out to Strawberry Valley for six weeks every summer. Ernest 
usually went, as he enjoyed fishing and camping out. Grandma Dixon 
and Grandma Taylor were the chape rones. 

When a young man he met Mary Ann Painter (May) and they were 
married on December 19, 1899 at Nephi, Utah .after an old fashioned 
courtship of three years. They were married in the Salt Lake Temple 
on February 8, 1917. 

Their children are as follows: 

ERMA MAE DIXON, Born September 10, 1900 at Provo, Utah. 

Married Arnold Boshard. 
LEAH LILLIAN DIXON, Born May 18, 1903 at Provo, Utah. 

Married Mayo Alton Ford. 
ERNEST ARNOLD DIXON, Born April 25, 1906 at Provo, Utah 

Died January 26, 1915. 
VERL GRANT DIXON, Born November 26, 1908, at Provo, Utah 

Married Adrynne Hodson. She died 1945. 

Married Virginia Poulson In June 17, 1952. 
RALPH DIXON Bom September 16, 1912, at Provo, Utah. 

Married Eva Ruth Ward 
RONALD DIXON Born September 16, 1912 at Provo, Utah. 

Married Verneda Jackson 
EDITH ALICE DIXON, Born March 2, 1915 at Provo, Utah. 

Married Bernard Carl Fallentine. 
In 1917 the family, moved to Duchesne, Utah where they broke 
ground and had a dairy herd for the Knight Investment Company. The 



ERNEST DE GREY DIXON 



203 



Dixon Brothers bought some 10,000 acres of land near Tabiona, Utah 
and had the first filing for water on Moon Lake. 

Ernest also belonged to the South Fork Investment Company, who 
owned considerable land in the South Fork of Provo Canyon where they 
raised cattle. In the wintertime they took the cattle to Lake Shore 
where they were fed wild hay from the harvested stacks. They had 
about 600 head of cattle. Father and Uncle Charles rode the range 
and took care of the cattle . 

Each summer we would go up to the ranch and live in a framed 
tent. The scenery was beautiful. Many of the family including the 
Taylors would go up and stay for a vacation and week ends. I remem- 
ber Arthur N. and Aunt Rye, Tom and Maud, Ashted and Kate, 
Walter and Agnes, and Grandma Taylor and most all of the Dixons. 
Then sometimes the Third Ward would have parties up there in the 
big grove (quaking aspens) or Ward Reunions. Henry Vogel would 
make candy and stretch it up there, looping it over a big hook fast- 
ened to a tree. There would be decorations in the form of Japanese 
lanterns hanging in the trees. It was a glorious place in the summer. 
I remember well the beautiful flowers in the pasture and the clear, 
cool water. It was so much fun. 

One day father took mother, Erma, Arnold and I (Leah) on horse- 
back up to the Lewis cabin. Father and Mr. Lewis showed us a large 
rug on his bed room floor. It was made from pelt of a large grizzely 
bear that had been molesting and killing his sheep. It was so big and 
beautiful, but it frightened me. Father loved the great outdoors. 

In January 1938, Ernest and May went to Visalia, California with 
their son Verl, who was a field Scout Executive stationed there. They 
went to the Rose Parade in Pasadena and on to Visalia to spend the 
w inte r . 

Ernest always loved children, his own as well as his grandchild- 
ren. He was a smart man even though he didn't have a chance to get 
much education, for his father died at a most critical time in his life 
when he should have received those early years of schooling. He was 
an interesting story teller and a fluent speaker. He had many life 
long friends and was so kind and generous. He was always on the look- 
out for helping the poor and the old people. 

In 1931 he suffered a stroke after which his health was greatly 
impaired. He died on Wednesday, June 15, 1938 at Provo, Utah. 



204 



ERNEST DE GREY DIXON 



Copied from The Provo Evening Herald 
Wednesday, June 15, 1938 

DEATH CLAIMS ERNEST DIXON 

Ernest D. Dixon, 64, prominent contractor and builder of Provo, 
died this morning at 6:30 o'clock at the family home, 579 West Fourth 
North Street, from heart trouble and complications. He had been ill 
only 10 days. 

Born in Provo December 22, 1873, a son of the late Henry Aldous 
and Sarah DeGrey Dixon, he had always made his home here. He was 
a member of the L. D.S. Church, holding the office of an Elder, and 
was noted for his contributions in connection with the building of L. D. 
S. Chapels throughout the City. He was one of the first students in 
the Timpanogos School. 

His wife, May Painter Dixon and the following children survive: 
Mrs. Erma D. Boshard, Provo; Mrs. Leah D. Ford, Wallsburg; 
Verl G. Dixon, Visalie, Calif. ; Ralph and Ronald Dixon, Provo; Mrs. 
Edith D. Fallentine, Salt Lake City; seven grandchildren, and the 
following brothers and sisters: Mrs. Maria D. Taylor, Charles Owen 
Dixon, Arnold Dixon, Mrs. Alice D. Dangerfield, Provo; Mrs. Sarah 
McConachie, Salt Lake City; Albert F. and Parley S. Dixon, Provo. 

Funeral services will be held Sunday at 1:30 o'clock in the Third 
Ward Chapel, with Bishop A. E. Eves, presiding. Friends are in- 
vited to call at the Berg Mortuary Saturday evening and at the home 
Sunday, prior to the services. Interment will be in the Provo City 
Burial Park. 




ERNEST D± GREY DIXON FAMILY 

Children Standing: tr2 Erma, //3 Leah 

#4 Edith, #5 Ralph, #6 Verl G. 
Seated Center: Ronald, May Painter 
Picture on Wall: Ernest DeGrey Dixon 




Home - 5th North & 8th West, Provo 




CHARLES OWEN DIXON 



1875 - 1943 




Virginia Beckstes.d Dixon 



Biography of CHARLES OWEN DIXON 
By His Children 

On November 22, 1875 at Provo, Utah, Sarah DeGrey Dixon gave 
birth to her sixth child, a baby boy, who was given the name of Charles 
Owen Dixon. The name Charles came from her brother-in-law, John 
Charles Hall, who accompanied her and her family across the plains 
in 1857. Charles was born in a little adobe house at Second North and 
Third West in Provo, Utah. His father, Henry Aldous Dixon gave him 
a Father's Blessing on about the 30th of November. He was baptized 
June 3, 1884 by his father, and was confirmed a member of the Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, by John Holdaway. 

At the age of four, his father left on his second mission for Eng- 
land. Brigham Young had called Henry to go to his native land, South 
Africa, for his first mission. He returned from England in 1880. He 
was released earlier than usual because of ill health. 

Charles attended the Timpanogos Grammar School. His father 
passed away when he was nine years old. As soon as he finished 
school it became necessary for him to find a job and work to help sup- 
port his mother's large family of nine children, seven brothers and 
one sister. 

Charles' first job was with Provo Woolen Mills. He received fifty 
cents per day. He helped make brick in the old Dixon Brickyard, work- 
ed on the family farm, and helped his brother, Arthur , at odd jobs in 
his contracting business. At the age of twelve he worked for his bro- 
ther, John, driving a team, hauling brick, for $4.00 per day. He was 
known as a hard worker. Sometimes he hauled as many as 4,000 
bricks per day. His record for unloading bricks by hand was about 
three minutes a load. 

He had a great love for animals, especially fine horses. He be- 
came owner of "Billy Sherbet" one of the finest thoroughbred race 
horses in this area. He and Ernest would race their horses with race 
carts in the Salt Lake Fair, where they really did well. 

Like the other brothers , Charles loved the out of doors. He worked 
with the cattle up South Fork. One time he was sleeping in a tent and 
just happened to stretch his arm and it went over a huge rattle snake. 
He didn't dare move. He layed as still as possible and finally the 
snake crawled away. 

The Dixon Home was in the Provo Third Ward. There were three 
Deacons Quorums in that Ward. At that time they didn't consider 
the boys capable of taking care of themselves, so some of the Elders 
were called in. Brother Arthur N. Taylor was called in to preside 
over the First Quorum, William Clayton, for the Second Quorum and 
William P. Silver for the Third. William Clayton chose Charles as 
his first counselor, because he said he had such a great love for him. 

It is interesting to note the duties these Deacons had. One of 
their duties was to take care of the meeting house. They had to dust 



205 



206 



CHARLES OWEN DIXON 



it, keep it clean, sweep it out and make it ready for Sunday. Also they 
chopped wood and hauled it to the meeting house. Many times the pile 
seemed bigger than the Chapel. The older men chopped, and the boys 
carried it in. Charles never faltered. He was always there ready and 
willing to do his part. 

A few years later on a Sunday morning, as these young men sat 
in a class taught by John B. Fairbanks, Bishop Lewis called Charles 
and William Clayton and one other, from class. He asked them if 
they would go on a mission. Of course they said yes. This was really 
something to have three missionaries leave at the same time from one 
Ward. They had a farewell for the three of them together. 

On April 9, 1898, Charles received his mission call to go to the 
Montana Mission, which later was changed to the Northwestern States 
Mission. He was then twenty-two years old. He labored in Montana, 
Oregon and Washington for two and one-half years. This Mission 
was really a fullfillment in his life and gave him a lot of pleasant mem- 
ories in his later life. 

They labored "without purse or script" in this early period of the 
missions. They would sleep in haystacks to get out of the rain and 
only received meals when people were nice enough to give them some- 
thing to eat. He used to tell his children about one special lady who 
made such good lemon pies for them. Also, about the raw oyster 
cocktails which he couldn't eat when in Portland, and about going thr- 
ough the Salmon factory. 

One experience his children loved to hear was when he was in 
Butte, Montana preaching in a "street meeting". A huge man in the 
crowd started heckling him and finally he came up and started making 
motions as though to do him bodily harm. Charles just looked him in 
the face and rebuked him in the name of the Lord. The man dropped 
his hands and didn't touch Charles. 

At Conference in Portland, the President of the Mission, Frank- 
lin S. Bromwell, asked Charles to preside over the Branch. Charles 
was the kind of a missionary that wanted to keep busy, not sit around 
and do nothing. Many times his companions wanted to stay in, when 
it was raining and study or write, but Charles would say, "we must 
give this Gospel to the people who are here and the ones who are anx- 
ious to know something about it". He studied very hard. You could 
never quote a passage of scripture but what he told you exactly where 
it was taken from. He was earnest in his labor. He received his re- 
lease to return home on September 5, 1900, after having filled an hon- 
ourable mission. 

While helping to construct the Third Ward Amusement Hall, a 
large piece of lime stone, which was being laid up in the foundation, 
slipped and injured his leg. His leg was crushed so badly it was feared 



CHARLES OWEN DIXON 



207 



that amputation would be necessary, but he refused to submit to such 
an operation. He spent the next six months recuperating. His strong 
faith pulled him through. There was one spot on his leg that remained 
very tender, and he had to guard it so it wouldn't get hurt again. 

During his convalescence he worked in the office with his brother, 
John DeGrey, who was State Treasurer in Salt Lake City. 

The Dixon Family, together with the Taylor families and other 
close friends, would spend some parts of their summer in camping 
out on the South Fork of the Provo River. The time was spent in fish- 
ing, hiking, shooting and relaxing. The idea of buying up two of the 
homesteads in the South Fork area and forming a cattle company turn- 
ed into reality in the latter part of 1903, when John, LeRoy, Ernest, 
Charles Dixon and Thomas N. , Arthur N. , and Ashted Taylor or- 
ganized the South Fork Cattle Co. Adjoining the two homesteads, they 
bought a large tract of land, which they leased from the Government 
for grazing purposes. A beautiful, young herd of balle-faced cattle 
was purchased and Charles was appointed manager of the South Fork 
Cattle Company. To supplement this summer range, 80 acres of hay 
land, west of Spanish Fork, was purchased for winter feeding. 

The shortest route for Charles to get home from South Fork was 
to go up on the divide west of the Ranch and come down Rock Canyon 
to his home in Provo. This route was traveled frequently by Charles 
in the summer. 

In the fall of 1908, his sister, Maria D. Taylor, records that he 
hauled the lumber and shakes for her cabin at Wildwood, in Provo 
Canyon, from the Strawberry Valley sawmills. 

After attending Stake Conference at the Provo Tabernacle , Charles 
was walking home with his mother when they were introduced to Virg- 
inia Beckstead, the attractive daughter of George and Charlotte Beck- 
stead. George was a well-to-do sheepman who lived in a large home 
on West Center and Seventh West. Charles walked Virginia home down 
West Center and talked awhile out in front of her big, lovely home. 
After he left, Virginia went into the house and her boy friend, Will 
Corbet, was waiting for her. She then broke her engagement to him, 
because she was attracted to Charles even on such a short acquaint- 
ance. Will Corbet never did marry. 

On August 25, 1909, Charles Owen Dixon and Virginia Elizabeth 
Beckstead were married in the Salt Lake Temple. A huge reception 
was held at the bride's home. Friends and relatives from all over 
Utah were in attendance. The house and garden were decorated in 
festive fair with lights strung throughout the garden. A banquet was 
served, followed by dancing indoors and out, until early morning. A 
parade, led by Mrs. Arthur (Flora) Salt, accompanied by banging on 
pans and other noise makers was conducted through Provo Pioneer 



208 



CHARLES OWEN DIXON 



Park. The bride wore a beautiful white satin dress. This was con- 
sidered to be the biggest social event of the year. 

Charles was eleven years older than Virginia, and having worked 
so hard in his young life was able to build a beautiful white brick home 
on Fifth West and Third North, for his lovely bride. They furnished 
it with the best of furnishings and had it all paid for before their wed- 
ding day. 

Virginia had four girls delivered by Dr. Fred Taylor. Child no. 
5 was a boy which certainly thrilled Charles and Virginia. The young- 
est child delivered by old Dr. Fred was another little girl. Listed are 
the children: 

VaLera Born August 21, 1910 



Ruby 
Stella 

Alice Delenna 
Owen George 
Virginia 



July 26, 1912 

June 26, 1915 

November 18, 1917 

March 28, 1920 

June 4, 1922 



Charles and Virginia had a one seated buggy and they would hitch 
up the Kentucky, blue grass, pedigreed, thorough-bred horse, "Billy 
Sherbet", and away they would go. One time they went clear to Duch- 
esne and had Valera and Ruby with them. Charles would tease her 
after those trips and tell her they should move out there. She had her 
beautiful home in the city and she did get quite provoked at this. She 
did not want to go out and live in the sage brush. 

In order to adequately provide shelter for his prize horses, cows 
and pigs, Charles purchased quite a large tract of land in the middle 
of the same block where he had built his home. He built a large barn, 
grainery and pig pen. The barn joined onto his brother , Arthur's lot 
to the Southwest. This was near to his house and large enough to 
accomodate his wagons, teams of horses and made it possible for 
him to utilize his backyard for growing a garden. He took great 
pride and delight in cultivating and raising produce for his family, 
friends and neighbors. 

At Easter time the children loved to go and play in this big barn. 
They would dye their eggs and go down to the barn and climb the ladder 
up in the hay loft. Hide the eggs and play. Then they would go down 
and climb in the big tin- lined grainery that was full of nice, clean 
wheat. 

VaLera and Ruby had to take turns taking the cows; Bossy, a Jer- 
sey, and Reddy, the Guernsey to the herd. The herd went along 6th 
West Street, early in the morning. Then they would have to meet the 
herd at night. Reddy was quite mean and she would get away some 
of the time . 

Charles was a lover of children. He would take them on his knee 
and bounce them like a horse and sing: "Apples for a penny, buy my 



CHARLES OWEN DIXON 



209 



fine strawberries, apples for a penny, you must taste before you 
buy". This was repeated many times. This song turned out to be the 
best way to get his children to sleep. He loved his wife dearly. She 
was the most beautiful thing in the world to him. He loved her clean- 
liness, the way she would wear talcum powder instead of a lot of make- 
up, her long dark-brown hair that she could sit on, her lovely blue 
eyes, oval face with dimples, and her queenly stature. 

What a sadness it was when his lovely wife died on the 19th of 
August 1922, just two months after their youngest baby was born. The 
children were small. VaLera the oldest, was twelve. During this sad 
time he received a great deal of comfort and help from his mother and 
her mother, and all others that lived in the Third Ward, especially on 
Fifth West, which was called "Sandy Alley" because of so many red- 
headed Dixon and Taylors that lived on this street. 

Va Lera recalls: "Grandma Dixon was short, plump and a jolly 
little woman. I remember her living at Aunt Leek's and Uncle Roy's. 
Some days you would see her walking down Fifth West, visiting her 
sons and daughter. When mother died, I was just twelve years old. 
Grandma came to stay with us for a time to help take care of Virginia, 
the baby of two months. I thinkGrandma was about seventy-nine years 
old then. Father would get up in the night to feed the baby so Grand- 
ma wouldn't have to do it. She taught me to make bread. Father 
bought a bread mixer that mixed eight loaves of bread. I was short 
and had to stand on a chair to turn the handle of the mixer which was 
fastened onto another chair. I would turn until a dough ball formed, 
then I would put the lid on it and let it raise all night. Then in the 
morning I would get up and make the dough into eight loaves of bread 
and bake it in a huge black pan in the oven of a coal stove, before go- 
ing to school. This would last the family about two days. Grandma 
helped us organize our house work. The work of cleaning the house, 
each week, was divided among the four girls and one boy, each taking 
their turn at the various jobs. She was neat and clean and wore blous- 
es and dark skirts that reached to the floor. She always wore black 
shoes and sometimes wore a shawl around her shoulders. She was 
kind and devoted to her children". 

Grandmother Beckstead was also very helpful to the children 
after Grandmother Dixon died. She did beautiful hand work and made 
so many nice things for the girls trousseau. The children were really 
proud to go to town with her, especially the Farmers & Merchants 
Bank. She knew so many people in there and as Grandfather had left 
her quite a sum of money when he died; they would really cater to her. 
The nice clothes she bought the children really helped. 

For many years, until his health failed him, Charles worked for 
Dave Stagg in the Provo City Road Department. Soon after the World 



210 



CHARLES OWEN DIXON 



War I when surplus equipment became available, Provo City obtained 
a large truck for the Street Department. Although at this time, Charles 
had never learned to drive a car, he was assigned to this truck for the 
hauling of gravel onto the Provo Streets. I am sure his horse "Billy 
Sherbet" would have left this truck in his dust many time over, but 
"Billy" was a race horse and this truck was a "workhorse". 

When Charles health forced him to resign, he spent a great deal 
of his time on his Slate Canyon Farm. It was originally owned by his 
father. It had previously been only good for grazing livestock, but 
Charles converted this rock and gravel pile into a beautiful and prod- 
uctive strawberry patch and fruit orchard. This was a lot of work for 
the children, especially with only one son, Owen, to do the heavy work. 
Many early mornings were spent cutting off strawberry runners in the 
kitchen, and then going out to plant them. Later to pick the berries 
and sell them. The fruit was the best on the market, and drew prem- 
ium prices each season. 

After his wife, Virginia, died he depended very much on his sis- 
ter, "Aunt Rye" and his sister-in-law- "Aunt Leek". When he was sick 
the children would run for "Aunt Rye". She would have a stew or rice 
pudding to give the children on their way home from school for their 
supper. "Aunt Rene", next door would help the children put up peach- 
es and help with their house cleaning jobs. "Aunt Lou" made the best 
candy at Christmas time and would give the children money for rim- 
ing errands. "Aunt Sarah" would pay the children for helping her with 
housework. And so it was, lots of loving neighbors to help and guide 
the children. In the summers they enjoyed staying with their Aunts 
in Provo Canyon at "Wildwood". 

Charles died on March 3, 1943, having literally worked himself 
to death. After his wife died his life was very lonely. He loved his 
children and family, but the gap could not be filled. He never lost his 
testimony of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and was rewarded by a beauti- 
ful funeral that expressed the virtues of his life. His life was a life 
of devotion to his family and to his Church. He taught goodness, truth, 
honesty, character and good conduct . .to keep our free agency we 
should work more - not less, that we will have higher standards and a 
better life if we take responsibility. We were to look for humility, 
not prestige, education - not money; and he taught that religion was 
power which must be used towards righteous living. That Christ 
taught by example and this is the way we should teach. 



CHivKLiuS 0. DIXON FaMILY 



Back Row L. to R: Ruby, Alice, Valera, Stella. 
Front Row L. to R: Owen, Virginia, Charles, Sarah D 




Charles 0. Dixon home - 295 No. 5th West, Provo 



ALBERT FREDERICK DIXON 
1876 - 1945 




Sena Rasmus sen Dixon 



ALBERT FREDERICK DIXON 
By Arthur D. Taylor 

Albert Frederick Dixon was born in Provo, Utah on March 31, 
1876. He was blessed and given his name by his father, Henry Aldous 
Dixon, on April 8, 1876, nine days after his birth. He was baptized on 
the third day of June 1884 and confirmed a member of the Latter Day 
Saints Church by Edward Harding the same day. His father, Henry 
Aldous Dixon, came from South Africa and his mother, Mary Anne 
Smith, came from Hull, England, where they were converts to the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. 

Albert spent his boyhood days in the Provo Third Ward where he 
grew to manhood. He was of an affectionate disposition and was well 
liked by his boyhood friends. As a young man he was very popular 
and was very active in social functions of the Provo Third Ward. 
He had many friends in the town. He left school at an early age and 
went to work on a construction gang that was building a railroad thro- 
ugh Cedar Valley to Mercur, Utah, a mining camp at that time. Sev- 
eral Provo men were contractors on this project and his sister, Alice, 
was employed as a cook in the camp. When the construction work of 
the Salt Lake and Mercur Railroad was completed, he went to work for 
the Railroad as a brakeman and later became a conductor on the line. 
He operated between Lehi Junction and Mercur. He became very well 
known by all the people of Lehi, Cedar Valley and Mercur and was 
popular at the old time dances held at Fairfield. 

In 1902 he left railroading to answer a call from his Church to go 
on a Mission to England. He travelled with his sister, Maria Dixon 
Taylor, who was going to join her husband then serving on a Mission 
in Birmingham, England. While on his Mission he was privileged to 
work in Hull, the home of his relatives, and the home of his mother 
before she migrated to Utah. While in Hull he was the means of bring- 
ing his cousin, Fanny Smith Shearsmith and her family of girls into 
the Church. They later migrated to Provo. 

When he returned from his Mission in 1904, he went to work for 
Taylor Brothers Company as a salesman of Pianos, Organs and Home 
Furnishings. His work took him to the coal mining camps in Carbon 
County and the towns of Southern Utah. He had an uncanny talent of 
making friends with foreigners and with the people in small towns and 
country districts. He was a very successful salesman and was held 
in high esteem by the Taylor Brothers Company. After several years 
he left the Taylor Brothers Company to work with his brother, LeRoy 
Dixon, in the Real Estate and Insurance business. After sometime 
selling insurance for the Dixon Real Estate Company he was approach- 
ed by the Taylor Brothers Company to accept the position of Manager 
of their new store they were opening at Spanish Fork, Utah. He accept- 



211 



212 



ALBERT FREDERICK DIXON 



ed the position and moved with his family to Spanish Fork. He was 
well liked by the people of Spanish Fork and was very active in civic 
and church affairs there. The business thrived under his direction 
and he was unusually successful. 

In 1921, Arthur N. Taylor, one of The Taylor Brothers, and sev- 
eral of the Company employees decided to form a company and oper- 
ate a chain store Home Furnishings organization. They asked Albert 
to join with them. He became Vice-president of the new firm. They 
used his name, DDCON, as the first word in the new company's name; 
the second word, TAYLOR, after the President and General Manager 
Arthur N. Taylor; and the third word, RUSSELL, after the Secretary, 
Sidney W. Russell. Thus the name Dixon-Taylor-Russell Co. became 
the name of the new corporation. In 1929 they were operating ten 
stores in Utah County, Juab County, Wasatch County and Carbon Coun- 
ty, as well as sales districts in Millard County, Sevier County, San- 
pete County and through the southern part of the State of Utah. 

At the death of Arthur N. Taylor , President and General Manager, 
in 1935, Albert became President of the Dixon- Taylor-Russell Co. 
and served as such until his death in 1945. 

In his travels as a salesman for Taylor Brothers Co. he met a 
young lady in Ephraim, Utah, that he admired, by the name of Sena 
Rasmussen. He married her in the Manti Temple on March 23, 1910. 
They had nine children. Five of them lived to maturity: Harry 
Albert, Mildred, Norma, Vera and Melvin R. Three died in infancy: 
Clifton, Elmo Arthur, and Ruth. One child was still born. His wife 
Sena died in Provo, March 16, 1944 and was buried in the Provo City 
Cemete ry. 

Albert was an active member of the L.D.S. Church all of his life. 
He filled a successful Mission in England. He was a Sunday School 
Superintendent and filled many positions in other Ward Organizations. 
He was a High Priest at the time of his death. 

While on a visit with his daughter in Berkeley, California, he had 
a heart attack and died August 18, 1945. His body was returned to 
Provo. His funeral services were held in the Provo Fifth Ward Chapel 
and he was buried along side his wife in the Provo City Cemetery. 

Albert Frederick Dixon resembled his father, Henry Aldous Dixon 
in body stature in many ways. Like his father also, he was kind and 
loved people and especially he loved children and they loved him. He 
was strictly honest and trusted by all men. He loved the out-of-doors 
and enjoyed many hunting and fishing expeditions. He was a talented 
salesman, a successful business man, a faithful member of his Church 
and a kind and loving father to his family. At his funeral service one 
of the speakers read the following words which he said fit the life of 
his dear friend Albert: 



ALBERT FREDERICK DIXON 



213 



"Sort of man you'd like to be; 
Balanced well and truly square; 
Patient in adversity, 
Generous when skies were fair, 
Never rash in work or deed, 
Quick to come and slow to go 
In a neighbor's time of need. " 

Never arrogant or proud, 
On he went with manor mild; 
Never quarrelsome or loud, 
Just as simple as a child; 
Honest, Patient, Brave and True; 
Thus he lived from day to day, 
Doing what he found to do 
In a cheerful sort of way. " 



PROVO CIVIC, CHURCH LEADER DIES 



( Copied from The Salt Lake Tribune, August 20, 1945 ) 

Tribune Leased Wire - Provo --- ALBERT FREDERICK DIXON 
69, President of Dixon-Taylor-Russell Co. and prominent Provo Church 
man, died of a heart attack Saturday at the Berkeley, Calif, general 
hospital, according to word received by relatives here. 

Mr. Dixon left Wednesday for California with his daughter, Mrs. 
Norma Jess, who was moving to Berkeley, and suffered the heart at- 
tack at her home. He was rushed to the general hospital, and died 
there a few hours later. 

He was born March 31, 1876, in Provo, a son of Henry Aldous 
Dixon and Mary Smith Dixon, and received his early education in the 
Provo City Schools . He later attended the old Brigham Young Academy. 
STARTED IN RAILROAD 

Mr. Dixon took his first job as a construction worker on the old 
Salt Lake and Mercur railroad, and after completion of the railroad 
line became a brakeman with the Company. In 1902 he was called to 
fill a mission for the L.D.S. Church, and entered the British Mission 
field for a two year term with his sister, Mrs. Arthur N. Taylor. 

Upon his return from England, Mr. Dixon worked for Taylor 
Brothers Department store, traveling for the store to all the mining 
camps of Utah and also to Southern Utah. In Ephraim he met Sena 
Rassmusson and married her March 23, 1910, in the Manti L.D.S. 
Temple. 

Continuing his work with Taylor Brothers store he became man- 
ager of the Spanish Fork branch in 1913, and held that position until 
1921 when he moved to Provo and became one of the organizers of 
Dixon-Taylor-Russell Co. 

Mr. Dixon became vice-president of the new company, serving in 
that capacity until the president, Arthur N. Taylor, died in 1936, when 
he became president. He held this post at the time of his death. 
HEADED SUNDAY SCHOOL 

An active member of the L.D.S. Church all of his life, Mr. Dixon 
was superintendent of the Provo Sixth L.D.S. Ward Sunday School, 
and also a Ward Teacher in the Sixth and Fifth Wards. He was a high 
Priest at the time of his death. Mrs. Dixon died March 16, 1944 in 
Provo. 

Surviving are two sons and three daughters, First Sgt. Harry 
Albert Dixon, serving with the U. S. Army in the Philippines; Pfc. 
Melvin R. Dixon, with the occupation army in Czechoslovakia; Mrs. 
J. C. (Mildred) Tangren of Provo; Mrs. R. G. (Norma) Jess of Berk- 
eley, Cal. , and Mrs. D. E. (Vera) Anderson of Layton; one grand- 
child; two brothers and three sisters. Funeral services pending arriv- 
al of the body from California. 



214 



ALBERT F. DIXON FAMILY 

Front L to R: Harry A., Albert F, 
Back L to R: Sena R., Mildred 
Melvin R., Vera, Norma. 



HOME at 72 No, 1st East 
Provo, Utah 



WALTER DEGREE DIXON 
1877 - 1921 




LOUIR MA IB EN DIXON 



A Biography of WALTER DE GREY DIXON 



By His Daughter - Rhea Dixon Reeve 

On the fifteenth day of the Thanksgiving month in the year 1877, 
the Henry A. Dixon family had reason to be especially thankful. It 
was at this time that a happy event took place in the small adobe cot- 
tage of Henry. His good wife Sarah DeGrey presented him with a 
healthy, blonde, red-faced, baby boy, who was christened WALTER 
DE GREY DIXON. Walter from early infancy seemed to appreciate 
being born. He showed an enthusiasm for life at an early age. 

His folks, like most of the Pioneers of that day, were not blessed 
with the material things of life. They were rich in Spirituality and 
Faith. Their children were their wealth. Henry being an obedient 
servant of the Church followed the command to live in polygamy. His 
second wife, "Aunt Mary", lived near-by with her children. At the 
time of Walter's birth, there were already nine brothers and sisters 
to greet him. He was very welcome and his mother boasted of his 
good disposition and pleasant personality. 

Walter loved his parents and Aunt Mary. He loved his brothers 
and sisters and enjoyed their companionship. He was always in the 
midst of things. He liked people and activity. He enjoyed good clean 
fun and had a keen sense of humor. He loved to laugh and see other 
folks laugh too. He would always see the funny side when ever possible, 
but was alert to the serious side, and had an understanding, sympath- 
etic nature. 

All during his youth he was considered to be timid and blushed 
easily. He was oft times called a coward because he refused to fight. 
This dislike of quarreling and fighting came from his desire to get 
along happily with everyone. He enjoyed a peaceful environment and 
was considered to be the peacemaker of the family and neighborhood, 
at school and on the playground. He had the ability to settle disputes 
and make everyone concerned feel right about the decision. He was 
sensitive to the negative criticism from others and tried to make folks 
feel good by praise and appreciation. He never hurt any one's feelings 
intentionally and if he was misunderstood, he was quick to apologize. 
He had a philosophy that kindness and encouragement could accomp- 
lish much more than nagging and force. He was always tolerant and 
would turn the other cheek, a trait that is admirable but caused him 
to be imposed upon and belittled by bullies. 

He liked animals and encouraged the children to have pets and 
treat them kindly. He would take pictures of cows, horses, sheep, 
rabbits, chickens and dogs. He had a fear of strange dogs, a 
phobia that came from a scare, when very young. He would make ex- 
cuses to keep from going to homes where the dog seemed vicious or 
did too much barking. The dog seemed to sense his fear and seemed 



215 



216 



WALTER DE GREY DIXON 



to enjoy giving him a bad time. When they had a chance to make 
friends with him, they were his friend as long as they lived. He liked 
sheep and offered his help to George Beckstead in taking several car- 
loads to Omaha and Chicago. Although this trip was strenuous he en- 
joyed it and appreciated seeing the sights in the large cities. 

Walter spent his childhood and youth in the home he was born in, 
which was located on the corner of 2nd North and 3rd West Street in 
Provo. He was happy here in spite of hardships and grew and was 
strong and healthy, due to the ingenuity and effort of hard working, 
thrifty parents. He was taught to appreciate the things he had regard- 
less of their little value or simple nature. He was taught to pray with 
his family, and secretly to give thanks for blessings he enjoyed. This 
trait helped Walter to live life more abundantly. He appreciated the 
Gospel, and his pioneer birth-right. He felt that he should never fal- 
ter in defending "Truth". He tried to live the "GOOD LIFE" to be 
worthy of his heritage. He loved his God and his fellowman and serv- 
ed them to the best of his ability. He had the power to win new friends 
and keep the old. His friends came from every level of social status, 
from the highest to the least. 

Upon the death of Walter Dixon, Senator Reed Smoot in his busy 
life at the Capitol in Washington, D. C. , took time to send a lengthy 
telegram to Walter's wife and family, saying that his death was a per- 
sonal loss to the Senator, as he considered Walter to be one of his 
choicest friends and appreciated the good that had come from knowing 
him. In constrast men underprivileged and even mentally retarded 
would have laid down their life for Walter, as he had given them kind- 
ness and helped them in their need without ever making them feel in- 
ferior. These were my Father's friends and at his death came to our 
home telling us of his kindness to them. Walter could always find 
something good about these (lost sheep). He could remember them in 
their better days when they were good students, or good workers. If 
he couldn't find anything else to boast, he would tell of their generosity. 
He once picked up an alcoholic from the street, much to the embarrass- 
ment of a family member with him. He defended the fallen member 
of society by telling of his schooldays at the Timpanogos School where 
he had been a good scholar, artist and athlete. Walter felt that kind- 
ness might help the poor fellow find himself. 

Walter loved festivities, holidays, and celebrations of all kinds. 
He remembered birthdays and always put an effort to make these ex- 
tra special days, something to be remembered. 

He was patriotic and loved his Country. He participated and help- 
ed plan and assist with the "Fourth of July Celebrations". He was gen- 
erally in charge of the children's races and sports, and either played 
baseball or managed the team. 



WALTER DE GREY DIXON 



217 



When the call came to join the "National Guard", of the First 
World War, he was one of the first to enlist. He took great pride in 
appearing at his best in his well kept uniform in the parades, and 
could always pass inspection as he was neat and clean and took care 
of his clothes. He gloried in the trips and encampments made by this 
organization and remained an active member until his death. 

He gave many hours of service on different patriotic projects dur- 
ing World War I and was one of the happiest of men when the Armistice 
was signed. He grieved for widows, Gold Star Mothers and orphans 
and tried to help them in their great loss. 

Walter liked Valentine Day as it provided an opportunity to be 
sentimental and let folks know they were loved by him. It also was a 
time he could play jokes on his friends with original valentines he 
composed. 

He enjoyed the changing seasons and the special things they bro- 
ught. He kept record of the beauty of each with pictures he had taken 
and colored. He would join in the fun of "Spook's Alley" on Hallowe'en 
and looked forward to meeting with friends and family around a festive 
Thanksgiving Dinner. Easter with its springtime weather was a time 
for hiking, and Walter with a crowd of eager boys would climb to the 
"Y" or Maple Flat. Easter Sunday would find Walter and his gang in 
Church enjoying the sacred program and Easter Cantatas. 

Walter's favorite holiday was Christmas. He had the true Christ- 
mas Spirit and was happiest when making others happy. He cherished 
his memories of childhood Christmases, and would tell his children 
about them. He would recall how after a sleepless Christmas he 
would jump out of bed, at dawn, and reach for his partly filled home- 
spun stocking, taking it back to bed with him, as the house was so 
cold. He would glory in its contents which usually consisted of a few 
peanuts, a rosy apple, and a few pieces of molasses candy. Such rare 
treats as these were really appreciated by the Dixon Children, who 
were taught to share everything they had. 

Walter not only shared at Christmas but all during the year. When 
ever he had a pleasant experience, he always wanted others to share it. 
So when in later years he became a father, he wanted his children to 
have fond memories of Christmas too. He planned for days in prep- 
aration for this event. His generosity worried my mother. After the 
gift list had been checked and the shipping completed, Walter would 
still come home late on Christmas Eve with his arms loaded. I doubt 
if anyone really knew the extent of this giving. His kind heart often 
caused him financial difficulty, as it knew no limitations, and his fin- 
ances were often very limited. 

He liked to don a Santa Claus suit and visit the neighborhood, 
leaving something for the children on Christmas Eve. How well we 



218 



WALTER DE GREY DIXON 



remember Christmas morning. Father would get up real early, make 
the fire, whistling all the while. We would sing Christmas songs and 
count the minutes away until father blew a tin horn, at which time we 
bounded out of bed to see our gifts. Father was as thrilled with our 
pleasure as we were. After all the packages were unwrapped and we 
had our breakfast, Mother would bundle us up and we would go with 
Father on a tour of "Sandy Alley", the Dixon, Taylor Street. He would 
enter every home calling "Christmas Gift". After playing with the 
children and wishing everyone well he would leave his "Christmas 
Spirit" to the entire household. A part of this day would be spent in 
cheering up the shut-ins. He loved older folks and was proud of their 
accomplishments in the days gone by. He always honored them for 
their service to the Church and Community. 

Walter believed that the words of the Prophet, "The Glory of God 
is Intelligence", were very true. He greatly appreciated going to 
school, an opportunity that he made the most of for the few years he 
was able to attend. He loved to learn the mysteries of Science and 
Nature. He was always seeking knowledge and admired the wisdom of 
scholarly men and women. He loved to read and express himself. He 
was a good conversationalist and public speaker. He lived in the days 
when folks were called out of the audience to speak extemperaneously. 
Walter could always say something worthwhile as he had a message 
and a command of the English language that many college graduates 
would be proud to have. He used the dictionary continually and Web- 
ster proved to be one of his best friends. 

Walter was an excellent penman, a skill that was really apprec- 
iated at that time before the typewriter became the vogue. He did 
shaded writing and was in demand to sign certificates, diplomas and 
the fly leaf of books. He was neat and accurate and a perfectionist in 
the things he did with his hands. 

Walter was a versatile fellow. He liked to draw and paint pictures. 
He had a creative nature and could add color to stories and things he 
told because of his interesting vocabulary. 

Although his actual schooling ended with his graduation from the 
eighth grade, his education continued his lifetime. He was always 
seeking knowledge and using what he learned. 

He admired and appreciated the skills of others without envy. He 
aspired to do things better than his talent would permit, but was never 
envious of the superior talent of others. 

Walter had been gifted with a keen retentive power. He could 
read something and comprehend and remember it without re-reading. 
This power of memorizing was a great help to him as he lived such 
a busy, strenuous life. He would accept an assignment and then find 
he was pressed for time, so he prepared his topic or lesson a few 



WALTER DE GREY DIXON 



219 



minutes before it was to be given. 

He was an excellent story teller. A talent which made him popular 
with the children of all ages. This gift helped him win and keep the 
love of youth, and he was always surrounded by a gang of boys. He 
could control children who were considered to be delinquent. He be- 
lieved that everyone was good. It was unfortunate circumstances that 
caused the wrong doing and defiance to social standards. 

Many boys and girls called him "Uncle Walt", although they were 
not any relation to him, because they loved him as their kin. 

One of the proud moments of his life was when a poor , underpriv- 
ileged man, who was the father of a large family that were not provid- 
ed for as well as they should have been, named one of his boys Walter, 
after my father. Some men would have been embarrassed because of 
the standard of living and the reputation of being "poor white trash", 
this family had in the community. My father was pleased and honored. 
He presented his namesake with a gift and befriended him and his fam- 
ily all of his life . 

Walter loved and appreciated music, although he had little talent 
in this line. He loved to whistle. He whistled on his way to and from 
work, while doing chores, when he was happy and when he was sad. 
We could always indentify his particular whistle and would run to meet 
him. 

We had a fine musical environment in our home. From childhood 
I can remember our piano. My sister Edna and I took piano lessons. 
My brother Fred aspired to be a violinist. After complaints from the 
neighbors, the violin was abandoned. Edna showed that she had real 
musical talent. She plays well by note and ear. Her family are mus- 
ical too. We all love music but can't contribute much to it. Father 
bought a phonograph and choice records , which we would play over and 
over again. He was enthusiastic about concerts, operas and dramas. 
He was a devoted follower of all the activities in the Old Opera House. 
I remember going with him to the Theatre. His only regret would be 
that more folks didn't have the opportunity for these cultural exper- 
iences. He was thrilled when the band played, and thought Prof. Sauer 
was a master as a conductor. He attended band concerts at the park 
and wherever they were presented. 

Walter had a youthful spirit and was always excited about the Cir- 
cus coming to town. He would take a gang of boys down to the station 
to see them unload. He helped boys get free tickets by getting them 
jobs, carrying water to the elephants. Walter never ceased being a 
circus fan. He loved the "Big Tops". He would take his own family 
and the neighbors' children. He would buy popcorn, cotton candy, bal- 
loons and participate in all the circus traditions, as thrilled as any 
boy there. Walter's youthful spirit kept him young always. 



220 



WALTER DE GREY DIXON 



Walter as a child had a vivid imagination. He was entranced with 
make believe and a devoted admirer of Bob Cunningham, a popular 
magician of his day. He liked all forms of dramatic presentations. 
He was a member of the Third Ward Dramatic Club, which experience 
was one of the highlights of his life. The fun that came from his ass- 
ociations with the cast, the obstacles that had to be overcome, the 
errors, and the receptions from the audiences, all were treasured in 
his memory. 

The Third Ward Bazaars were famous in this City. The Relief 
Society would prepare a series of chicken dinners and the Dramatic 
Club would furnish entertainment each evening. Walter was in his 
glory, selling tickets, greeting friends, and even helped the good sis- 
ters with their tremendous job by praising and boasting of their efforts. 
Walter would assume the responsibility of advertising these big events, 
wherever he went and was a big factor in the success of the venture. 
A typical hand bill advertising these attractions is as follows: 
GRAND BAZAAR AT THIRD WARD AMUSEMENT HALL, 
Tuesday, Wed., Thurs., Friday, May 12, 13, 14, 15th. Excellent 
programs each evening at 8 o'clock. By special request tonight the 
M. I. A. DRAMATIC CO. repeats that excruciating funny comedy, 



" PHYLISS'S INHERITANCE " 



CAST OF CHARACTERS: 

Philip Moringside, a promising N. Y . attorney 
Major Philander Mumford, veteran of '61 
Patrick Mooney, Sec. of Home Rule Assn. 
Peter Martin, Timid Young Man 
Paul Marvel, a Private Detective 
Phyliss, up to date wife of Phillip 
Phoebe, has been a widow on four occasions 
Penlope Mumford, a butter in at all times 
Patrice Mumford, her only child 
Angela - DORIS CLAYTON Alice 
Amy - MARY HOLDAWAY Pansy 

Patience - DORIS CLAYTON 
Press Comments: 

" At the New Third Ward Amusement Hall last evening an excellent 
play was presented before a large and appreciative audience". 

Provo Post. 

The Provo Herald states: "The New Third Ward Amusement Hall 
was opened last evening for the first time and a home talent play was 
given with great success and we are informed that nearly 600 persons 
attended. Every day from 12 to 2 o'clock, Chicken Dinners. Best 



ALVIN JACOBSEN 
WM. P. CLAYTON 
ARTHUR D. TAYLOR 
WALTER NEED HAM 
WALTER D. DIXON 
MRS. C. R. JOHNSON 
LILLIE HOLDAWAY 
AMANDA PIERPONT 
MARY RUSSELL 
ANNIE RUSSELL 
ANNIE RUSSELL 



WALTER DE GREY DIXON 



221 



dinner in the city for 25 Meals from 5£ up. Admission to each 
night's program 15£, 2 for 25£. Reserved seats 25£." 

Walter would then take these handbills to work and pass them to 
every one he met. Walter took great pride in serving his Ward. 

Walter was a promoter of sports. His occupation being indoors 
(bookkeeper) and one of mental strain caused him to be nervous. He 
felt it was beneficial for him to indulge in outdoor exercise for his 
health's sake. From the time he was a small boy, he enjoyed compet- 
itive athletics of all kinds, except wrestling and boxing. While work- 
ing at the brick yard, in his teens, he would go to work at a very 
early hour in the morning so as to work the required time and be able 
to have time after work to play Rugby or Football. In order to work 
and play, Walter lived strenuously all his days. 

He gloried in an early morning game of tennis. He taught his own 
family and anyone who cared to learn the skills required in playing 
tennis. He participated in b aseball and became the manager of the 
Provo Baseball Team. He motivated "Good Sportsmanship" and was 
liked by all the players. He was enthusiastic about his team and liked 
to win, but always felt concerned for the losing team. An incident is 
told wherein he was playing the "Eureka Miners", a team made up of 
rough, husky men of quick tempers and profane tongues. He approach- 
ed the pitcher and told him he had pitched a good game, which Walter 
meant sincerely, but the opponent thought he was belittling him and 
blacked his eye. Walter was the victim of many similiar experiences 
in his peacemaking efforts. Some of the most uncouth characters learn- 
ed to love and appreciate Walter D. , because of his Christian attitude 
and the influence for good he had upon their lives. 

Ike King, a good hearted, ruffian type of fellow said, "Walt Dixon 
was the best man he ever knew and if anyone could make him believe 
in God, he was the one who could do it." He became one of Walter's 
most devoted friends. 

Walter liked to teach the te chnique s of any game to groups of boys 
and girls. He taught his own boys to pitch a ball through the transom 
at an early age. Later he had a basketball standard erected in his 
back yard. This was a special attraction for the entire neighborhood 
and many future athletes had their first training in the skills of basket- 
ball here. 

Walter was a sports fan. He would skip his lunch hour, work over- 
time or evening, to get off to witness a high school or college game. 
He often expressed a plan of his regarding a Church Program in com- 
petitive athletics. At the present time this plan is realized in the 
Church wide M. Men and Explorer basketball and soft ball tournaments. 
Walter could see the results of wholesome recreation in developing an 



222 



WALTER DE GREY DIXON 



individual physically, mentally, morally and spiritually. He, like our 
Church Leaders, believed, "All work and no play make Jack a dull 
boy". To be a good winner and a good loser is one of the fundamental 
requirements of the "GOOD LIFE". 

Walter was a lover of nature and though he never had a course in 
Botany, he was interested in plants and flowers of all kinds and knew 
their names and something interesting about them. This love of nature 
motivated one of his greatest pleasures, that of hiking. He explored 
the wonders of the great out of doors. 

Walter thrilled at the grandeur of our mountains. He was with 
Coach Eugene Roberts on the first trip to the top of Mt. Timpanogos. 
He made several trips after, taking large groups, helping the women 
and girls and children. He wanted everyone to share the joy of this 
Alpine adventure. He snapped many choice pictures of the Aspens, 
Emerald Lake, the wild flowers, glacier and snow capped cliffs of 
this grand old mountain, Mt. Timp. 

Walter was always a booster for Provo Canyon. He arranged to 
spend his vacation every summer there. In his early married life he 
took his family to remote spots in South Fork where they really pion- 
eered in camping out, Walter was the instigator of camp activity and 
though the facilities were limited everyone had fun at the bonfire pro- 
grams, picnics, candy pulls, hikes and Church Services. Here away 
from all the strain and strife of civilization folks felt very near to God. 

On these outings , Walter was up early and was active all the time. 
He didn't get much chance to rest and would come back from his vac- 
ation worn out, but happy and looking forward again to the good old 
summe r time . 

As time went on, Wildwood in North Fork of Provo Canyon became 
a very popular resort, especially for the Dixons and Taylors. Aunt 
Rye's cabin was the hub of the resort, where everyone would congre- 
gate and visit. Walter didn't own a cabin there, but his family and 
friends supplied him with one every summer. Here again Walter was 
the popular man in camp. Always full of plans and schemes to enter- 
tain the young and old. Folks would try to arrange for their vacation 
to be the same time as Walter's, so they could share his enthusiasm 
and the fun. In those days cars were just for the rich, so most of our 
folks and friends went to Wildwood via the Heber train. It was very 
different than the "Streamliner" of today; slow, noisy and uncomfort- 
able. In spite of everything, it got to its destination and was seldom 
over an hour late. The "Heber Creeper" as it was called by moderns, 
had an excellent safety record with few casualties, except an occas- 
sional cinder in the eye. 

There was no porter service at camp, so Walter acquired that 
job and met the train each day with a wheel barrow to haul the folk's 



WALTER DE GREY DIXON 



223 



luggage to their cabins. He also was the official mailman, a job he 
thoroughly enjoyed as it gave him a chance to contact and become ac- 
quainted with all the campers. At the end of a week he was calling 
everyone by their first name and they were calling him "Uncle Walt". 

There was a group of teen-age boys in the Third Ward that didn't 
call him Uncle Walt, but a nickname "Uncle Heine", a character in 
the "funnies" of that day who was always getting into trouble and chas- 
ing boys who teased him. This group who idolized but made fun of him 
were a gang who had their fun without being destructive or delinquent. 
They would kick at his door and send him funny valentines. At Christ- 
mas they would play jokes and pranks on him and much merriment 
would come from these. They would take hikes and trips and were al- 
ways together. Walter chased them and was one of them, at the same 
time he had a ready, attentive ear for their problems. He gave of 
himself and his wise attitude had a fine influence on these boys. This 
gang stuck together throughout the years and most of them, such as 
Arthur D. , John Stagg, Wallace Thomas, James Clayton and Bart 
Parker, made outstanding citizens in their "community", and have 
lived the "GOOD LIFE". 

Walter's appreciation of nature and his love for people inspired 
another pleasant hobby, that of photography. Although Walter's equip- 
ment was meager and not efficient and complete, as in these days, he 
did an excellent job because of his painstaking interest and his love of 
this experience. 

Walter believed that good pictures would treble the fun of holidays. 
First the fun of taking them. Second the thrill of first seeing them 
developed. Third the never ending joy of turning back to them. The 
third reason has brought us much joy and pleasure because we have 
found that pictures keep alive those precious days that fade from mem- 
ory all too soon. 

He took pictures of anyone at anytime, anywhere without charge. 
He developed and enlarged them, and without training was able to tint 
them. Walter always selected a beautiful spot near trees, waterfalls, 
rivers or creeks; among flowers or in the mountains. To this scene 
he would add a child or children or adults. He combined the beauties 
of nature with the Creator's greatest creation, mankind. He liked to 
take candid shots of folks when they weren't specially well groomed. 
He liked to snap children at their play with dirty faces and sometimes 
an unexpected hole in their stocking. Walter loved the simple, common 
place things of life. Mothers in aprons at work, children and their 
pets. I can remember him spending a lot of time to get a pet setting 
hen of Donald's to pose for him. This picture turned out to be very 
unusual and was one of his prized possessions. 

Walter loved babies. It didn't matter whether they were pretty 



224 



WALTER DE GREY DIXON 



or what their complexion or disposition. He loved all babies and con- 
sidered them to be his best models for pictures. He would take the 
baby's picture , develop and tint it - give it to the mother when finished. 
One lady said, "the snapshot Walter took of her little girl was the only 
picture she had" , as the little girl died soon after it was taken. She 
treasured this little snapshot among her souveniers. 

Walter appreciated cultural things. He admired art of all types 
and encouraged struggling artists by helping them sell their paintings. 
He bought them for his home and for gifts for his friends. 

Another talent and hobby Walter gook pleasure in was the art of 
creative writing. He showed ability in language arts in his elementary 
school days, in Benny Walton's class. His themes, stories and poems 
were well received. His letters were always newsy and well written. 
He had the ability to say simple, ordinary things in a lovely way. His 
letters were the next best thing to being with him. Regardless of how 
busy he was he could always find time to write to folks away from 
home, boys in the service, missionaries, letters of congratulations 
and letters of condolence to friends, neighbors and associates. 

Walter liked to take words and make jingles and rhymes out of 
them. He used these as toasts and tributes to people. He had a sense 
of humor and projected this into his writing. He paid compliments to 
folks while they lived and honored them with tributes at their death. 
A lengthy poem enttitled "MOTHER" was written by him as a tribute 
to his Mother, Sarah DeGrey Dixon, on her 75th birthday. This poem 
was printed on cards and distributed to family and friends. 

They say behind every good man is a good woman. This was in- 
deed true in Walter's life. He had the good fortune to meet Louie 
Maiben in his mother's home. She worked for his mother, assisting 
in cooking for boarders. Grandma D. was very kind to her and she 
enjoyed living with the Dixon family. She became fond of all the fam- 
ily, but she had a special feeling of deep affection for Walter because 
of his pleasant personality and likeable ways. She was impressed by 
his kindness and consideration of his mother and family. After a brief 
courtship they were wed in the Salt Lake Temple on October 10, 1901. 
They visited in Salt Lake and attended the State Fair. When they re- 
turned home, Aunt Rye gave a family dinner in their honor. The new- 
lyweds were the last to arrive because Louie who was a fastidious house- 
keeper was fussing with the curtains in their first home, which was the 
same house where Walter had been born. This home was located on the 
corner of 2nd North and 3rd West Streets in Provo. Although the house 
was not modern or convenient, Louie kept it so clean and attractive 
that Walter was content and happy as a "King". Then too, she was a 
splendid cook. Her culinary skill was greatly appreciated by Walter 
who enjoyed good food and had an extra special sweet tooth. Grandma 



WALTER DE GREY DIXON 



225 



Dixon, who was very practical, loved Louie and thought she was a 
good wife for Walter, but criticized her for putting too much frosting 
on her cakes, a fault which Walter and his sweet toothed family approv- 
ed of heartily. 

They lived in their first home for three years. During this time 
they were planning and building a new home at 232 North 5th West, 
Walter was fortunate in having brothers who were expert brick layers 
and builders. The interior was decorated, painted and grained by 
Louie's father, Henry J. Maiben, who maintained the largest paint 
store in Utah County. That he did this job well there is no doubt, as 
the graining has stood the test of years and is still in a good condition. 
That the Dixon Brothers built well for Walter, is still evident as the 
walls are still in excellent condition after 50 years. 

Walter's marriage was a happy one. His wife was very unselfish 
and self sacrificing. She was proud of his accomplishments and lived 
in harmony with him. She wasn't inclined toward social affairs. She 
remained at home, kept a clean house, cooked his meals, kept his 
clothes in good condition and was always prepared to feed the unexpect- 
ed guests Walter was always bringing home. She seldom complained 
about being left home while he attended numerous meetings , ballgames , 
and socials. 

Walter and his wife were not long in obeying the marriage com- 
mandment. The August following their October marriage their first 
child, a girl, whom they christened Rhea, was born. Four more 
children were born to them: Fred Walter, Donald Maiben, Edna and 
Amy LaVern. These children were fortunate in being born of goodly 
parents. They were loved and well cared for. There was always a 
pleasant, cheerful atmosphere in their home. I can never remember 
my father punishing any of us in any way, but by loss of privilege or 
a constructive heart to heart talk. My father was slow to anger. He 
disliked bickering, nagging, and angry words. When he was Supt. of 
the Sunday School ( a position he held for many years ) he would ask 
the chorister to have the congregation sing "Angry Words O Let them 
Never From The Tongue Unbridled Slip" and "Kind Words Are Sweet 
Tones of the Heart". "Love At Home", was always a favorite hymn of 
his, for the message it had was near to his heart. Walter loved work- 
ing in the Sunday School. He taught several different age groups and 
was happy to substitute for teachers while he was in the Sunday School 
Superintendency. He felt the lessons taught there were essential in 
influencing the youth of Zion to live the " GOOD LIFE ". 

Walter never missed "Prayer Circle" if it was at all possible for 
him to attend. He was faithful in his Priesthood and at his death was 
a High Priest. He was happy to be called upon to bless and administer 
to the sick. He felt it was a grand privilege to use his power of the 



226 



WALTER DE GREY DIXON 



Priesthood in this service. 

Walter was a stalwart member of the Third Ward where he had 
lived all but five or six years of his life. He loved the Ward and its 
people and was always active in service. He grieved to lose the assoc- 
iation of his good friends who were severed fromhis Ward and became 
members of the Pioneer Ward when the Third Ward was divided. 

Walter always took his family to Church with him, and they acqui- 
red the Church going habit at an early age. They have always taken 
an active part as have their children in teaching and working in the 
auxilliary organizations. Walter believed much good could come from 
home evenings and cottage meetings. His home was always open for 
any group to hold such group meetings or socials. He believed and 
lived the tithing law. He was always prompt in paying all his Church 
dues and gave of his time on all Church Projects. 

Walter was appointed to be in the Third Ward Bishopric as sec- 
ond counselor to Thatcher C. Jones. Wm. P. Clayton served as the 
first counselor. This group served from January 1919 to Dec. 1920, 
then George Powelson became Bishop and Walter became a second coun- 
selor to him; a position he held until November 26, 1921 when he died. 
His place was filled by Sidney W. Russell, a close friend and business 
associate. 

Walter enjoyed going to the Temple and believed in the challeng- 
ing work for the dead. He was a strong advocate of Temple Marriage 
and all his children except one have been married for time and etern- 
ity. He went to the Temple and was blessed before his operation. 

Walter loved the old folks and served on Old Folk's Committees. 
He spent many hours with shut-ins. He helped provide pleasures for 
them and helped them to keep their self importance. 

Walter was industrious. He liked to work and felt a keen sense 
of satisfaction in achievement. 

As a boy he worked on the farm and at the brick yard. While he 
was working here, he was dreaming of a later day when he could work 
with books in an office in the business world. This dream was real- 
ized much sooner than he anticipated. When he was 16 years old he 
was employed by T. N. Taylor, manager of Taylor Bros. Co. , the 
largest department store at that time. His job was being an office boy. 
Walter was so alert and capable that he was given a chance to take his 
oldest brother John's place as bookkeeper , while John was on amission. 
Walter didn't have any special training but read accounting books and 
observed carefully the work of other employees. He was loyal and 
faithful, and was concerned over the business as though it was his 
own. When John returned he was appointed to work in the Farmers 
& Merchants Bank. Walter remained in his position and became 
Office Manager, a position he held as long as he lived. By his own 



WALTER DE GREY DIXON 



227 



efforts he worked out a system of office management that proved to be 
very efficient. Auditors praised his accurate and well balanced books. 
They were free from errors. He kept books for the Eureka and Spanish 
Fork Stores. These branch stores did not maintain an office. The work 
would pile up and he would go once a month for a couple of days to bal- 
ance the books and get things in order, Walter went to work early and 
worked overtime, which was not required of him and for which he re- 
ceived no extra pay. He did this in order to maintain his high quality 
workmanship, which required more time than the ordinary working 
day provided. 

I can remember taking his supper to him and staying with him 
when he had to work late. My mother worried about him, so she sent 
me to see that he wasn't locked in the safe by some bandit. I'm sure 
if such a thing had happened I would have been a problem rather than 
a help. I always felt safe and secure when I was with my Father. 

Although his salary was small, he would never leave his employer 
to better himself financially. He was offered better positions at Z. C. 
M.I. and at D.T.R. Co. but he remained with Taylor Bros. Co. until 
his death in November 1921. He gave 28 years of devoted service. He 
loved this institution and many of his choicest friends were employees 
of this Company. 

To N. Taylor appreciated Walter for his service and as a good 
man. Every Christmas he would give Walter a bonus and a box of 
candy. He kept this custom even after my father's death and my moth- 
er received this gift until T.N's death. T. N. Taylor's sons still re- 
member mother with a Christmas gift. 

Walter, like Longfellow' s Village Blacksmith, "each day saw a 
task begin, each evening saw it close. Something attempted, some- 
thing done had earned his night's repose", 

Walter did not acquire wealth or fame with all his hard work. He 
was an ordinary citizen with hosts of friends who loved him. 

Walter had not accumulated the material things of life as he gave 
too much away. 

Walter lived strenuously and many times neglected his health. For 
several years, Walter had been troubled with a nervous stomach which 
later developed into ulcers. When it became evident that this condition 
was serious he was advised by his good friend Dr. Aird to have an op- 
eration, to which Walter consented. When the doctor performed this 
surgery he was really amazed at the condition he found. The doctor 
had depended on what Walter said about himself and Walter being an 
optomist he had not complained even when he was suffering extreme 
pain. Dr. Aird was assisted by Aunt Dora, Mother's sister, an ex- 
perienced and very efficient nurse. She never gave up trying to ease 
his suffering and did all she could to prolong his life. The doctor said 



228 



WALTER DE GREY DIXON 



most men would have died on the operating table, but Walter's sheer 
desire to live kept him alive for 48 hours. He was conscious until the 
end, although his pulse could not be detected it became so weak. His 
determination never to give up is seen in his last words. His son 
Fred was near him. He motioned for him to lean over him and he said 
in a faint whisper and a smile on his face, "I'm fighting, Buck, and 
I'll make it", but he didn't have the strength and his tired heart, that 
had been so generous and so full of love for everyone, ceased beating. 
A great man passed into Eternity on November 26, 1921. 

Walter had loved life and gave a life of service to his God and 
fellowmen. He had not feared death as he tried to prepare himself to 
meet his Maker and had done his best to live the " GOOD LIFE ". 

It is said that all anyone can take with them is what they have 
given away. Walter had much to take, if this be true. 

Walter said he knew that his Redeemer lived and I'm sure Walter 
is with him and is still giving the same faithful service, and making 
folks happy. 

A faith promoting incident in connection with the Latter-day Saints 
belief in Eternity is shown by an incident that happened in Uncle Roy's 
home. The February after Walter died in November, Arthur, the 
youngest of LeRoy's children, became seriously ill with pneumonia. 
He had always loved Walter, who was very fond of the little fellow. 
Walter had been in the habit of picking Arthur up and tossing him in 
the air and catching him. Arthur had missed his Uncle Walt and the 
thrilling experience of being thrown up in the air. The night Arthur 
passed away he kept smiling and laughed out loud, although he was 
very ill. Aunt Electa spoke to him and without opening his eyes, he 
said, "Uncle Walt is tossing me up", and he passed away soon after. 
His parents said it was a comfort to them as they believed Arthur's 
spirit was happy with his Uncle Walt, whom he loved so much. 

So ends the story of a good man who in doing good left behind him 
a monument of virtues that the storms of time can never destroy. He 
lived by his creed, "DO ALL THE GOOD I CAN, BY ALL THE MEANS 
I CAN, IN ALL THE WAYS I CAN, IN ALL THE PLACES I CAN, TO 
ALL THE PEOPLE I CAN, AS LONG AS EVER I CAN". 




Walter d. dixon Family 

Amy 

Standing: Walter D., Rhea. 

Sitting : Louie M., Edna, Fred 
Donald 




HOKE at 232 North Fifth West 
Provo, Utah 



A Tribute to WALTER DE GREY DIXON - 1877-1921 
By Rhea Dixon Reeve 

It seems to me, he is greatest who does the most good. 
Walter D. Dixon did not strive to be great 
He just lived in the way he thought he should 
And spent his lifetime defending "Truth" 
And always practiced doing good. 

Some men become notorious and live to enjoy great fame - 

Others because of their talents 

See Broadway's lights flash their names 

Some men become millionaires 

Because they're shrewd financiers 

My father worked hard for small pay 

Throughout his forty-four years. 

He did not accumulate riches, 

Or lay a fortune by 

It was impossible for him to save 

No matter how he'd try. 

Why? because he was always giving something away 

Signing notes to help folks who couldn't ever repay 

Gifts large and small without the giver's name 

Much of his earnings would claim 

When sent to collect a bill 

Which he did always against his will 

When he saw poverty, little children poorly clothed 

and underfed 
He didn't ask for what they owed 
But gave to them instead. 

His heart was so generous, he could never say "NO" 
He'd help the needy where'er he'd go 
Then work at extra jobs to make ends meet 
Others didn't know of his troubles, 
Cause his smile was so sweet 

Whenever his skies were gray he'd pretend they were blue 
While other folks problems he always knew 
And did something to solve them if it was possible to do 
Walter D. lived strenously 

He did not pray for release from his burdens 

Or a life of luxury and ease 

He prayed for strength to meet them 

And loved to serve God, and his fellows please 

He was just a common man 

Who lived in a simple way 

Just a friendly sort of chap 

Who worked and played each day 



229 



230 



WALTER DE GREY DIXON 



He had earned something money cannot buy 
A love and appreciation for all good things 
And a contentment that living for others brings 
He loved everyone and found good 

He disliked gossip and defended those who were misunderstood 
He loved little children and they loved him 
He sponsored all youth! 

Teaching and giving them of his Wisdom, His Love 

and Vigor and Vim 
He believed that all work and no play would make 

Jack a dull boy 
So he shared with them his love of sports, and increased 

their joy. 

Walter was a family man, a loving husband, kind father 
and friend 

On his interest and love we could always depend 
He loved music and although he couldn't sing. He'd 

come home whistling 
And we'd hurry to meet him, to share the happiness 

he 'd bring 
My father was a Church going man 
Spirituality was a part of his daily plan. He would 

have defended the Gospel with his life 
He practiced doing good 

Setting an example for his children and wife 

He loved peace and was a peacemaker wherever he went 

He had a way of making things turn out O. K. 

Then went happily on his way 

Feeling his time had been well spent 

He loved all nature, liked to roam in the hills and vales 
He had the power of expression in painting and writing 

and loved to tell tales. 
T'is said, True service is the rent we pay to the 

Landlord Life for the time we stay 
Walter D. Dixon paid well for his forty-four years 
Living strenuously for others 
Forgetting self always 
Caring for the sick and needy 
And cheering the shut-ins lonely days 
When his useful life here was done - and life yet to be 

had just begun 
He did not leave us wealth untold 
But a far greater legacy than silver or gold 
He left us proud memories of a Good Man's way 



Tribute to WALTER DEGREY DIXON 



231 



Who when asked to serve 
Answered I'll gladly obey 

He left us his creed - TO LOVE AND GIVE FREELY TO 

THOSE IN NEED 
LOVE OUR GOD AND FELLOWMEN 
TO DO GOOD EACH DAY 

AND LIVE THE "GOOD LIFE" IN OUR VERY BEST WAY 

We appreciate hearing his friends and associates say 

Walter made every life he touched more gay 

His philosophy is worth more than a great fortune to me 

He taught and lived his teachings too 

To love your neighbor as much as you love you! 

Give unlimited forgiveness to your offenders - 

T'is the best thing to do 

Give to your opposition tolerance 

To a friend your heart 

To yourself respect, to all men charity - and from 
the "Right" never depart and you'll live the 
"GOOD LIFE" well here and in Eternity 

This was Walter's belief and he practiced living as he 
believed. He was a Christian who practiced 
doing good. 



WALTER DE GREY DIXON 



Copied from The Provo Herald - 

HUNDREDS PAY THEIR TRIBUTE 
OF LOVE TO MEMORY OF 
WALTER DIXON 

For a time yesterday business in this city practically suspended 
when funeral services over the remains of Walter D. Dixon were held 
in the Third Ward Meeting House. 

Nearly a thousand men and women, lifelong friends of Mr. Dixon's, 
filled the church to overflowing, hundreds being unable to get into the 
edifice. The procession to City cemetery was the longest, bystanders 
said, seen in this city in recent years. 

Entertainments planned for the day or evening, meetings business, 
civic, and social, all were postponed in honor of the departed. 

" One of the best loved, one of the noblest of men, a friend of the 
highest in life, a brother to the most lowly, such a man was Walter D. 
Dixon," the tribute paid by speakers at the funeral. 

Bishop George Powelson, whose counselor Mr. Dixon was, presi- 
ded at the funeral. 

Music was furnished by Mrs. F. L. Hickman, Mrs. James A. 
Bullock, Murray Roberts and Franklin Madsen. 

Among the speakers who paid glowing tributes to the life career, 
the church services performed, and to the high plane of business effort 
pursued by Mr. Dixon were President T. N. Taylor and State Senator 
J. William Knight of the Utah Stake Presidency; Dr. George H. Brim- 
hall, President-Emeritus of the Brigham Young University; John S. 
Smith, Prof. Eugene L. Roberts , William P. Clayton and Bishop Powel- 
son. 

Invocation was pronounced by Joseph B. Keeler; the benediction, 
by Bishop John Johnson. President Taylor dedicated the last resting 
place in the cemetery. 

Murray Roberts sang a solo. A brass quartet played a funeral 
march as the casket was taken from the chapel, and also played sev- 
eral selections at the cemetery. 

The speakers, all of whom paid a glowing tribute to the sterling 
characteristics of the departed. 

The funeral was one of the largest ever held in this city. About 
500 friends of the departed and his family filled the ward chapel, while 
more than 200 were on the outside, unable to get into the meetinghouse. 



232 



PARLEY SMITH DIXON 
1873 - 19A7 




Etta Bangerfield Dixon 



PARLEY SMITH DIXON 



Parley Smith Dixon, the son of Mary Ann Smith Dixon and Henry 
Aldous Dixon, was born June 9, 1878 at Salt Lake City, Utah, in a 
little house on Tenth East between Second and Third South. Soon after 
his birth, the Dixon family moved to Provo which became his home 
most of his lifetime. 

Parley was an energetic boy, full of life, vim and mischief. A 
lover of animals, water, the hills and nature in general. Fishing, 
hunting and the collecting of all animal life, from white rats and snakes 
to dogs, goates, ponies, horses and cows, were his delight. He ob- 
tained possession of them by hunting in the hills or at the river or by 
buying those which he could not trade for, which was very seldom. He 
was known to his companions and friends as a very shrewd trader, a 
dominant characteristic all of his life. He loved chickens and during 
his lifetime acquired most every variety known, shipping them in from 
Kentucky, Alabama, Idaho or where ever he heard of a new kind. His 
favorite was the game bird. 

As a youth he belonged to a Company of boys that went to the dif- 
ferent towns in Utah County where they put on shows. Allie and Bob 
Cunningham directed the shows put on by the boys. Parley did slack 
wire walking and many other stunts on the wire. He also did tumbling 
and club throwing and etc. He never tired of practicing these stunts, 
and his Mother said she never had a clothes line intact when she 
needed it. 

As he grew into manhood he started the old adobe brickyard and 
for a long time he and the boys who worked for him made sun dried 
bricks. Many of the old Provo homes are built of these bricks. 

As a young man, Parley started to work for his brother Arthur, 
who was a mason contractor, and thus he learned the construction 
trade from a well qulified and successful teacher. He enjoyed this 
work and it became his vocation the rest of his life. 

In 1901 a very gifted and qualified school teacher moved fromSalt 
Lake City to Provo to be with her folks. She began teaching at the 
Timpanogos School. Eight years earlier, in Salt Lake City, Parleyhad 
become acquainted with this charming girl. Two years later Parley 
Smith Dixon and Mary Etola Dangerfield were married on August 19, 
1903 in the Salt Lake Temple. The same evening they were given a 
lovely reception at the home of the bride's mother. The bride's sister, 
May, prepared a delicious turkey dinner with all the trimmings. They 
had guests fromSalt Lake, Provo and Springville. There were so 
many guests in attendance that the bride and groom were required to 
remain at the head of the table while three different crowds were seat- 
ed and served. The table was a long one and seated about twenty people. 
Much of the evening was spent in serving dinner, but the remainder 
was given over to toasts, songs and readings. Bishop T. N. Taylor, 



233 



234 



PARLEY SMITH DIXON 



of the Provo Third Ward, toasted the bride and groom. In all, a love- 
ly time was enjoyed and many beautiful gifts were received by the 
bridal couple. The wedding dress that the bride was married in was 
preserved by the bride the remainder of her life. 

The first home of the Parley S. Dixon's was with the bride's 
Mother, Mary Ann James Dangerfield, at 575 North Fifth West, Provo. 
They started housekeeping in three rooms rented fromParley's Mother, 
at 390 West Second North. They didn't stay long for Parley went away 
to work and Etta went to live with her Mother. 

In 1906, three years after his marriage, Parley started contract- 
ing building construction on his own. This was his occupation during 
the remainder of his life. 

The two room home they were renting on Seventh West between 
Third and Fourth North had no conveniences so they decided to build a 
home of their own. Parley and Etta had now been married nearly two 
years and had saved enough to purchase a lot on the corner of Sixth 
West and Third North for $200 and to build a house (no plumbing but 
with electric lights) for $800. On their second wedding anniversary 
they were able to move into their own home. Etta was extremely 
proud of this new home. 

President George H. Brimhall of the B. Y. U. and Supt. Rawlings 
of the Provo City Schools were continously requesting Etta to come 
back to teaching. Parley felt that a Mother's place was in the home 
and objected to Etta leaving her children and the home. Once when 
Pres. Brimhall was desperate for a first grade critic teacher at the 
B. Y. U. Training School and once when Supt. Rawlings needed a teach- 
er in the City Schools. Parley weakened and allowed Etta to go back 
to teaching for the duration of the emergency. 

One of Parley and Etta's outstanding characteristic was the love 
of people - - - their desire to have people around them - - to be help- 
ing those less fortunate. When they built their large two story home 
on the corner of Third West and Second North, it was spacious enough 
to fullfill their desire. 

On the arrival of Aunt Fannie Shear smith from England with her 
three girls in 1910, they stayed at the Parley S. Dixon home for a 
short time. After Uncle Albert Dixon and Aunt Sena we re married in 
1910, they lived with the Parley Dixon Family, while their home was 
put in order. In December 1916, Etta's Mother and Father celebrated 
their 50th wedding aniversary at their big home. After George Busby's 
operation on his leg in 1912, he was taken to and cared for in the big 
house until he was strong enough to be taken to his home. 

Regularly the neighbors of their Third West home, the Becks, 
Van Wagonens, Penrods,the Garys , Ern and May Dixon, the Hoovers, 
the Baileys; met to play "high five" and enjoy the friendship of each 



PARLEY SMITH DIXON 



235 



other. 

It was in this big house that the remaining four children were 
born , and the Dixon Family began growing up. 

Parley had taken the contract for the stone and brick work on the 
Roosevelt High School. The only means of transportation was by horse 
and wagon. A typhoid fever epidemic struck Roosevelt and most of the 
workmen became ill and quit their job. Due to this and other factors, 
Parley lost considerable money on this contract, and had to mortgage 
his lovely big house to clear his debts. Financial conditions did not 
improve so the house was put up for sale and was sold in November 
of 1919. 

For the next few years Parley was found working on brick jobs in 
Provo and vicinity, at Delta, Davis County, and Grand Junction, Colo. 
During the year 1929 he did very well financially with his contracts. 

Then in 1930 he had a very serious car accident which disabled 
him for over six months time. His car was a complete wreck. By the 
time he fully recovered, the depression was on and in full swing and 
making a living for the family became quite a problem. 

In 1932 work became very scarce so Pari and Ett decided to get 
a farm where they could raise something to eat and thus help the fam- 
ily. They soon found what they wanted. They traded the house they 
were living in for a 15 acre farm in Orem, Utah, which was planted 
in fruit trees. 

For three years there was no brick work for Parley or the boys. 
The fruit on the farm provided the food and necessities that kept the 
large families living very confortable. 

It was in May 1933 that they moved to Orem, and the farm became 
an open house for their loyal Provo friends, their children and 
relatives. During the summer months there was plenty of work taking 
care of the fruit trees, have sting and selling the fruit. During this 
depression there was little money available; so in order to dispose of 
the fruit, Parley would load up a truck of fruit and go out to the Res- 
ervation, where they did not raise fruit. Here he would trade his 
fruit for cattle, chickens, pigs, cows or whatever he could get on a 
trade. Returning home he would proceed to trade these products for 
other commodities he needed. Although they didn't have much money 
they always had an abundance of good food to eat. 

On January 23, 1947, Parley Smith Dixon was stricken with a 
cerebral hemmorrhage from which he did not rally. He lived seven 
days, but he suffered no pain. 

"His passing was a terrible blow and his absence from home was 
very hard to take, but we felt thankful he didn't have to linger on in 
pain and distress. It is hard to express what he meant to his family. 
He was always generous and kind, forgiving and happy, not only with 



236 



PARLEY SMITH DIXON 



us but with all the many people it was his good fortune to know and 
associate with. To me he was ever the successful husband; one who 
lived his life to the fullest. He had the respect and trust of men and 
women, and the love of little children. The work he accomplished 
made this world a better place than he found it. He looked for the best 
and he gave to others the best he had. His daily life was a devotion 
and a tower of strength to me, who held him most dear. The buildings 
constructed under his supervision are monuments of worth and one 
located in every section of Provo. Schoolhouses , churches , places of 
business, libraries and homes are standing to his credit in Manti, 
Roosevelt, Tooele, Davis County, Delta, Ogden, Salt Lake, Springville, 
Spanish Fork, Eureka, all in his own State. Also he has monuments 
in Colorado, California and Idaho." So wrote his wife Etta Danger - 
field Dixon. She also left the following thoughts to her posterity: 
TO MY SONS: 

"Do you know that your soul is of my soul, such a part 

That you seem to be fiber and core of my heart; 
No other can pain me as you boys can 

No other can praise me and please me as you can. 
Remember the world is quick with its blame, 

If shadow or sin ever darkens your name. 
Like mother like son is a saying so true 

That the world will judge largely of mother by you. 
So be it your task, if a task it must be 

To force the proud world to pay homage to me 
And when I am gone and the battle you've won, 

They will say, "She reaped as she sowed, 
Lo! these are her sons." 

TO ALL HER GIRL POSTERITY: (Her own thoughts) 
May sunny paths dear daughters, 

Be those that you shall tread, 
With love and laughter leading 

To happiness a head. 
May all life's dearest blessings 

Be yours to have and see 
And all your days as happy 

As you are dear to me. 
My one fond hope for you dear girls 

Is that you'll always be 
As clean and good and sweet and dear 

As mother would have you be. 
So before you step to do the thing 

That conscience says "beware" 
Just stop and think and answer this 

"Would Mother care? " 



PARLEY S. DIXON FAMILY 

Front L to R: Anna, Etta D., Bert, Parley, 

Inez. 

Back L to R : Eugene, Vernon, Afton, Reed. 




HOME at 191 North Third West 
Provo, Utah 



LE ROY DIXON 
1361 -1926 




Electa Sraoot Dixon 



LE ROY DIXON 
By Sarah Dixon Summerhays 

"Senator LeRoy Dixon passed away Tuesday afternoon, December 
28, 1926 at 4 o'clock at his home, 418 North 5th West Street. Although 
it had been known for several days that his condition was critical and 
that little hope was held for his recovery, the demise of Senator Dixon 
came as a shock to the entire city, county and state". - - - So stated 
the Provo Herald Newspaper of Provo, Utah. 

Father was just forty-five years of age when he died. His illness 
began with neuritis in the face. It was first thought that it was caused 
from a bad tooth. When there was no improvement following the re- 
moval of the tooth, several more teeth were extracted. The infection 
from the teeth spread through his body quickly, making the condition 
serious from the start. Pneumonia set in a week prior to his death. 

During his illness people from all parts of the state inquired con- 
cerning his condition. His long association with public affairs of the 
city, county and state gained friends for him all over the area. Trib- 
utes paid to him, in every instance, respected the fact that he was a 
tireless and fearless in his fight for right and progress. Everywhere 
friends and co-workers eulogized him by agreeing he lived life too 
strenuously, filling his short years with "twice a life". They noted 
his kindness, unselfishness and honesty. Among the many tributes, 
resolutions and editorials published was a verse written by J. A. 
Owens, which characterizes the feeling towards LeRoy Dixon: 

He was my friend. I loved him as I love a brother. 

What ere my need of council or material aid 

He gave it freely, nor questioned why, 

But only asked that there be need of his attention. 

None came to him in need and went away uncared for . . . 

I cannot understand why one so young 

And yet withal so great, should be called from us. 

Nor can I question that great power 

Who controls destinies of men. 

And though it seems unkind, yet we must not complain nor murmur. 
Perhaps there's need of him where dwells the spirits of departed 
God may have looked and bade compassion for his loved ones, 
Yet recognizing need still thought it best to call him. 
He was my friend, and yours; We loved him. 
And because of his association we are the better. 
His life, his work, his memory are remaining for our guidance. 
Peace to his soul, and joy to ours 

That we knew and loved him while he dwelt among us. 



237 



238 



LE ROY DIXON 



CHARACTERISTICS OF LE ROY DIXON: 

From the day LeRoy Dixon was born to Sarah DeGrey and Henry 
Aldous Dixon, October 16, 1881, in Salt Lake City, Utah, he was des- 
tined to be a friend and benafactor to mankind. 

Born into a humble home and large family, he was surrounded 
with a love and loyalty to one another seldom equaled. They were, of 
necessity, required to work hard; to share and help each other. Many 
exciting tales have we heard . . .tales of their perilous trips into the 
canyons east of Provo to bring logs down. Their encounters with ani- 
mals, storms, slides, etc. were fascinating to us who were privileged 
to sit around campfires at beloved Wildwood, Provo Canyon. 

Wildwood can't be separated from LeRoy's life. He loved the 
mountains, streams and waterfalls. A familiar sight was "Uncle Roy" 
leading groups of young folks up the trails of Timpanogos, or to the 
beautiful "Left Hand Falls", or to Scott's Hollow, etc. etc. 

He was a very strong swimmer, exploring the swimming hole in 
Provo River each June before the children braved the current, show- 
ing us where the large rocks and undercurrents were. 

He loved sports, especailly tennis, handball and swimming. We 
all worked hard, rolling the tennis court at Wildwood, patching the 
net, etc. He loved to play tennis with young folks as well as adults. 
He was instrumental in encouraging many who achieved great heights 
in the sport. 

Hunting was a favorite sport, much to the concern of his wife, 
Electa. He took one hunting trip, returning home without his deer. 
He found, instead, a real "dear" had arrived before the expected time. 
( a darling baby girl). He was overjoyed, but never quite got over his 
dismay at being away at such a crucial time. 

Daddy used to help children learn to swim in the old North Park 
Swimming Pool. Trips to Schneitter's and Luke's Hot Pots were real 
highlights for us. He'd have us hold tightly to his swimming suit shoul- 
der straps (which style was worn in his day) then he'd take us sailing 
through the water on his back. He, however, was never able to teach 
his sweetheart, Electa, to swim. The nearest she ever came to stay- 
ing "afloat" was having Daddy hold a finger under her chin. With that 
assurance she managed to float like a cork. But take away the finger, 
and she would sink like a rock. She finally decided to leave the swim- 
ming to Roy and spend her time in the "shallow end" holding the babies 
near the warm water spout. How it helped her rheumatism. 

Everyone who knew LeRoy Dixon spoke of his unselfishness. He 
and Mother were the perfect example of hospitality. As far back as 
my memory goes, I knew our home to have "guests". Grandmother 
Dixon (Sarah DeGrey) was an important part of our family and home. 



LE ROY DIXON 



239 



Many English converts came to our home, staying until they were able 
to make homes for themselves. Three choice English "sisters" made 
a permanent home with us until marriage took two of them: Lily Owen 
(Bushman) and Elsie C. Ross (Whittaker). The remaining sister of 
Lily, Eliza Ann Clarkson, (Aunt Lizzie to us), stayed on with us and 
was a devoted, faithful, loving member of our family for many years. 
Vivian Hastings Kerr was another "member" of our family, having 
come to help mother and becoming as a daughter to LeRoy and Electa. 

At times of stress they would often come to Daddy for advice. He 
many times would offer such sage remarks as "forget it!" or "keep 
smiling ! " 

With these, plus many more personalities in our home, I never 
knew it to be anything but a haven of love, respect, fun and spiritual- 
ity. Prayer and faith were a part of home. When dinner was set, the 
chairs were automatically placed with the back to the table, ready for 
family prayer. 

A few years prior to Daddy's death, the Brigham Young University 
asked certain citizens to allow students to live in their homes while 
attending school. Mother and Daddy decided to openiour home. We 
had the privilege of having some very wonderful boys live with us. As 
I recall, for thirty dollars a month, Mother began housing, cooking, 
washing, ironing and mending for them. Father felt Paul, our only 
living brother among five sisters, needed some male company. 

Daddy was a favorite among the very young. A familiar sight was 
to see him balancing children above his head, doing gymnastics with 
them, bending backwards to pick up objects from our adored "kittyrug" 
( a captured wildcat skin), playing games with us, tickling and count- 
ing "ribs", etc. 

In short, among the many qualities he possessed were fun, optimism, 
kindness, unselfishness, adventure, courage, sportsmanship, faith , 
love, honesty and spirituality. 

ACTIVITIES AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF LE ROY DIXON: 

LeRoy Dixon spent practically all of his life in Provo City, Utah, 
having been born, however , in Salt Lake City. He attended city schools 
and the B. Y. Academy until 1898. 

He married Electa LaPrele Smoot on August 26, 1903 in the Salt 
Lake Temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. They 
were blessed with eight children: LeRoy II (who died at six weeks), 
Paul Smoot, Allie, Sarah Vera, Maurine, Helen, Arthur (Who died at 
four years of age), and Gladys. 

In 1906 LeRoy was called to serve a mission to England for the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. This was a real challenge 



240 



LE ROY DIXON 



to Roy and Electa. Without hesitation they sold their newly acquired 
farm to raise funds for the mission. Mother and baby Paul lived with 
Grandma Dixon. 

During the mission term, Mother and Grandma secretly, worked 
towards a real goal. Grandma tended Paul while Mother completed a 
home nursing course, after which she took "cases". By this means 
she saved enough money to take Grandmother and herself to England 
to surprise Daddy. Aunt Allie Smoot Coleman cared for Paul while 
they were gone. 

They left three months before Daddy's release. Grandmother vis- 
ited Dudley, her old home. Mother completed a short term mission. 
Together they all visited many places. 

On their return home, Mother was pregnant with Allie. She was 
desperately ill with nausea. Nothing seemed to help her. Finally the 
steward suggested champagne, apologizing because he realized the 
Mormon Elders disapproved. In desperation champagne was finally 
tried. It proved so successful it was used often. (Much to the dismay 
of a "poor" Elder's flat pocketbook). By the way, Allie was known as 
the "champagne baby". 

Prior to Daddy's mission he had worked at Taylor Bros. Co. as a 
piano tuner, and in 1904 he became interested in real estate and loan 
business. 

Upon his return from his mission he organized the Dixon Real 
Estate Co. with J. Elmer Jacobsen as his partner. He directed this 
business until he died. 

He was very civic minded and became very interested and active 
in public affairs. In 1911 he was elected to the City Council of Provo 
and served for six years. When the Commission form of government 
was instituted in Provo, he was elected Mayor in 1917. He served as 
Mayor until 1921. His second year in public affairs brought him rec- 
ognition from the Utah State Municipal League, which named him vice 
president in 1912 and from then until his death kept him a member of 
the legislative committee. 

In 1922 he was elected to the State Senate where he took an active 
part in the 1923 and 1925 sessions. His dedicated work for prohibition 
was noted. His work during those sessions was mainly responsible for 
his re-election in November 1926. The Provo Herald newspaper stat- 
ed he was prominently mentioned in connection with the presidency of 
the State Senate. 

In 1905 he became one of the incorporators of the Provo Ice and 
Cold Storage Co. and served as President continiously. (How I recall 
the fun we had when Daddy would let us go with him into the frosty, icy 
storage rooms of the ice plant and also watch how the ice blocks were 
made and moved. ) He was a director of the Blue Cliff Canal for four 



LE ROY DIXON 



241 



years; secretary of Utah Lake Land Owners Association. We used to 
kid and joke with Dad about his farm "Skipper Bay','mostly under water; 
the South Fork Cattle Co. , and the Skipper Bay Drainage Association. 
During the 1920 June flood, Daddy risked his life stretching wire ac- 
ross Provo River, backing up the flood waters to save the land. He 
was an incorporator and appraiser of the Provo Building and Loan 
Association; and a Director of the American Building & Loan Co. 

His activities also placed him prominently in several other org- 
anizations of the State. During 1923 he was President of the Utah 
State Realtor's Association. In that organization he was the donor of 
a silver loving cup annually to the member of the organization who 
could give the best five minute talk about his home city. Daddy was 
always trying to build community pride. 

For several years he had been President of the Utah County Tax- 
payers' Association. Since 1913 he had been Treasurer of the Provo 
City Board of Education. 

He served in military as well as Scout circles for many years. 
At his funeral the cortege passed between rows of scouts in uniform 
standing at attention. 

The desk he occupied in the State Senate was draped with a large 
United States flag. Governor Dern sent Mother a picture of it, stat- 
ing that Father's desk would thus be honored for the balance of the 
session. Many honors were bestowed upon him. 

In a spiritual way he was always active in the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter Day Saints. He advanced in the Priesthood to the 
calling of High Priest. He served in many capacities besides a mis- 
sion to Great Britain. He was a member of the Utah Stake High Coun- 
cil at the time of his death. 

He had great faith in his fellowmen and his Country. He was a 
devoted Latter Day Saint. He was at the "Peak" when he was stricken 
at the young age of 45 years. The world held great promise for him. 
He loved all that was good and beautiful, and was deeply loved in re- 
turn. 



TRIBUTES TO LE ROY DIXON 



Mayor O. K. Hansen: 

11 If the saying is true that a person gets out of life what he puts in- 
to it, Senator Dixon must have lived a full and complete life. Few 
men put as much energy, time, money and interest into community 
work as did he. He may well be classified among those who used their 
talents to the utmost. It might even be said that he was possibly too 
zealous in trying to consummate his ideals. This zeal may have over- 
taxed his energy, but his temperament was such that work in hand 
must be finished and finished as nearly right as possible." 

" Provo owes much to Mr. Dixon. All through the years of city 
service, he was found fighting for our interests, moral, economic 
and social. While some others faltered, he fought on unwilling always 
to compromise with evil or wrong. As a result we are enjoying many 
blessings that otherwise would not have been ours. " 

W. R. Butler, Director of Provo Chamber of Commerce: 

" In the passing of LeRoy Dixon our city and county loses a true 
friend, a man of state-wide experience, an indefatigable worker for 
the interests of the community, a man with a cheery smile and kind 
word for every one and whose word was as good as his bond. If the 
world were made up of men of his type, it would truly be a good world 
to live in. " 

Alonzo B. Irvine, President of the State Senate in 1 925 : 

" Senator Dixon was one of the best men in the State Senate - - 
conscientious and untiring in his efforts to serve the commonwealth." 

T. N. Taylor, President of Utah Stake: 

" In the passing of LeRoy Dixon the state and church have lost a 
man who stood for the highest ideals. He was tender, sympathetic, gen- 
erous, clean in thought and act and fearless in the defense of the right. 
He was as true and dependable a human being could be, a loyal and 
loving friend, a sweet and devoted neighbor. His integrity has never 
been questioned. He was tender--yes, tender as a child, always sweet 
and smiling, always playful and ready to cheer the children with his 
play. But when it came to standing for a principle, he never wavered. " 

Thomas E. McKay, Former President of the Utah State Senate: 
"Senator Dixon was an untiring worker always willing to sacrifice 
his own interests for the welfare of the public. He was never to busy 
with his own affairs for the public good. But he has been called home. 
Senator Dixon was needed in some other place. LeRoy Dixon is not 
dead. He has just gone home. His place of work has been changed. 
God bless the memory of LeRoy Dixon. He served the people well." 



242 



Biographical Sketch of 



LE ROY DIXON 
From History of Utah Since Statehood 

Le Roy Dixon is Mayor of Provo, giving to the City a business 
like and progressive administration. He is a the same time promin- 
ently connected with business affairs and is the President of the Provo 
Ice and Cold Storage Company. He was born October 16, 1881, in the 
City which is still his home (correction. He was born in Salt Lake 
City) and thus his life record stands in contradiction to the old adage 
that a prophet is never without honor save in his own country. 

Le Roy Dixon, after mastering the branches of learning taught in 
the Public Schools of Provo, continued his education in the Brigham 
Young Academy, now the Brigham Young University, where he remain- 
ed a student until 1898. In the school of experience he has also learn- 
ed many valuable lessons and he early developed a persistency of pur- 
pose and strength of character that have constituted dominant factors 
in the attainment of his present day success and prominence. 

After leaving the Academy he entered the employ of the Taylor 
Bros. Co. , owners of the largest department store of Provo. He re- 
mained with that house in various departments until 1904, when in 
association with Wm. H. Ray and others, he organized the firm of 
W. H. Ray & Co., Inc. They became extensive dealers in real estate 
and loans and Mr. Dixon continued successfully in that association 
until 1906 when he was called upon to fill a mission for the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in England. He therefore went ab- 
road and labored successfully in Great Britain for two years, spend- 
ing his time in Birmingham with good results. Upon his return to his 
native country, he established his present real estate business under 
the style of the Dixon Real Estate Co. This was a partnership concern, 
his associate being J. Elmer Jacobsen, with whom he is still connect- 
ed. They have their offices in the Farmers & Merchants Bank Build- 
ing and do a very large business, handling all kinds of realty, and en- 
joying a large clientage. Mr. Dixon is thoroughly familiar with the 
property values in this part of the State, this however constitutes but 
one phase of his activity. He is interested in reclamation and develop- 
ment work, notably in the Uinta Basin. He is engaged in draining and 
reclaiming lowlands in the vicinity of Utah Lake adjoining Provo. This 
will be converted into valuable property and Mr. Dixon is well known 
as a member of the Utah Lake Land Owners Association. He is like- 
wise the President of the Provo Ice and Cold Storage Co. and is most 
alert, progressive and energetic young business man, carrying for- 
ward to successful completion whatever he undertakes. 

On the 19th of August 1903, Mr. Dixon was married to Miss 



243 



244 



LE ROY DIXON 



Electa Smoot, a daughter of A. O. Smoot a member of the First Leg- 
islative Assembly of Utah, and a brother of Senator Reed Smoot. His 
ancestors were among the honored pioneer residents of the State. 

Mr. & Mrs. Dixon have six living children, and lost one son, 
Le Roy, their first born, who died when but six years old. The others 
are: Paul, now attending the Brigham Young University; Allie and 
Sarah, in school; Maurine, Helen and Arthur. 

Mr. Dixon has been a member of the Provo Commercial Club 
since its organization and has taken a deep interest in promoting its 
work, for its objective is the upbuilding of the City, the development 
of its business connections, and the upholding of its civic standards. 
He has always taken a keen and helpful interest in everything pertain- 
ing to the welfare of Provo and in 1911 was elected a City Commission- 
er on a non-partisian ticket. Where national questions and issues are 
involved he gives his allegiances to the Republican Party. 

1913 endorsement of his first terms service as City Commis- 
sioner came a re-election for a four years' term. He is an officer of 
the State Municipal League, so serving since 1912 and he is on its leg- 
islative committee. 

In 1917 he was elected to the office of Mayor of the City, succeed- 
ing J. E. Daniels, and his administration is evoking much favorable 
comment, for he is devoting much of his time to the duties of the pos- 
ition and brings to bear the same splendid qualifications that have won 
him success in business. He is active in the work of the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, being now a high councellor. He 
was President of the Young Mens Mutual Improvement Association for 
a number of years and went on a successful mission to England. 

His activities have been of a broad and varied character, contrib- 
uting in a sustantial measure to the upbuilding and development of 
community and State along material, political, social and moral lines. 

He is actuated in all that he does by a spirit of advancement, pro- 
ductive of splendid results and in his work, whether for his individual 
interests or for the City's upbuilding, he looks beyond the exigencies 
of the moments to the opportunities and possibilities of the future and 
labors not only for the present but for the welfare of generations to 
come. His genuine personal worth is attested by all who know him 
and his circle of friends is almost co-estensive with the circle of his 
acquaintance. 




Home at 418 North Fifth l"/dst 
ProvOj Utah 



HARRIET DIXON WEST 
1832 - 1931 




George h. West 



HARRIET DIXON WEST 



By Vest Dixon Booth 
Given at the Dixon Cousins Club Banquet at the Lion House in 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

I don't know very much about Aunt Hattie West, but as you all 
know she lived in California and she had the red hair of the Dixon 
family. 

I was born June 10 at San Pedro, California, my grandmother, 
Mary Smith Dixon, died on June 27 of this same year. I was just 
seventeen days old when she died, so I was never fortunate enough to 
see her. After her funeral and all of her personal affairs were taken 
care of, Aunt Hattie came down to California with Annie Frisby, some 
of you remember her as Annie Ritchie. They stayed at our place for 
awhile and then went to visit relatives of Annie Ritchie. She had been 
away from our place about three weeks, when Dad received word from 
her that she was married. You can imagine how he felt. He left im- 
mediately to go to the town she and her husband were living at, which 
was quite a distance from San Pedro. As he was walking down the 
street, he decided he would inquire as to who this George West was 
that his sister had married. The first man he talked to said, "You 
see that Bank on the corner, his name is just as good as that Bank". 
After meeting and talking with several people and receiving the same 
good report, he felt a lot better. As he came to their house, Aunt 
Hattie came running out in tears and crying. Dad said to her, "What's 
he done to you, let me at him". Aunt Hattie said, "No, he is a won- 
derful man and I am really happy". She just felt bad in seeing him 
for the first time since her marriage. 

I have heard my Dad many time say that Uncle George was a 
wonderful man and he never knew a finer man than he was and he 
thought so much of him. 

I can say too that Uncle George was a wonderful man, for in the 
summer when I was about eighteen, I went down to California and 
stayed with them for about four or five months. I really learned to 
love both of them and truly thought they were wonderful. 

They only had one son, Lynn. Many of you will remember him. 
He was married at this time. Aunt Hattie had been bedfast for more 
than eight years, when I was with them. Aunt Hattie didn't get dis- 
heartened like so many sick people do, but she still had hope that 
she would get better. She was always talking about when she could 
get up and what she was going to do. 

While I was there I made a dress for her. To try it on, Uncle 
George would get her out of bed and hold her up while I would try the 
dress on her. She did finally get up and was up for quite a few years 
before she died. 



245 



246 



HARRIET DIXON WEST 



I remember how good they were to the missionaries when they 
came to their place. Every time they came they never went away with 
out Uncle George giving them some money. He always helped them 
out and they even came to borrow his car when they were going to the 
outlying districts to tract or visit. 

Aunt Hattie had great faith. Whenever she had a very bad spell 
she would have the missionaries come and administer to her and she 
would get better immediately. 

She loved children and she had a lot of friends, like all the other 
Dixons. They lived at San Bernadino, but in the summer they would 
go to their Beach Cottage at Seal Beach. She had just as many friends 
and neighbors at the Beach as she had at home. She was a wonderful 
lady. 



(Copied from the Deseret News) 
HATTIE DIXON WEST 

Provo - April 25, 1931 - Word was received in Provo, Friday of 
the death of Mrs. Hattie Dixon West, former Provo Woman, and wife 
of George W. West of San Bernardino, California. The death occured 
April 23, 1931, Thursday, at the family home from the effects of a 
paralytic stroke which she suffered two weeks ago. 

She was born in Provo, May 24, 1882, the daughter of the late 
Henry A. and Mary S. Dixon. She lived here until her marriage to 
George W. West of San Bernardino in 1907, when she returned to the 
West Coast with her husband. 

Surviving are her husband; one son, Lynn D. West; two grand- 
children and the following brothers and sisters: William A. , Albert 
F. , Charles O. , Arnold, Ernest, and Parley Dixon all of Provo;Mrs. 
J. W. Dangerfield and Mrs. Arthur N. Taylor, of Provo, and Mrs. 
A. C. Mc Conachie of Salt Lake. 

Funeral services will be held in San Bernardino. 



Harriet D. West 



George W. West 




Albert Dixon, Hattie D« West, Mrs, Collard (Nurse), 
Baby Lynn West, George W. West, Albert Choules 




George W. West & son Lynn 



ARNOLD DIXON 
1884 - I960 





May BanKs lixon 



Autobiography of ARNOLD DIXON 



I, Arnold Dixon, was born at Provo, Utah County, Utah on May 
30, 1884 in an adobe house located at the corner of Second North and 
Third West Streets. My parents were Sarah DeGrey and Henry Aldous 
Dixon. 

Soon after I reached the age of eight years I was baptized in June 
18 92 by Bishop R S. Gibby. Then I was confirmed a member of the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in June 1892 by our Bish- 
op, R. S. Gibby. I was ordained a Priest on December 8, 1904 by Al- 
fred W. Harding; a Seventy in the 123rd Quorum on November 5, 1910 
by J. Golden Kimball, and a High Priest on December 11, 1927 by J. 
William Knight. When I was sixteen years old I received a patriarchal 
blessing under the hands of Charles D. Evans on November 17, 1900. 
Even though I was quite young at the time, the blessing was a great 
guide to me. 

I received my early education in the Provo District Schools. I 
attended the B. Y. U. Preparatory School for one year, then for part 
of two years I studied bookkeeping etc. , at the B. Y. U. Commercial 
Department. The balance of my education and training was gained 
through practical experience , which included a great many hard knocks 
that I received in the varied jobs I held. 

As a small boy, I worked on the farm which gave me a foundation 
knowledge of management. I worked at a "hand made brick yard" 
until the Provo Pressed Brick Co. was organized, at which time I 
helped to install machinery and worked at a number of different mach- 
ines. Later I was the time- keeper and did some bookkeeping at the 
yard office. I worked about one year in the Provo office of the Provo 
Pressed Brick Co. with S. H. Belmont and Thomas Boardman as 
office manager and bookkeeper. I also worked for the Central Coal 
Company doing office work and unloading cars of coal. 

I worked about four years in Salt Lake City in the State Treasur- 
er's Office as secretary. The office at that time was in the Utah Nat- 
ional Bank and I did some work for the bank at the same time. In that 
way I received a considerable amount of banking experience. 

When I returned to Provo I did many odd jobs. During the sum- 
mer vacation time of the employees, I worked at the Commercial and 
Savings Bank. I also was bookkeeper for the State Bank of Provo. 

In 1906 when the Farmers and Merchants Bank was organized I 
became the bookkeeper and worked up to the position of cashier during 
the twenty- five years I worked there. I was Cashier of the Bank at 
the time it was re-organized. 

While working at the Farmers and Merchants Bank I spent one 
two week's vacation working at Hurricane where I helped organize 
the State Bank of Hurricane. I had every intention of moving to Hur- 
ricane as the cashier of the bank. I spent many nights writing letters 



247 



248 



ARNOLD DIXON 



and securing all the information I could regarding the amounts of de- 
posits in both the St. George and Cedar City banks and the number of 
residents in the towns near Hurricane. I also drew up the Articles of 
Incorporation. I was promised a charter from the State Bank Comm- 
issioner in case the bank was organized. 

When I arrived in Hurricane, my cousin Alfred Hall, and others 
were ready to subscribe the stock. Alfred and I called on Charles 
Petty, owner of the main general merchandise store, and were turned 
down cold. He informed us that a friend of his, J. W. Imlay, a big 
sheep man, was already going to open a bank. It was to be a branch 
of a new bank soon to be opened in Cedar City. I knew that could not 
be so because Mr. Imlay had no charter and branch banks were not 
allowed in Utah at that time. 

The next man we contacted was David Hirschi,who was a director 
of the St. George Bank. He felt we were foolish to try and organize a 
bank in Hurricane , because we would not be able to get enough deposits 
and would not be able to sell the needed stock. So instead of helping 
us he only tried to discourage our efforts. I knew that people in 
Provo would take what stock could not be sold in Hurricane. 

Within the next few days we had enough stock subscribed to go 
ahead with the organization of the bank. On the day I was to return to 
Provo, I again called Mr. Hirschi and urged him to become the bank 
president because of his banking experience. I bade him good bye and 
was on my way when he called me back and informed me that he would 
back the new bank, 

I gave he and Alfred Hall the necessary papers and instructions 
for the organization and left. I arrived in Provo the following day and 
talked with the Farmers and Merchants Bank officials. They offered 
me an increase in salary besides a new position if I would remain with 
them. Mr. Hirschi wrote me that he was to be president and I was to 
be cashier. So many people wanted stock that they wanted to limit the 
stock issue to five shares per person or else $500. 00. Upon hearing 
this, I then declined the offer to be cashier. I felt I would have to 
work for a small salary, and I would expect to get dividends sufficient 
to make it worth while to move to Hurricane. 

I offered to give David Hirschi 1 s son, Claude, a short training 
in our bank at Provo, so he would be able to take over the position of 
cashier. I spent considerable time in training Claude. I also ordered 
all the books and stationery and a new safe, which was too small for 
the Bingham Bank after its purchase. 

I was happy to be able to help Hurricane get their bank, which has 
been a great benefit to the community and is one of the best small 
banks in Southern Utah. 

After working in the banks I took a job with John Mans on in a 



ARNOLD DIXON 



249 



coal mine prospect at Scofield in Carbon County. I also worked for 
the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad Company Section. While working 
on the tracks, a large steel bar fell on my foot, breaking one of my 
toes. 

My next job was with the U.S. Government in the City and County 
Building as office manager for the R.F. C. for Utah County. I worked 
at this job for about one year but had to resign because of ill health. 
After I had regained my health, I secured a position with B. D. Palf- 
reyman Construction Company as office manager where I set up a new 
bookkeeping system for the Company. I also worked for the Dixon 
Real Estate Company for about three years as bookkeeper. 

I was employed by the Columbia Steel Company as an Auditor dur- 
ing the construction of the Geneva Steel Plant. I was unemployed for 
the next few months, so I took a much needed rest. I occupied my 
time in caring for my garden and home. 

I was next employed by the Dixon Taylor Russell Company setting 
up furniture. I had no desire for office work, so I enjoyed the work 
in the furniture department. This pleasant change lasted about three 
months when the manager asked me to assist in the office for a short 
while. However, after a month in the office I was given the job of 
auditing all the branch store books each month. I had seven stores 
to take care of and I was out of town quite a bit and was quite busy. I 
have been with this Company over three years and expect to remain as 
long as my health will permit. 

Despite the fact that my life appears to be full of banking and 
bookkeeping, I never-the-less , had time for my family, home and 
Church. In 1911, on November 15th, I married a lovely young girl by 
the name of Letitia May Banks, in the Salt Lake Temple. The cerem- 
ony was performed byAdolphus Madsen and we were a very happy young 
couple that day. We made our home in Provo and to us were born ten 
fine sons and daughters - seven sons and three daughters - namely: 

Howard Banks, born December 11, 1912, who married Fulvia 
Call. 

Evelyn, born May 30, 1917, who married Donald H. Smith. 
Grant DeGrey, born April 11, 1919, and Married Florence Rose 
Marks . 

Eldon Arnold, born on March 31, 1921, who married Sarah Jean 
Dastrup. 

Bruce Royden, born February 13, 1923. (Married Colleen 
Callister . ) 

Floyd Preston, born on November 6, 1924, on a mission in 

Mexico. ( Married Lois Mai Dickenson). 
Gloria May, born on December 1, 1926, married Thomas W. 

Richardson. 



ARNOLD DIXON 



Robert Norman, born May 15, 1930. Will marry Genniel Larsen 

on April 5, 1951. 
Douglas Wayne, who was born on May 15, 1932. (Married Helen 

Konapelski). 

Doris Ann, born on March 19, 1934. (Married Bruce J. Christ- 
ensen. ) 

I have tried to fulfil each call which has come to me in my Church. 
I was Ward Clerk for five years in the Provo Third Ward; treasurer of 
the Third Ward Missionary Committee for a number of years. I was 
Ward Teacher in the Provo Fifth Ward for five years, Ward Teacher 
in the 30th Ward in Salt Lake City for two years and held the same 
calling in the Provo Third Ward for ten years. I always received 
much joy in doing this type of work, because I like to meet and con- 
verse with people. 

I am grateful to my Father in Heaven for the privilege of coming 
to this earth, of marrying one of the best young women of this world 
and for the ten fine children she has born unto me. I have a number 
of wonderful grandchildren of which I am mighty proud. My wife and 
I surely appreciate our family and desire to live long enough to see 
them all married and have families of their own. 

This is a history of my life to this date, February 25, 1951. 



( Arnold Dixon died at the Utah Valley Hospital on Thursday eve- 
ning, September 1, I960.) 



ARNOLD DIXON FAMILY 



Front L to R: Douglas W., Arnold, 
Doris, May B., Robert N . 

Back L to R: Bruce R., Grant D., 
Evelyn, Eldon A., Howard B., 
Floyd P., Gloria. 




HOME at 270 No. 5th West 
Provo, Utah 



NEILS RASMUSSEN 
1854 - 19U 




Biography of NIELS RASMUSSEN 
By Annie Eliza Rasmussen 

Niels Rasmussen, the son of Henrich Rasmussen and Rebecca 
Hansen, was born May 29, 1854 in the town of Maderup, the parish of 
Saerslev, Odnese, Denmark, and was the fourth of six children. His 
father was an expert weaver, but Niels said, 11 poor in this world's 
goods". 

When his son, Alma, was on a mission to Denmark, he met neigh- 
bors of the Rasmussen family. They remembered the family well, 
and said, "When Niels was five years old, his father was very proud 
of his singing. When visitors came to the house, his father stood him 
on the table and he sang for the company". 

When seven years old, Niels went to school three days of the week, 
and in the summer herded cows and sheep for farmers in the vicinity 
the other four days. 

When he was nine years old, his father died, leaving his mother 
with six children to support. She worked hard, and since she had 
joined the Church, her greatest desire was to join the Saints in the 
Rocky Mountains. 

In 1866, three years after the death of her husband, his mother 
succeeded in raising enough money to take them to Utah. On May 10, 
1866, in company with a number of other neighbors, who had also 
joined the Church, they left all that was near and dear to them - - - - 
relatives, friends, associates, and their home . Included in the rela- 
tives was his maternal grandmother who was then 81 years of age. 
He disliked very much leaving her behind. 

They arrived in Copenhagen on May 11th, and had to stay about 
two weeks. On May 28th, they left Copenhagen on the steamship, 
Aurora, for Kiel, Germany, and arrived there the next day. They 
left Kiel for Hamburg, Germany, and set sail on the sailing vessel, 
Cavious, May 29th, his twelth birthday anniversary, bound for New 
York. 

They arrived in New York after a tedious voyage of nine weeks 
and three days, due to bad winds. They stopped at Castle Gardens, 
an old theatre used for emigration purposes, a few hours and then set 
sail on an American River steamer for Albany. They sailed all night 
and in the morning they boarded a train for the West. 

About this time cholera had begun to appear and several people 
had died of the dreaded disease. It continued to spread at a "terrible 
rate of slaughter" on the railroad. It was no re spector of persons, 
as "men in their prime of life and apparently hale and hearty were 
stricken down, never to rise again." 

When they reached St. Joseph, Missouri, they sailed up the Mis- 
souri to Wyoming. Out of the company, numbering two hundred and 
eighty souls, eighty of all ages had died. 



251 



252 



NIELS RASMUSSEN 



They arrived in Wyoming and stayed there for two days, and then 
started for Utah. 

His only brother, Peter, nineteen years of age, took sick with the 
cholera and suffered "the most terrible pain and excruciating torture. " 
"It was heart rending to hear him cry in his agony", said Niels. His 
mother grieved about Peter. She waited on him and did all she could 
to alleviate his suffering, until she took sick with the cholera. Peter 
died and a few days later his mother followed him. 

The oldest daughter, who was sixteen felt bad because of the death 
of her mother. Her mother was permitted to come back and speak to 
this daughter and said, "I can't stay long. I have to go back. It is a 
beautiful place on the other side. If I had known that it was such a 
beautiful place, I would not have mourned for my son. Never leave 
the Church. It is the true Church. Take care of your brother and 
siste rs". 

Like the other dead, his mother and brother were buried in a 
shallow grave by the roadside, after being sewed up in a sheet. They 
did not have the privilege of seeing Utah, their greatest desire. 

The family traveled in the ill-fated company in charge of Captain 
Abner Lowry, who was ably assisted by Brother George Farnsworth 
of Mt. Pleasant, Utah. Niels said, "We will never forget the untiring 
efforts of Brother Farnsworth in alleviating the sufferings of those af- 
flicted with cholera". 

A relief mule train, under Captain Arza E. Hinckley, sent out by 
President Brigham Young, met them about four hundred miles east of 
Salt Lake City. All the orphans, of which there were many, were 
taken by that mule train. 

Included in the orphans were Niels and his four sister. They 
arrived in Salt Lake October 8th, 1866, while the main Company, 
which lost nearly all of their cattle in the snow in the mountains, reach- 
ed the valley two weeks later, October 22, 1866. 

The day after their arrival in Salt Lake City, the orphans were 
provided with homes. Niels and his oldest sister were taken care of 
by Brother Orson P. Miles and family of the Eighth Ward. Niels lived 
there until the following March 1867,' when he was taken to the home 
of Henry A. Dixon of the Eleventh Ward, who later moved to Provo. 
Here he stayed about one and a half years. 

Nicoline, 14 years of age, and Mary 7 years of age, were placed 
in the home of C. W. Hostmark, and Annie, nine years of age was 
placed in the home of Carl Larsen, where she remained until her ac- 
cidental death May 30, 1867. She went to get a bucket of water in 
City Creek and was dragged into the creek by the strong current and 
drowned. 

Niels returned to Salt Lake on a visit, and while here, he was 



NIELS RASMUSSEN 



253 



offered a position in the General Tithing Store by Bishop Edward 
Hunter and Joseph C. Kingsbury. Later he was the bookkeeper in the 
Presiding Bishop's Office and was employed until March 31, 1909. 

In 1878 he filled a short-term mission in the United States, lab- 
oring principally in Nebraska and Iowa from May 7, to December 20, 
1878. 

He was active in the Church. In the First Ward he was Ward 
Clerk for a number of year s , Superintendent of the Sunday School from 
December 1886 to 1901, Second Counselor to Bishop Joseph Warburton 
from October 27, 1897 to June 1, 1 909 when the Ward was divided, 
forming Emigration Ward. 

He married Laura A. M. Thorup September 1 1, 1879 and Christ- 
ine V. Thorup November 21, 1885, devoted sisters. He was the 
father of thirteen children, three sons and ten daughters. 

He was a lover of music and gave his children a musical education. 
He played the violin and loved to sing the songs of Zion. One of his 
favorite songs was " O Ye Mountains High". 

For a number of years, Niels studied how to become a dry farmer, 
so when he left the Presiding Bishop's Office in March 1909, he began 
dry farming in Welby, Utah, and made a success of it. All the farmers 
of long standing said he taught them how to become succe ssful dry farm- 
ers. 

He died March 6, 1914, in Salt Lake City, Utah at the age of 5 9 
years, 9 months and 8 days. He was the last survivor of his father's 
family and lived a busy and useful life. 



Written: March 10, 1940 



SARAH BARRETT MONK 



A Dixon Family History would be incomplete without the inclusion 
of Aunt Sarah Monk. As a practical nurse, she attended the birth of 
the majority of Grandfather H. A. Dixon's grandchildren. Not only 
was she the nurse attending the mother, but she assumed the respon- 
sibilities of housekeeper and "acting" mother to all the children in the 
home . 

Aunt Sarah retained the English accent in her speech all of her 
life. She liked to talk and had very many interesting and unusual ex- 
periences to relate. She captivated her young listeners with her stories 
of England and her variety of pioneer experiences since coming to this 
country. She was very efficient and brought a sweet, pleasant and 
peaceful atmosphere into the home. We all loved Aunt Sarah Monk. 
Her picture is found opposite page 90. 

Aunt Sarah Monk's father, William Barrett, migrated from Ponty 
Pool, Monmouthshire, England in 1874. Due to his advanced age when 
he arrived in this Country, and the handicap of losing one of his limbs, 
made it very difficult for him to make a living and provide for his family. 
Grandfather Dixon moved a log house onto his lot at Third West and 
Second North, Provo, Utah; especially for the Barrett Family. Here on 
the same lot as his other two houses, he would be close enough to pro - 
vide help when necessary. 

William Barrett died March 4, 1883 at the age of 82 years, just 
a year prior to Grandfather H. A. Dixon's death. He left a wife and 
13 children. 

Grandma Barrett continued to live in this log house for the remain- 
der of her life. A picture of this log house with Grandma Barrett and 
3 young boys, namely, Aldous Dixon, Arthur D. Taylor and Elmo 
Cunningham, is found on Page 90 of this book. 

Aunt Sarah Monk was born August 2, 1856 in Ponty Pool, England, 
the daughter of William and Phoebe Calbourn Barrett. She was just 
18 years of age when she migrated to this Country with her parents. 
She married Charles Monk on July 13, 1877 in the St. George Temple. 
They lived in Spanish Fork for several years after their marriage. 
She had one son and four daughters. George Monk, Phoebe Monk Brill, 
Millie Monk Pickett, Sophia Monk Bo shard, and Fern Monk Maughan. 
Sarah Barrett Monk was 78 years of age when she died at her home at 
258 West Fourth North, Provo, Utah. 



254 



DIXON SISTER 1 S CLUB 




Louie M. Dixon 



Sarah D. McConachie 



Etta D. Dixon 



DIXON SISTER 1 S CLUB 






DIXON SISTERS CLUB 



"Who are the Sisters and who are the Sister-in-laws? " was a 
question asked by an invited guest to one of the monthly Dixon Sisters 
social. 

The Dixon Sisters and Sister- in- laws affection for each other was 
so great and they wanted so much to enjoy each others company, tal- 
ents and experiences, that they set aside one day a month to meet to- 
gether. 

At the first meeting, Sarah L. Dixon was elected President, Alice 
Dixon Dangerfield, Vice-president and Fanny S. Whimpey, Secretary. 
The official name selected was "THE DIXON SISTERS CLUB". 
Members consisted of: 

Sarah Lewis Dixon Alice Dixon Dangerfield 

Catherine (Rena) M. Dixon Sarah Dixon Mc. Conachie 

Maria Dixon Taylor Sena Rasmus sen Dixon 

May Painter Dixon Hattie Hands Dixon 

Electa Smoot Dixon Etta Dangerfield Dixon 

Louie Maiben Dixon Sophia Smith Manson 

May Banks Dixon Fanny S. Whimpey 

The purpose of the Club was to meet together once a month and 
leave all family troubles at home - - -To visit while working on some 
handiwork - - -To be uplifted intellectually by a book review, a poem, 

a pioneer story, or a little "food for thought" To enjoy and laugh 

at a good joke - - -To listen and be inspired by a beautiful song - - - 
To remember and honor each other on her birthday. 

A typical afternoon's activities would unfold something like this: 

DECEMBER MINUTES 

By Fanny Whimpey, Sec. 

"The spirit of Christmas was everywhere in evidence at the Dec- 
ember meeting at Sister Rye's. Tall, red candles were at each end 
of the holly covered mantle, and the long table decorated with wild 
holly and held Santa Claus candles for favors. " 

"Dinner was served by the hostess as soon as the guests arrived, 
with the assistance of Erma Boshard and Nancy Armstrong. " 

"After dinner Rhea Reeve read a poem she had written for the 
dedication of an old Elm tree on 3rd West by the Daughters of Pioneers. 
The poem contained the history of Grandfather Dixon, who planted the 
Elm tree. Also the history of his family, who had lived in the house 
in front of which the Elm tree stands. " 

"Nancy Armstrong read the story "White Christmas" by Fannie 
Hurst; also a stirring war poem brought by Sister Sophia. " 

"Chinese checkers was indulged in by a few but talking was far 
more important than games. " 

"Sister May P. has long been occupied with a luncheon cloth and 



255 



256 



DIXON SISTERS CLUB 



to-day it is missing. She states it is finished and while we are not 
doubting Thomas' we feel we are entitled to a look at the completed 
work - - -all smooth and neatly folded - - -after looking at it so long 
in its unfinished stages. " 

"Sister Sarah L's trade mark is her sheet. To-day she finished 
the one inch on her sheet, left over from the month before. " 

"Sister Sarah L.was the only one who really worked diligently on 
fancy work. But it had become a race against time to finish the rec- 
eiving blanket for granddaughter Dorothy's baby and whoops - - -the 
baby won, or was it a tie? " 

"Gifts for each member was exchanged. The occassion was made 
gayer by the celebration of Sister Sarah Mc's birthday. There were 
two birthday cakes, the club gift and the Happy Birthday Song, sung to 
her, to make it a joyous day." 

"An open grate fire added to the cheer of the afternoon. " 

"Just before the guests left, Sister Sarah Mc. cut and served each 
a piece of her birthday cake. " 

"Evelyn Smith was a guest and little Linda Kartchner and her new 
baby brother, Kenneth, proved to be a special added attraction. " 

Some months were suitable and adaptable for a particular theme, 
such as: 



There was also the Annual Theatre Party plus the serving a hot 
supper after the theatre. 

Many of the young Dixon brides received a wedding present from 
the Sisters Club. 

Each birthday cake had the name of the Sister written across the 
top of the cake . 

A birthday present was given in behalf of the Club. For years this 
present consisted of a pair of stockings, which was almost a luxury 
during the War years. 

From Fanny Whimpey, a hand made doily was presented to each 
of the birthday girls. 

I could never find out if a candle for each year of their age was 
placed on the birthday cake. 

Some of the impromptu stories related would be eligible for an 
"oscar award", if only they could have been captured in print, such as: 



July or August 



De cembe r 
Novembe r 



July or August 



February 
July - - - 



Christmas 

Thanksgiving 

Dixon Outdoor Reunion 

Washington's Birthday 

Party at Wildwood 

Outdoor Social - Lindon 



DIXON SISTERS CLUB 



257 



The "bed bug" story given by Sarah L. Dixon, or the story of the 
time she was trapped in a room for over an hour because the lock on 
the door was defe ctive , and how she finally went to work with "women's 
weapon", a hair pin, and rescued herself. "It's good we women are 
around with hairpins and that Sister Sarah knew how to manipulate one, 
for the experience could have been disastrous. " 

"Embarasing Moments" as related in one session bySisters Rena, 
Fanny, Sarah Mc. , Sarah L. , Louie and Etta; must have been classics. 

Activity in the Dixon Sisters Club continued until there were only 
three members left - Rena Dixon, Louie Dixon and Fanny Whimpey. 
All the rest having passed on. Each month it became harder to meet 
together so the DIXON SISTERS CLUB was officially discontinued in 
1962. 

A new organization consisting of "DIXON COUSINS" has sprung 
up to take over where the Sisters left off. 



»" THE SISTER - IN - LAW'S CLUB " 
Rhea Dixon Reeve 

There are Clubs of wealth and prestige 

With members of high degree, 

There are Civic Clubs and Study Clubs 

Thru- out this land and o'er the sea. 

Literary Clubs with book reviews 

Political Clubs discussing the news, 

Sewing Clubs, who stitch and chatter, 

Better-ment Leagues pointing out what's the matter. 

Clubs made up of Spinsters, 

And Bachelor Clubs too, 

Sister-in-law Clubs are very rare, 

The ideas very new. 

So here's an orchid to your Club 

Altho you number such a few, 

If I'd travel the wide world over, 

I couldn't find choice women like you. 

I'm very partial to your Club, 

I like your unselfish creed 

"One for all and All for one!" 

You're right there, in times of need. 

I admire your attitude, 

To always pleasant be 

Laugh and chat, about this and that 

The good things always see. 



258 



DIXON SISTERS CLUB 



I like your members, 

You have a common cause; 

Not to out do each other 

But appreciate sister -in- laws. 

Enjoying every minute 

The little while you meet, 

No worry about entertainment, 

Seeing each other is such a treat. 

No bother about costly menus, 

Each hostess does her bit. 

Judging from my experience 

Your refreshments make a hit. 

You're all good cooks, have good looks - - - 

And live up to the standard 

Found in good books. 

You're industrious and kind, 

The best of mothers, 

Service is your slogan, 

Always thoughtful of others. 

So here's a tribute to each sister-in-law, 

May you live many useful years, 

Sharing with each other happiness, 

Giving comfort when there's tears. 



DIXON COUSINS 



This song is sung at each Dixon Reunion. 

GETTING TO KNOW YOU 

( Tune: "Getting to Know You", from "The King and I" ) 

It's a very ancient saying, but a true and honest thought, 
That if you become related, by your cousins you'll be taught. 
As a cousin I've been learning, (You'll forgive me if I boast). 
And I've now become an expert, on the subject I like most. 
Getting to know you (spoken). 

Getting to know you, getting to know all about you, 
Getting to like you, getting to hope you like me. 
Getting to know you, getting to know your connection. 
It is such fun to know our FAMILY TREE. 

Getting to know you, getting to feel free and easy, 
When I am with you, getting to know what to say. 
At these reunions, cousins become more than strange names. 
Because of all the beautiful and new things, I'm learning 
about you, year by year. 

HAPPY TALK 

(Tune: "Happy Talk" from "South Pacific". Words by Sarah Dixon 

Summe rhay s ) 

Long ago in darkest Africa, 
A wee little red-haired boy was born. 
He grew up brave and strong . . . 
He never would do wrong . . . 
Left his home to join the Pioneers. 

Talk about Granpa . . . 

Pushin' towards the West . . . 

Buildin' up his family so blest. 

Talk about his dreams . . . 

Talk about his schemes . . . 

Little did he dream we'd all be here! 

Happy talk, keep talkin! Happy talk! 
Talk about things you like to do! 
Please tell me who you are? 
And if you've come from far? 
Never, ever strangers should we be! 



260 



DIXON COUSINS 



HAPPY TALK (Con't) 

Talk about his wives . . . 

Sarah . . . Mary, dear ; 

Loving, faithful, loyal . . . always true! 

Talk about their kids . . . 

Boys and girls alike . . . 

Into Moms and Pops of ours they grew! 

Happy Talk, keep talkin' Happy Talk! 

Talk about things you used to do . . . 

Who are your Mom and Dad? 

To not know them is sad . . . 

Come on, Cous', let's get acquainted now! 

Talk about Wildwood . . . 

Cabins, fun and food . . . 

Kids a-runnin' gaily down the lane . . . 

Hiking up the hill . . . 

Bound to take a spill . . . 

Swimmin 1 with Aunt Rye in sun or rain! 

Happy Talk, keep talkin 1 ! Happy Talk! 
All of the fun we used to have . . . 
What's causin' all this buzz? 
T'is all your fault, my cous' . . . 
All these things we've never known before 
If we see each other . . . 
Aunt or uncle, cousin, brother . . . 
Let that smile and real, "HELLO" 
Come through! 

Happy Talk, keep talkin! Happy Talk! 
Talkin' bout the things we like to do . . . 
This is our happy time . . . 
Where we all feel just fine! . . . 
Cousins buzzin' 'bout their family fun! 



DIXON HERITAGE GROUP 
"DIXON COUSINS" 

By Ruth T. Kartchner 

The Dixons love to talk, and they love to talk to each other! So it 
seemed only natural that they should want to have some kind of an org- 
anization where they could see one another, catch up on the latest do- 
ings of everybody, talk and just plain enjoy themselves. Whenever a 
group of them were together, sometime, before they left, some one 
would say, "Why don't we get together more often, it's sure been fun 
talking to you". So one day in the fall of 1961, a few of them got to- 
gether and did something about it. Ruth T. Kartchner, Elayne Fisher, 
and Nan Stewart, got the ball rolling, by inviting all the Dixon Cousins 
to a luncheon at Ruth's home. It was such fun, and everyone enjoyed 
themselves so much, it was decided that very day to make it a semi- 
annual, or even three times a year affair. So it was begun. The news- 
paper clipping of the event went as follows: 

September 6, 1961: 

40 Cousins Enjoy Party at Provo Home 

" The birth of a unique group was initiated on Saturday at the home 
of Mrs. Fred (Ruth) Kartchner when 40 of her cousins gathered to be- 
gin an organization known as the Dixon Cousins. Kin gathered from 
Salt Lake City, Ogden, Wallsburg, Orem and Provo. 

Sparking the first meeting and instigating the idea were: Mrs. 
Kartchner, Mrs. Grant (Elaine) Fisher, and Mrs. Keith (Nan) Stewart. 

A buffet luncheon was served and each guest gave a short state- 
ment of her present status, her husband and children to bring every- 
one up to date. 

Assisting the committee were Mrs. Arthur D. ( Maurine) Taylor, 
Mrs. Elton ( Ethel) Taylor, Mrs. Kenneth ( Julia) Anderson and Mrs. 
Boyd ( Dixie) Frampton, Mrs. Mark ( Ruth) Cannon, Mrs. Lynn 
( Celestia) Taylor and Linda Kartchner. 

It was decided to hold meetings three times a year with a family 
reunion in the summer time. " 

The next meeting was held in Salt Lake at the Lion House, with 
the Salt Lake Cousins as hostesses. Mrs. El Roy Nelson ( Alice ) and 
Mrs. Clyde (Sarah) Summerhays, and Mrs. Paul ( Ora) Dixon, were 
chairmen of the affair. All cousins from the Salt Lake area helped 
with a luncheon, and entertainment. It was such fun! One of the act- 
ivities that was enjoyed so much, was a song sung by the group, to the 
tune of "Happy Talk" from South Pacific with original words by Sarah, 
just for us. We've enjoyed it so much, we sing it occasionally now and 
then. (See pages 259 and 260 for the complete verse. ) 



261 



262 



DIXON COUSINS 



As time went on we felt it would be easier to let each family or 
group of families take their turn at entertainment, so this plan has 
been followed since. Some families do not have as many members 
around, so quite often, two or even three families will combine their 
efforts for our entertainment. We also decided to meet twice a year, 
on Saturday, one week following October and April Conference respect- 
ively, with the hostess family contacting the cousins, and making all 
arrangements for the luncheons and entertainment. 

In October, 1964, the John DeGrey Dixon Family entertained. 
Maud Dixon Markham, in her inimitable fashion, related a story of her 
mother (Sarah Lewis) and the Dixons. It goes something like this (with 
apologies to Maud. ) 

The Lewis Family was like most of the early pioneer families, liv- 
ing under stringent circumstances, and Aunt Sarah often recalled how 
they had to make their underwear out of flour sacks with Turkey Red 
or XXX showing up on the seats of their pants. When the proverbial 
Monday Wash Day would arrive, the Lewis' would hang their flour- 
sack underwear out on the line, then look longingly across the fence to 
see, what to them was a most beautiful and envious sight- -red woolen 
underwear, flapping in the breeze! Grandfather Dixon worked at the 
Provo Woolen Mills, and was able to get end pieces of the red woolen 
material from the mill, and would bring it home for Grandmother 
Dixon to make underwear for the children. To Aunt Sarah, it was the 
acme of living. Then one day, she married into the Dixon Family and 
all of its wonderful red woolen underwear. 

In April, 1965, the A. N. Taylor Family entertained the cousins. 
Everyone had enjoyed Maud's story of the underwear so much, they 
decided to do something fun about it. Tony Taylor, son of Henry D. 
Taylor, was contacted, told the story, and asked to come up with some 
kind of a Dixon Shield, depicting the story, as well as portraying char- 
acteristics and events in the Dixon Family History. He came up with 
our "Dixon Cousins Shield". The red hair, and exaggerated Dixon 
build was incorporated with the red underwear. In each corner of the 
shield were other representative symbols ;the ship representing Grand- 
father Dixon coming to Utah from South Africa; the lion representing 
our English heritage; the covered wagon and oxen representing their 
trek across the plains; and the tree to stand for our family tree. Small 
minatures of this heraldic shield were made and presented to each 
member there. Thus the birth of the Dixon Cousin Shield. (See Page 
265 for a reproduction of this shield). 

In April, 1966, the Charles Dixon Family entertained. It was sug- 
gested by Mrs. Wesley (Stella) Lewis to change our name from the 
"Dixon Cousins" to the "Dixon Heritage" group. This suggestion was 
well taken as it would encompass a broader scope, and reach out to 



DIXON COUSINS 



263 



more than just cousins. So our new official name came about. I'm 
afraid, more often than not, we tend to slip back to our old ways, and 
the "cousins", we officially know better. 

In October, 1967, the Sarah Dixon McConachie, and Parley Dixon 
Families entertained, and had bulletin boards with pictures of many 
of the Dixon homes, which we were asked to identify. Mary (Shear- 
smith) Ensign's, and Doris (Shear smith) Thompson's grandchildren 
(Aunt Fanny's grandchildren), sang a clever song of "We're Lucky 
We're Cousins After All", as well as many others. 

In October, 1968, it was discussed about having our gathering only 
once a year, rather than twice, as we had our regular Dixon Reunion 
in November, and a summer party for the children. It was voted on, 
and passed to hold it just once a year, the Saturday following April 
Conference. The Arnold Dixon Family were hostesses at this meeting, 
held at the B. Y. U. Wilkinson Center. 

Our gatherings have each been different, according to the hostess 
group. Each time being something distinctive, we have had readings, 
dancing, games, singing, histories, both read and sung, stories, and 
honored two of our male cousins, Henry Aldous Dixon II, and Arthur 
Dixon Taylor. Meeting places have been varried, and many, such as 
the Sky Room at B. Y. U. , Rodeway Inn, Royal Inn, Ward Houses, 
Women's Club House of Provo,The Lion House, Hot Shoppes and Fort 
Douglas Country Club in Salt Lake, and at an Inn in Ogden. Our orig- 
inal group started out at forty; our last meeting had 104 cousins pre- 
sent. More and more cousins keep looking forward to our annual get- 
together, and we hope it will always be so. 




1. The Lion -"King of Beasts" of Africa - Grandfather, Henry Aldous 

Dixon's birthplace. 

2. The Sailing Ship "Unity" which Henry Aldous Dixon sailed on when he 

left Port Elizabeth, Cape Colony, South Africa in 1856. 

3. The covered Wagon and Ox Team, Henry Aldous Dixon drove across 

the "plains" to reach Utah in 1857 

4. The Elm Tree, Henry Aldous Dixon planted on his homesite in Provo 

in 1875 and which is still living (1970). 

5. The Red Hair - A Dixon "trade mark" inherited from Henry Aldous 

Dixon by many of his posterity. 

6. The Red Underwear - The course Woolen Mills Factory material worn 

by the Dixon children and in abundant display, on the Dixon drying line 
on washday 

MOTTO: Be pretty if you are. Be witty if you can. 

But be cheerful if it kills you! 

Created from descriptive story of Maud Dixon Markham. 
Illustration by Anthony H. Taylor 

265 



EXPLANATION OF FAMILY IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 



The family identification number is a simple way of being able to 
look at any of the names of Henry Aldous Dixon's posterity and by the 
identification number assigned to this individual , immediately de- 
termine which of the sixteen children they descend from. It will also 
show if they are of the first, second, third or so, generation and where 
they fit into each family according to date of birth. 

As an example: 

13. 112 is the I. D. No. of JAMES HAROLD MC EWAN. 

13 (I.D.No.). The 13th child of H. A. Dixon is Parley Smith. 

13.1 (I.D.No.) is Parley's oldest child Vernon. 

13.11 (I.D.No.) is Vernon's oldest child, Lois. 

13. 112 (I.D.No. ) is Lois' 2nd oldest child James Harold. 

Or: 

2142 (I.D.No. ) is assigned to KAY DIXON. 

2 (I.D.No. ) is John DeGrey Dixon, 2nd child of Henry A.Dixon. 
21 (I.D.No. ) is the oldest child of John DeGrey Dixon, who is 

Henry Aldous Dixon II. 
214 (I.D.No.) is John Aldous Dixon, 4th child of Henry Aldous 

Dixon II. 

2142 (I.D.No. ) is Kay Dixon, 2nd child of John Aldous Dixon. 

Or: 

16. 10. 2 is the I. D. No. of KYLE DEGREY CHRISTENSEN. 
16. (I.D.No.) is Arnold Dixon, the 16th child of Henry Aldous 
Dixon. 

16. 10 (I.D.No.) is the 10th child of Arnold Dixon, Doris Ann. 
16.10.2 (I.D.No.) is Kyle DeGrey Christensen, 2nd child of 
Doris Ann Dixon Christensen. 

The attached fold-out sheet, with the names of the sixteen children 
of Henry Aldous Dixon, provides visible access to these names while 
referring to any page in the Family Roster. The beginning page of each 
of the sixteen children's family in the Family Roster, is entered opposite 
their name. 



267 



CHILDREN OF HENRY ALDOUS 



DIXON 



I. D. NO. NAME PAGE NO. 

History Roster 

1 Henry Alfred Dixon - 269 

2 John DeGrey Dixon 145 269 

3 Arthur DeGrey Dixon 157 272 

4 Alice Smith Dixon Danger field 159 273 

5 Sarah Ann Dixon McConachie 163 273 

6 Maria Louise Dixon Taylor 172 274 

7 William Aldous Dixon 197 278 

8 Ernest DeGrey Dixon 201 280 

9 Robert Smith Dixon - 285 

10 Charles Owen Dixon 205 283 

11 Albert Frederick Dixon 211 285 

12 Walter DeGrey Dixon 215 286 

13 Parley Smith Dixon 233 288 

14 Le Roy Dixon 237 291 

15 Harriet Amelia Dixon West 245 293 

16 Arnold Dixon 247 293 



268 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31 


, 1969 










ID No. 




Birth 






Death 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


4 


May 


1884 


Sarah DeGrey 


27 Jan ] 


845 


17 


Apr 


1926 


1 


HENRY ALFRED DIXON 


14 Nov 1 


865 


1 


Jul 


1867 


2 


JOHN DE GREY DIXON 


16 Jul 1 


867 


4 


Oct 


1923 




Sarah Ann Lewis 


23 Apr 1 


868 


23 


Oct 


1951 


21 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


29 Jun 1 


890 


22 


Jan 


1967 




Lucile Knowlden 


9 Dec 1 


891 








21 1 


PHYLLIS DIXON 


21 Aug 1 


916 










John A. Shaw 


1 Feb 1 


915 








2111 


JOHN AUSTIN SHAW 


5 May 1 


942 










Mary Wilson 


14 Feb 1 


946 








21 11 1 


MARY ELIZABETH 


23 Jun ] 


969 


11 


Oct 


1969 


2112 


SANDRA SHAW 


16 Aug 1 


944 










John Alleman Davies 


24 Mar 1 


940 








21 121 


JON SHAW DAVIES 


18 Nov 1 


968 








2113 


KATHLEEN SHAW 


3 Jan ] 


947 








2114 


SYLVIA SHAW 


4 Dec 1 


949 








2115 


ERIN JEAN SHAW 


16 Mar 1 


954 








2116 


ANITA PHYLLIS SHAW 


13 Feb 1 


957 








2117 


ROBERT DIXON SHAW 


21 Dec 1 


958 


23 


Feb 


1959 


2118 


ROSE MARY SHAW 


13 Sep ] 


960 








212 


DOROTHY DIXON 


26 May 1 


918 










Virl L. Harrison 


30 Dec 1 


916 








2121 


LINDA LUCILLE HARRISON 


31 May 1 


944 










David Michael Welling 












2122 


PATRICIA HARRISON 


4 Feb ] 


947 








2123 


JUDITH HARRISON 


8 Aug ] 


950 








2124 


LISBETH HARRISON 


19 Jan ] 


95 2 








2125 


HEATHER HARRISON 


22 Dec ] 


956 








2126 


HOLLY HARRISON 


22 Dec 1 


956 








2127 


ANGELA HARRISON 


17 Mar ] 


.964 








213 


LOUISE DIXON 


18 Sep 1 


920 










E. Ferrin Larkin 


7 Jul ] 


-917 








2131 


DIXON FERRIN LARKIN 


3 Jul ] 


.947 








2132 


JULIA LARKIN 


13 Oct ] 


.948 








2133 


MARTHA ANN LARKIN 


19 Jan ] 


[951 








2134 


JAMES ROBERT LARKIN 


24 Jun ] 


L 952 








2135 


WILLIAM LYLE LARKIN 


21 Aug ] 


L 953 








2136 


JANE LARKIN 


13 Aug ] 


1957 









269 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1969 



ID No. 




Birth 




Death 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


1 A TV X 1 

14 Mar J 


835 


iviay 


1 Q OA 

x ort 


Sarah DeGrey 


Z / J an 1 


o45 


17 Anr 


1 Q7A 
x 7LU 


c 


TOHTST T>TT ("IP fTV nTYDW 
J UnlN UXLi ua£j I Ul-A. WIN 


1 A Tnl 1 
I D J Ul J 


ft A7 


A P) i-f 


X y CD 




vJcLJrd.Il jrl-XXXX JjCWIB 


6j Apr i 


ft Aft 
o DO 




1 QC 1 

X 7J X 


7 1 

L* X 


uitmry ATDOTTS DTXON 


7Q Tun 1 

c 7 j un J 


ft Qn 


?? Tan 


1 QA7 
x 70 1 




JLU1.11C XVI1U W1UC11 


7 ue c j 


ft Q 1 

VI 






71 A 


J VJrliN AljJJ VUu JJiAVJiN 


1 L T,,l 1 
ID J Ul J 


/ Cj 








I\d X Hid J C UpsUXl 










7141 
& X tX 


iJ X Hi V Hi IN J VJX11N JJXAV1N 


x o ivLay J 


QC n 
77 U 






7 1 47 
C X t c 


PTAV D TVOTvT 

XVfV I XJlAUiN 


1 "3. TVT^-r.- 1 

Xj 1NOV J 


77 1 






7 1 A% 


t tc a nTYHM 
JLilijA XJ 1-A. Win 


cd Apr J 


QA O 

70 A 






oi c 

Li J 


DTTTH A/TAP TOM HTYDM 
X\U 1x1 iVL/\.±\.lWlN JJiAUlN 


l 7 ivLay i 


QOH 
9 A 1 








i vj. axK vv . waiiiiori 


c'i Aug J 


7 AO 






71^1 


XjU L/IXjXj XJXA VJXN V^rlXNlNVJlN 


1 L Nov J 


95 1 






?1 Co 

LI J L 


\AATtK FITYHM <"* A T\.TT\JOT\.T 
lVX_r\.lA.LY JJ1AU1N ^jAININUIN 


15 Sep J 


959 






7 1 ^ 3 


KRISTEN DIXON CANNON 


az Dec J 


OA 
9fc> A 






LID 


DAVID ROBERT DIXON 


OA T — 1 

a 4 J an J 


93 1 






2? 


JOHN WILLIAM DIXON 


o oep J 


7 A 


n Tnn 


1 ft Q4 

± O 7" 


L* -J 


STANLEY LEWIS DLXON 


3 Mar 1 


ft QE 
£5 7D 


A A Y\f* 


1 Q47 
1 7^t { 




Luella Hannah Mad sen 


19 Jan 1 


AAA 
900 






7"\ 1 


JUNE DIXON 


11 May 1 


Q? 1 
7 Al 








George W. Robinson 


29 Mar 1 


QIC 

7 1 7 






7^11 


STANLEY WAYNE ROBINSON30 Aug 1 


QA A 
7^0 






7317 


JULIE ANN ROBINSON 


27 Jul ] 


AC! 
95 1 






731"} 


JOHN JAYROBINSON 


1 Apr 1 


95 9 






7^7 


JEAN DIXON 


11 May ] 


921 








Ralph Nye Smith 












ROBERT NYE SMITH 


9 Oct ] 










RODNEY SMITH 


25 Mar ] 


948 






7 1 ^ 

LJJ 


BARBARA DIXON 


16 Oct 1 


HOT 

922 








Jack Alvin Clegg 


23 Dec ] 


920 






7 ^ "3 1 


MICHAEL S. CLEGG 


7 Sep ] 


953 






7337 


BRENT D. CLEGG 


10 Jan 1 


956 






7% 


STANLEY LEWIS DIXON 


3 Mar ] 


895 


6 Apr 


1 7^ f 




Maurine Welker 


1 Feb ] 


o a n 

909 






236 


STANLEY LEWIS DLXON 


24 Sep 1 


Q"i ft 
7JO 








Judith Louise Russ 


8 Sep ] 


938 






73A1 


SHANNON DE GREY DLXON 


5 Apr ] 


O A C 
7DD 






2^A7 


MEGAN DIXON 


11 Jun ] 


966 






73A3 


RYAN PATRICK 


21 Aug ] 


968 






235 


DE GREY LE ROY DIXON 


4 Jun ] 


935 








Kay Darlene Dix 


5 Apr ] 


93o 






2351 


DALE LEE DLXON 


22 Apr 1 


A ZL A 

9d0 






2352 


BARBARA MAUREEN DIXON 14 Dec ] 


963 






2353 


MICHAEL KENT DLXON 


3 Jun ] 


968 






234 


DIXIE BETH DIXON 


4 Mar 1 


933 


13 Oct 


1937 


237 


LINDA DLXON 


4 Mar 


1940 







270 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31 , 1969 








ID No. 




Birth 




Death 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


4 May 


1884 


Sarah DeGrey 


27 Jan ] 


845 


17 Apr 


1926 


2 


JOHN DE GREY DIXON 


16 Jul 1 


867 


4 Oct 


1923 




Sarah Ann Lewis 


23 Apr ] 


868 


23 Oct 


1951 


24 


RULON STERLING DDCON 


9 Sep ] 


898 


27 Oct 


1965 




Erma Murdock 


5 Jul ] 


904 






241 


JAMES R. DDCON 


22 Jun ] 


929 








Suzanne Eyring 


20 Feb 1 


931 






2411 


MARK EYRING DIXON 


28 Mar ] 


954 






2412 


DIANE DIXON 


1 Aug 1 


957 






242 


JOSEPH M. DIXON 


12 Feb 1 


932 








Carleen May Dyer 


30 Sep 1 


939 






2421 


CHRISTOPHER DYER 


1 2 Aug 1 


967 






2422 


NICOLE NOELLE DIXON 


8 Aug 1 


969 






243 


G. MICHAEL DDCON 


2 Aug 1 


937 








Yvonne Romney 


16 Aug 1 


937 






2431 


CATHERINE BRADFORD 


28 Aug 1 


966 






2432 


MICHAEL ROMNEY DIXON 


11 Oct 1 


968 






244 


PETER M. DIXON 


21 Mar 1 


945 






25 


MAUD DIXON 


28 Feb 1 


901 








Fred L. Markham 


3 Jul 1 


902 






251 


JOHN FREDERICK MARKHAM 


5 Sep 1 


928 








Reeda Bjarnson 


18 Jan 1 


927 






2511 


STEVEN JOHN MARKHAM 


18 Oct 1 


951 






2512 


DAVID PAUL MARKHAM 


13 Dec 1 


952 






2513 


REED B. MARKHAM 


14 Feb 1 


957 






2514 


JAMES LEWIS MARKHAM 


28 Jul 1 


959 






2515 


ROBERT DIXON MARKHAM 


4 Oct 1 


961 






2516 


JAE MARKHAM 


11 May 1 


964 






2517 


KAY APRIL 


4 Apr 1 


966 






2518 


DOUGLAS MARKHAM 


31 May 1 


968 






25 2 


DDCON JOSEPH MARKHAM 


18 Sep 1 


931 








Junece Jex 


23 Jun ] 


935 






2521 


MICHAEL DIXON MARKHAM 10 May 1 


957 






2522 


KEVIN RICHARD MARKHAM 25 Jul 1 


958 






2523 


MARY ANN MARKHAM 


31 Jul 1 


961 






25 24 


KARL MARKHAM 


4 Mar 1 


967 







271 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31 


1 QAQ 
, i 70 7 








ID No. 




id it zn 




Death 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


1 iviar j 


ft "X c, 

.ODD 


*± iviay 


1 ft ft A 


Sarah DeGrey 


27 Jan 3 


845 


17 Apr 


1926 


C 


TOHM TUT frR ]?V FlTYDM 


J. D J Ul J 


00 ( 


t wet 


1 Q 9 1 




oaran Ann Lewis 


23 Apr 1 


868 


£9 WCC 


179 1 


9£ 

CD 


Fred L. Markham 


Co x e d J 

Tnl 1 


. 7vJ 1 

Qfi9 
. y\J C 






CD 9 


RARRARA AMM MARKHAM 

VvciQOn JJdlllc a 


c 7 iviay j 


. 7 jj 






9 c; i 
CD D 1 


DTruA X? "H "nATKTTTC: 
±\1 WrxxVrviJ ±JJ\±L\iLiO 


1 wet 


Q^ft 






CD j C 




25 May 


960 






2533 


RUSSELL DAINES 




. 709 






2534 


JOHN DAINES 


1 M.ay 


Q Aft 
. 7D0 






9 c; a 
CD*t 


Tl T A T\T TT T OTTTQTT \A A T? K"H A A/T 

uary otewart 


co j un j 








2541 


BETH ANN STEWART 


29 Aug 1 


963 






2542 


EMILY STEWART 


27 Feb ] 


967 






26 


LUCIAN DIXON 


1 7 Tun 1 

1 i j un j 


7U9 


22 Mar 


1904 


27 


GRANT DIXON 


ju iviar j 


y\JD 


18 Dec 


1 905 


3 


ARTHUR DE GREY DIXON 


5 Oct ] 


869 


5 Jun 


1911 




Catherine Kezia Morgan 


19 Mar ] 


.886 


3 Mar 


1966 


31 


RAYMOND LANE DLXON 
Eva Ruthe Mildenhall 


26 Nov 3 
20 May ] 


918 
918 






31! 

3111 
3112 


LESSJE DIXON 

Thomas Ray Hardin 
LESLIE LAYNE HARDIN 
VERNON SHAYNE HARDIN 


7 Apr ] 
4 Jul ] 
1 May ] 
17 Dec 1 


943 
942 
960 
961 






312. 
3121 


MICHAEL LAYNE DLXON 
Glenda Cleveland 
LE ANN LAYNE DIXON 


29 Jan 1 
2 Apr 1 
12 May 1 


947 
956 
978 


14 Oct 1 977 



272 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1969 
10 No - Birth 
HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 14 Mar 1835 

Mary Ann Smith 3 Oct 



41 



ALICE SMITH DIXON 29 Apr 

Jabez W. Dangerfield 17 Apr 

JABEZ ALDOUS DANGERFIELD 20 Nov 



1852 
1870 
1872 
1901 



A "> 

42 


ROYDEN J. DANGERFIELD 


31 


Dec 


1902 




Helen Morrison 








421 


KAY DANGERFIELD 








422 


KARREN DANGERFIELD 








A O 

43 


AFTON DANGERFIELD 


18 


May 


1904 


A A 

44 


HAROLD D. DANGERFIELD 


14 


May 


1906 




Florence John 


17 


Nov 


1904 


441 


DIANE DANGERFIELD 


30 


Jan 


1930 




James Bovingdon 


11 


Feb 




441 1 


JAMES BOVINGDON 


13 


Jul 


1954 


A A 1 '1 

441 2 


MICHAEL BOVINGDON 


12 


Aug 


1957 


A A 1 Q 

441 3 


LYNNE BOVINGDON 


16 


Feb 


1961 


442 


CAROLYN DANGERFIELD 


3 


Mar 


1933 




Edward Lanahan 


6 


Sep 


1931 


4421 


f"* T X/™< A TV T X A TV T A T T l x r 

SUSAN LANAHAN 


29 


Apr 


1 /-\ r- / 

1956 


A A O 

4422 


Tk r 7— ■> T T/^l fl A V A TV T A T T A TV T 

MELISSA LANAHAN 


18 


Dec 


1 958 


4423 


A "V ^ X T X A TV T" A T T A » T 

AMY LANAHAN 


21 


Jan 


1961 


4b 


CLIFFORD D. DANGERFIELD 


14 


May 


1906 


A r* t 

45 1 


J. WILLIAM DANGERFIELD 


7 


Apr 


1940 


46 


GRACE DANGERFIELD 


10 


Sep 


1910 




Curtis P. Harding 


1 


Jun 


1910 


461 


T» r X T*\ T A "K K T T A T"\ 1 "v xT\ T 

MIRIAM HARDING 


8 


Apr 


1939 




Glen Waterman 


18 


Apr 


1939 


461 1 


T"^ A T 7* T X~V x T~T TV T TIT A m T T T"Ti H JT A T\ T 

DAVID GLEN WATERMAN 


26 


Sep 


1 964 


4612 


MICHAEL CURTIS 


2 


Dec 


1 966 


462 


JUDY ANN HARDING 


3 


Dec 


1941 




Lorin K. Pugh 


24 


Jul 


1 941 


4621 


SCOTT CHRISTOPHER PUGH 


5 


Jan 


1967 


4622 


KEVIN JAMES PUGH 


23 


Oct 


1969 


47 


DONNA MAE DANGERFIELD 


15 


Mar 


1912 


5 


SARAH ANN DDCON 


7 


Dec 


1871 




Alexander Collie McConachie 


8 


Oct 


1863 


51 


DONALD MC CON AC HIE 


16 


Aug 


1898 


52 


NANCY SHEARSMITH MC CONACHIE 








7 


Oct 


1902 




Anthon G. Armstrong 


24 Jan 


1911 


521 


MARY DORIS ARMSTRONG 


2 Jan 


1945 



Death 

4 May 1884 

27 Jun 1907 

8 Dec 1948 

26 Sep 1949 

26 Mar 1902 

1 Nov 1969 



14 Feb 1905 



26 Dec 1950 
16 Jan 1938 
4 Mar 1902 



2 Jan 1945 



273 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31 


, 1969 








ID No. 




Birth 




Death 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


4 May 


1884 


Sarah DeGrey 


27 Jan ] 


845 


17 Apr 


1926 


6 


MARIA LOUISE DIXON 


5 Jan ] 


872 


17 Feb 


1947 




Arthur N. Taylor 


2 Nov 1 


870 


10 Sep 


1 935 


61 


ARTHUR DIXON TAYLOR 


4 Oct 1 


895 








Maurine Goodridge 


2 Nov 1 


899 






oil 


J1.LAYNE TAYLUR 


TOT 1 

1 2 Jun J 


922 








Grant A. Fisher 


8 Jun J 


919 






Dill 


rp t—» T"> T"> T T7* TO TJT 17* "D 

1ERRI r 1SHER 


27 May 1 


950 






6 1 1 Z 


JEFFREY TAYLOR FISHER 


24 May 1 


95 2 






6113 


KATHY FISHER 


12 Apr 1 


955 






61 Z 


KENT GOODRIDGE TAYLOR 


5 Dec 1 


925 






613 


NANCY TAYLUR 


15 Nov 1 


927 








G„ Keith Stewart 


12 Aug 1 


928 






6131 


BRENT TAYLOR STEWART 


/ -K AT 1 

6 Mar 1 


954 






/too 

6132 


KIM TAYLOR STEWART 


15 Apr 1 


95 6 






/TOO 

6133 


JAN STEWART 


9 Mar 1 


960 






6 1 34 


JON TAYLOR STEWART 


25 Dec 1 


965 






614 


DIXIE TAYLOR 


9 Mar 1 


932 








Boyd F. Frampton 


30 Apr 1 


932 






6141 


MARRIANNE FRAMPTON 


25 Nov 1 


956 






614Z 


DAVID TAYLOR FRAMPTON 


9 May 1 


958 






6143 


BRUCE TAYLOR FRAMPTON 22 Feb 1 


960 






6144 


SUSAN FRAMPTON 


30 Nov 1 


961 






6145 


PAUL TAYLOR FRAMPTON 


1 2 Sep ] 


964 






6146 


ALAN TAYLOR FRAMPTON 


22 Dec 1 


967 






6147 


KENT TAYLOR FRAMPTON 


25 Sep ] 


969 






62 


LYNN DIXON TAYLOR 


6 May 1 


898 


2 Jul 


1967 




Celestia M. Johnson 


8 Apr 1 


903 






621 


JOHN ARTHUR TAYLOR 


2 Oct 1 


928 








Catherine Pearson 


24 Dec 1 


931 






6211 


JOHN ARTHUR TAYLOR Jr. 


13 May 1 


958 






6212 


THOMAS TAYLOR 


14 Aug 1 


95 9 






622 


JANICE TAYLOR 


24 Feb 1 


931 








Monte DeGraw 


31 Mar 1 


929 






6221 


MICHELE DE GRAW 


9 Aug 1 


956 






6222 


DERK TAYLOR DE GRAW 


18 Aug 1 


958 






6223 


GREGORY TAYLOR DEGRAW 21 Jul ] 


962 






6224 


NICOLE DE GRAW 


25 Jul 1 


966 







274 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31 


, 1969 








ID No. 




Birth 




Death 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


4 May 


1884 


Sarah DeGrey 


27 Jan ] 


845 


17 Apr 


1926 


6 


MARIA LOUISE DIXON 


5 Jan ] 


872 


17 Feb 


1947 




Arthur N. Taylor 


2 Nov 1 


870 


10 Sep 


1935 


62 


LYNN DIXON TAYLOR 


6 May 3 


898 


2 Jul 


1967 




Celestia M. Johnson 


8 Apr 1 


903 






623 


LYNN ANNE TAYLOR 


17 May 1 


935 








H. Bryan Richards 


18 Mar 1 


934 






6231 


CAROL LYN RICHARDS 


29 Apr 1 


959 






6232 


SHARI RICHARDS 


28 Nov 1 


960 






6233 


BRYAN TAYLOR RICHARDS 


20 Sep 1 


962 






6234 


ROBYN RICHARDS 


28 Dec 1 


965 






6235 


HEIDI RICHARDS 


3 May 1 


967 






624 


KATHRYN DEE TAYLOR 


11 Sep 1 


941 








Brent Brockbank 


25 Apr 1 


937 






6241 


ALLEN BRENT BROCK- 












BANK, Jr. 


3 Sep ] 


964 






6242 


ANNE BROCKBANK 


4 Jan 1 


967 






6243 


LYNN BROCKBANK (F) 


29 Jul 1 


968 






625 


GEORGE TERRY TAYLOR 


13 Sep ] 


944 






63 


ELTON LEROY TAYLOR 


22 Jun ] 


900 








Ethel L. Scott 


13 Jul ] 


904 






631 


JULIA TAYLOR 


30 Aug 1 


927 








Kenneth R. Anderson 


2 Feb 1 


924 






6311 


KRIS TINE ANDERSON 


25 May ] 


952 






6312 


SCOTT TAYLOR ANDERSON 


30 Mar 1 


954 






6313 


KENNEN ANDERSON (F) 


11 Apr 1 


958 






6314 


JED TAYLOR ANDERSON 


1 May 1 


960 






632 


JAMES SCOTT TAYLOR 


10 Mar 1 


930 








Deanna Kay Hoen 


8 May 1 


940 






6321 


JAMES HOEN TAYLOR 


3 Dec 1 


960 






6322 


SCOTT HOEN TAYLOR 


15 Oct ] 


962 






6323 


TERI TAYLOR 


16 May 1 


964 






6324 


KATHY TAYLOR 


12 Nov 1 


965 






6325 


DAVID HOEN TAYLOR 


11 May 1 


967 


13 May 


1967 


6326 


JULIE TAYLOR 


26 May 1 


969 






633 


PAUL SCOTT TAYLOR 


7 Jul 1 


933 








Nancy Lee Tanner 


30 Aug ] 


937 






6331 


DIANE TAYLOR 


27 Jun 1 


95 9 






6332 


WAYNE TANNER TAYLOR 


27 May ] 


960 






6333 


JOHN TANNER TAYLOR 


18 Jul ] 


963 







275 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1969 

Birth 



ID No. 
HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 
Sarah DeGrey 
6 MARIA LOUISE DIXON 

Arthur N. Taylor 
63 ELTON LEROY TAYLOR 

Ethel L. Scott 
634 LOUISE TAYLOR 

Clifford A. Woodruff 

6341 SHELLY K. WOODRUFF 

6342 BECKY LYNN WOODRUFF 

6343 BARRY CLIFFORD WOOD- 



1 A Ti r 

14 Mar 


1 nor 
lOOD 


ciJ an 


1 Q A C 

1 o4j 


o j an 


liS ( Z 


C IN U V 


l R7n 


ZZ J un 


1 C\ f\ A 

1900 


13 Jul 


1904 


1 Aug 


1938 


11 Dec 


1937 


14 May 


1958 


11 Nov 


1959 





RUFF 


3 Mar 


i oA o 

1 7D C 


L 1 A A 


RUSSELL ELTON WOODRUFF 21 Nov 


1 OA 1 
1 7D J 


04 


IT TP T\T TD V T> TV (^iT\T T A V T (~\ TD 


OO T\T /-«•*■• 

LL 1NOV 


1 7U0 




Alt a Hansen 


i ( ue c 


1 7U0 


04 1 


HENRY D1XOJN 1 AY LOR, Jr. 


Z I r e D 


l V j 1 




Colette Green 


1 5 Apr 


17JJ 


04 1 1 


t_r tt> t\T T? V 'Pi TV OTVT TAVT OR TTT 
JTLJli IN X\ I UU\ wlN 1 AI LUa 111 


1 /I A *M« 

i ft Apr 


1 70 


AA1 9 
04 I C 


f TjriA /f AC T~> TP XT' T\T TAVT f^lTD 


i u oep 


1 7D I 


A41 ^ 


■o r> AnirnTj'n or tttttm tavt or 


o Apr 




A4 1 A 


A A/TV TAVT OP 


c c oep 


1 QA1 

I 70 1 




OTTOR!'"' XT PDF1TM TAVT O 15 


"X Tun 

j J un 


1 QAA 


6416 


NTTOOT IT TAVT OR 


U IN O V 




A41 7 


"RR Tr.U A \A ORTTTPTM TAVT OR 
JjlvlUrlAlVl vj±\.±LixijlN 1 Al LUa 


Q A v. f 

o Apr 


1 QA7 
1 70 f 


6418 


JYLtLv_iAlN IAi LUK 


5 Apr 


1707 


A4? 


ANTHONY HANSEN TAYLOR 


4 Apr 


1 7JJ 


Urr J 


STEPHEN KROGE TAYLOR 


6 Jan 


1 7*t£ 




Lorna Bird 


16 Feb 


1947 


644 


DAVID ARTHUR TAYLOR 


27 Mar 


1946 


65 


ALICE LOUISE TAYLOR 


18 Nov 


1906 




G. EIRoy Nelson 


20 Jun 


1905 


651 


ARTHUR TAYLOR NELSON 


22 May 


1937 




Bonnie McKay 


22 Feb 


1939 


6511 


MICHAEL MCKAY NELSON 


15 Dec 


1966 


652 


JOHN CHRISTIAN NELSON 


14 Jun 


1940 




Mary Lynne Sanders 


9 Feb 


1942 


6521 


CHRISTINE NELSON 


28 Aug 


1966 


6522 


DAVID CHRISTIAN 


23 Oct 


1968 


653 


CHRISTINA LOUISE NELSON 


18 May 


1943 




Ronald W. Preston 


4 Nov 


1942 


6531 


SUZANNA PRESTON 


1 5 May 


1969 


654 


HENRY ALDOUS NELSON 


28 Apr 


1946 


655 


JAMES NICHOLLS NELSON 


3 Mar 


1950 



Death 
4 May 1884 
17 Apr 1926 
17 Feb 1947 
10 Sep 1935 



6 Jul 1967 



276 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31 


, 1969 










ID No. 




Birth 






Death 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DDCON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


4 


May 


1884 


Sarah DeGrey 


27 Jan ] 


845 


17 


Apr 


1926 


6 


MARIA LOUISE DIXON 


5 Jan 1 


872 


17 


Feb 


1947 




Arthur N. Taylor 


2 Nov 1 


870 


1 


Sep 


1935 


66 


CLARENCE DIXON TAYLOR 


11 May 1 


909 








67 


ORSON KENNETH TAYLOR 


3 Nov 1 


913 


31 


Oct 


1940 




Ethelyn Peterson 


2 Dec 1 


914 








68 


RUTH ELAINE TAYLOR 


20 Mar 1 


917 










Fred Dixon Kartchner 


6 Dec 1 


914 








681 


LINDA KARTCHNER 


23 Apr 1 


943 










Steven L. Tyler 


17 Feb 1 


943 








6811 


MICHAEL TYLER 


8 Dec 1 


968 








682 


KENNETH TAYLOR KARTCHNER 11 Dec 


: 1944 










MariAnne Allene Davis 


1 2 Jun ] 


944 








683 


ELAINE KARTCHNER 


26 Jun ] 


947 


21 


Oct 


1947 


684 


ELLEN KARTCHNER 


13 Oct ] 


948 








685 


RICHARD TAYLOR KARTCHNER 7 Apr 1 


950 








686 


DAVID TAYLOR KARTCHNER 


3 Apr ] 


.951 








687 


ROSENA LOUISE KARTCHNER 14 Jul 1 


.95 2 








688 


MARY ANN KARTCHNER 


27 Nov 1 


958 









277 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 



As of December 

ID No. 

HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 

Mary Ann Smith 
7 WILLIAM ALDOUS DIXON 

Harriet Hands 

71 WILLIAM HANDS DIXON 

72 VESTA DDCON 
Albert Warren Booth 

721 GORDON DIXON BOOTH 
June Phoebe Erskine 

7211 GORDON DAVID BOOTH 

7212 CATHERINE BOOTH 

7213 STEPHEN M. BOOTH 

7214 CYNTHIA BOOTH 

722 GARY LYNN BOOTH 
Sherry Ann G audio 

7221 WARREN LYNN BOOTH 

7222 GREGORY BOOTH 

73 GLEN HANDS DDCON 
Elva Ellen Schemensky 

731 MAX GLEN DIXON 
Ina Mae Woolsey 

7311 TERRI MAE DIXON 

7312 CINDI MARLENE DDXON 

7313 LORI JEAN DDCON 

7314 BRET GLEN DDCON 

7315 STACY DIXON 

732 SHIRLEY MAE DDCON 
Harold Keith Davis 

7321 MICKI DAVIS 

7322 BECKI DAVIS 

73 23 GLEN HAROLD DAVIS 

7324 AMY ELLEN DAVIS 

733 ELVA JEAN DDCON 
Kenneth Lee Elliott 

7331 KELLE JEAN ELLIOTT 

7332 KERI LEE ELLIOTT 

7333 SHANE ELLIOTT 

734 WILLIAM FRANK DDCON 
Karen McClellan 

7341 TIMOTHY HUGH DDCON 

7342 TODD WILLIAM DDCON 

735 RICHARD S. DDCON 
Cherrie Pyper 



31 



, 1969 

Birth 

14 Mar 

3 Oct 

21 Apr 

25 May 

22 May 
10 Jun 

22 Jan 
16 Feb 

7 Jan 
1 Feb 

8 Aug 
24 Feb 

23 Sep 

4 Jun 
10 Dec 

15 Aug 

24 Nov 

5 Nov 
28 Dec 

7 Sep 
21 Jan 

16 Apr 

16 May 
7 Feb 

6 Sep 
10 Jun 

12 Sep 
23 Sep 

10 May 

11 Sep 

17 Jul 

18 Jul 
6 May 

3 Dec 
20 Sep 

13 Aug 

26 Dec 

4 Aug 
4 Oct 

13 Sep 
13 Sep 

9 Dec 

27 May 



1835 
1852 
1873 
1874 
1906 
1907 
1905 
1936 
1938 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1968 
1944 
1946 
1963 
1966 
1908 
1912 
1931 
1934 
1954 
1957 
1959 
I960 
1964 
1935 
1936 
I960 
1963 
1965 
1969 
1940 
1936 
I960 
1961 
1968 
1944 
1946 
1968 
1968 
1946 
1949 



Death 
4 May 1884 
27 Jun 1907 
22 Jun 1937 

22 May 1906 



20 Jan 1965 



278 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31 , 1969 
ID No. Birth 



HENRY ALDOUS DDCON 


14 Mar 


1835 


Mary Ann Smith 


3 Oct 


1852 


i 


T I T T T T TA "Ik IT A T "I— "V t T^*"l t™v ■*- ■« r~ v — v -» t- 

WILLIAM ALDOUS DIXON 


21 Apr 


1873 




XT * j_ TT T 

Harriet Hands 


25 May 


1874 


1 A 


MARY DIXON 


23 Jan 


1911 




Hyrum Aikele 


2 Jun 


1912 


-1 A 1 

/41 


T TT7 T\ TT> r T~X * TT -T" 1— \ T T— * 

HYRUM D. AIKELE 


21 Mar 


1938 


742 


WILLIAM EUGENE AIKELE 


28 Feb 


1941 




Irene Svenssen 


2 Jun 


1944 


*7 A 1 1 

7421 


7 \ T*V TT/ AT T 1 1 | TV T" A T T" 7" 1-1 T t— ■ 

ERIK ALLEN AIKELE 


2 Sep 


1965 


7422 


SHAUNTY MAJA AIKELE 


14 May 


1969 


743 


BONNIE ANN AIKELE 


30 Jan 


1944 




Clayton J. Cornish, Jr. 


19 Feb 


1943 


7431 


REBECCA LYNN CORNISH 


20 Mar 


1964 


7432 


ASH LIE MELISSA CORNISH 


28 Jun 


1967 


75 


HARRIETT FAYE DIXON 


1 Apr 


1913 




Erling T. Bjorklund 


12 Apr 


1914 


751 


ROBERT GARY BJORKLUND 


16 Apr 


1938 


752 


BARBARA GAIL BJORKLUND 


24 Feb 


1941 




Tom Meyers 


1 Sep 


1939 


7521 


KENNETH MEYERS 


9 Oct 


1962 


753 


GLORIA FAYE BJORKLUND 


30 Mar 


1943 




Clayton Nichols 


23 May 


1943 


7531 


JULIE NICHOLS 


8 Dec 


1961 


7532 


SHERRIE NICHOLS 


10 Jan 


1964 


7533 


TINA NICHOLS 


28 Feb 


1966 


754 


JANET MARIE BJORKLUND 


10 Dec 


1945 


755 


RICHARD ERLING BJORKLUND 1 Jul 


1947 


76 


GEORGE S. DIXON 


27 Sep 


1915 




Veon Collings 


30 Dec 


1914 


761 


CONSTANCE LEE DIXON 


22 Jul 


1 942 




Eddie Karawowski 






7611 


SCOTT EDWARD 


29 Mar 


1 967 


762 


ROBERT GEORGE DDCON 


27 Jul 


1 944 




Judy Gayle Wood 


19 Nov 


1 948 


763 


SHIREL FERRIS DIXON 


2 Mar 


1935 




Evelyn Rose 








Alberta Mae 


18 Mar 


1934 


7631 


LEE ANDREW DIXON 


10 Apr 


1962 


7632 


TIMOTHY PAUL DIXON 


11 May 


1964 


7633 


WAYNE DANIEL DDCON 


27 Nov 


1969 


9 


ROBERT SMITH DIXON 


10 Nov 


1874 



279 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1969 

Birth 



ID No. 

HENRY ALDOUS DDCON 14 Mar 

Sarah DeGrey 27 Jan 

8 ERNEST DE GREY DIXON 22 Dec. 

Mary Ann Painter 14 Sep 

81 ERMA MAE DIXON 10 Sep 
Arnold Boshard 22 May 

811 DEAN DDCON BOSHARD 5 Mar 
Norma Heatherly 28 Feb 

8111 NORMAN DEAN BOSHARD 23 Dec 

8112 BEVERLY ANN BOSHARD 23 Mar 

8113 ARNOLD VON HOLLEN 

BOSHARD 24 Aug 

812 ARNOLD BLISS BOSHARD 8 Jan 
Glenna Rae Edwards 29 Oct 

8121 C ARY BLISS BOSHARD 30 Sep 

8122 STEVEN ALLAN BOSHARD 6 Jul 

8123 GIN A BOSHARD 24 Nov 

82 LEAH LILLIAN DDCON 18 May 
Mayo Alton Ford 4 Mar 

821 MARILYN MAE FORD 29 Sep 
Edwin V. Simmons 6 Aug 

8211 WENDY LEE SIMMONS 6 May 

8212 LORI JEAN SIMMONS 30 Jun 

8213 DAVID EDWIN SIMMONS 17 Oct 

8214 TIMOTHY SIMMONS 24 Jul 

822 LOIS AMBER FORD 25 Nov 
Rex Bigelow 6 Aug 

8221 BRENT R. BIGELOW 15 Jul 

8222 ELAINE BIGELOW 21 Sep 
Steven Ted Nicol 6 Jul 

82221 STEPHANIE NICOL 22 Jul 

8223 GLEN M. BIGELOW 5 Dec 

8224 CINDY BIGELOW 4 Feb 

8225 AMBER BIGELOW 26 May 

823 DDCON ALTON FORD 30 Jul 
Anginita Maria Van Derbeck 26 Jan 

8231 KATHLEEN FORD 9 Feb 

8232 DALE FORD 13 Sep 

8233 CYNTHIA FORD 16 Dec 

8234 STEVEN MATHEW 4 Jun 



835 
845 
873 
875 
900 
898 
923 
923 
948 
952 

956 

929 
930 

952 
956 
961 
903 
906 
926 
923 
951 
953 
954 
95 9 
928 
931 
948 
95 2 
956 

969 
955 
958 
962 
932 
936 
958 
960 
961 
969 



Death 
4 May 1884 
17 Apr 1926 
15 Jun 1938 
23 Apr 1954 



280 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 



As of December 

ID No. 

HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 

Sarah DeGrey 
8 ERNEST DE GREY DIXON 

Mary Ann Painter 

82 LEAH LILLIAN DIXON 
Mayo Alton Ford 

824 JANICE ANN FORD 

John Theodore Neerings 

8241 JILL NEERINGS 

8242 TROY NEERINGS 

8243 SHE LI A NEERINGS 

8244 LISA NEERINGS 

83 ERNEST ARNOLD DIXON 

84 VERL GRANT DDCON 
Adryne Hodson 

841 LINDA DDCON 
Gary T. Rose 

8411 ROBERT DIXON ROSE 

8412 CHRISTINE ROSE 

8413 JAMES ROSE 
Virginia Poulson 

842 MARY ELLEN DIXON 

843 MERRILL VERL DIXON 

85 RALPH DIXON 
Eva Ruth Ward 

851 MARJORIE JEAN DIXON 
Robert Reed Boren 

8511 DAVID BOREN 

8512 MICHAEL BOREN 

8513 ELISABETH BOREN 

852 RALPH STANLEY DIXON 
Karen Lee Marrott 

85 21 ANDREE DIXON 

85 22 GINA DIXON 

853 GERALD ERNEST DIXON 
Donna Penrod 

8531 TERESA DIX ON 

854 RONALD WARD DDCON 

855 CHERI ANN DIXON 

856 SANDRA LEE DLXON 

86 RONALD DIXON 
Verneda Jackson 



31 



, 1969 

Birth 
14 Mar 
27 Jan 
22 Dec 
14 Sep 

18 May 
4 Mar 

26 Jul 

24 Apr 
9 July 

14 Feb 
17 Nov 
17 Nov 

25 Apr 

26 Nov 
11 Aug 
22 Jun 
14 Nov 
11 Apr 

4 Feb 
11 Aug 

7 Aug 
25 Jan 
31 Jan 
16 Sep 
30 Jun 
22 Jul 

8 Nov 
22 Dec 

9 Aug 
4 Mar 

21 Jan 

22 Mar 
3 Dec 

29 Jan 
21 Mar 
21 Nov 
9 Jul 

19 Dec 
19 Jan 

3 Mar 
16 Sep 
2 Sep 



1835 
1845 
1873 
1875 
1903 
1906 
1934 
1919 
1958 
I960 
1961 
1963 
1906 
1908 
1921 
1944 
1940 
1961 
1965 
1966 
1921 
I960 
1965 
1912 
1920 
1939 
1936 
1959 
1962 
1969 
1941 
1943 
1965 
1969 
1944 
1943 
1968 
1949 
1952 
1954 
1912 
1919 





Death 


4 


May 


1884 


17 


Apr 


1926 


15 


Jun 


1938 


23 


Apr 


1954 



26 Jan 1915 
28 Jun 1945 



281 



ID No. 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1969 

Birth 



HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 


1 O O C 

1835 


Sarah DeGrey 


2 t J an 


1 O A C 


Q 

o 


TT R KTTPQT Ft TT r.RFV nTYDN 
xLi X\IN JliO 1 Xv XLi \Jt XxxLi I i_/±.A. wlN 


Lc. JJec 


1 O 






14 bep 


1875 


« A 
o D 


RHNA T n nTYDN 

X\ IN L-iLJ LJ XV\ WIN 


1 o bep 


1912 




V OTTloH 1 T n /"» \f C flf* 

v crncua J aLR3 uii 


£ bep 


1919 


ft A 1 


XVrt. X rll\ X IN X^X-A. V— ' IN 


lb May 


in/in 

1 942 




X XlUAXlclS X_< LI Vv cL X Li V>X UWJ.C y 


16 Jul 


1939 


8611 


TRENT CROWLEY 

X X\ ' ' x N X V> I V \mJ V V XJi-J J. 


2 Dec 


1 9o2 


862 

\J \J Ld 


DEANNA DIXON 


o J an 


1 V44 




Steven B. Ivlar shall 


i d Apr 




8621 


ERIC STEVEN MARSHALL 


£o j an 


1 Q A Q 


863 


GARY RONALD DIXON 

N — •. J. XI V J- J. V W X N J. A. » |< XV J-*» 1 v i. x — ' X N 


?A Sen 


1 Q4-Q 


864 


DORSEY DIXON 


i IN o V 


1 7D D 


87 


EDITH ALICE DIXON 


£ ivia r 


1 Ql C 

J. 7 J. D 




Bernard Carl Fall entitle 

■1—* \— ' -i- X X CX. X > — l > — » ex. XX -A- CX X X >■» XX U XXX w 


1 7 A r> v 


X 7 I D 


871 

CIA 


JO ANN FALLENTINE 

<J v — y XX X 1 X N X XXXJXJXWl 1 X XllU 


1 Od u 


1 Q^7 




T ,vnn 1 dliiri ester 

1 1 y XXX X \J • v/ll X V_A *— ' 1* w X 


6 Aug 


1 Q^7 


8711 


SCOTT CHID ESTER 


7 Aug 


1 Q A ^ 


8712 


BROOK CHIDESTER IT) 

JJ1\ \/\/Xx iJllXxVXJU X 1 J X \ I X 1 


1 JJcC 


1 QAA 
1 7OO 


872 


CAROLYN FALLENTTNF 


1 O r cD 


1 7*±U 




R ol nln \A r*Til of ron 

XV CLX L/xl IVx. , v_J XX O II Ct LJ 


o vJct 


1 9-j 


R7 7 1 


CHRISTOPHER GILSTRAP 


24 Aug 


1 9ob 


8722 


MOLLLE GILSTRAP 


1 o JJec 


1 900 


873 


ROBERT BERNARD FALLEN- 








TINE 


23 Aug 


1942 




Kathleen Kastrinkas 


25 Apr 


1946 


874 


SUSAN FALLENTINE 


8 Dec 


1944 




David R. Flatberg 


1 Dec 


1946 


875 


MICHAEL DIXON FALLENTINE 3 Jul 


1961 



Death 
4 May 1884 
17 Apr 1926 
15 Jun 1938 
23 Apr 1954 



14 Dec 1962 



282 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31 


, 1969 








ID No. 




Birth 




Death 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


4 May 


1884 


Sarah DeGrey 


27 Jan ] 


845 


17 Apr 


1926 


1 0. 


CHARLES OWEN DIXON 


22 Nov 1 


875 


3 Mar 


1943 




Virginia Elizabeth Beckstead 


10 Dec 1 


886 


19 Aug 


1922 


10.1 


VA LERA DIXON 


21 Aug 1 


910 








Martin C. Ririe 


23 Oct 1 


910 






10.11 


DIXON FARRELL RIRIE 


2 Apr 1 


936 








Monta Mae Norris 


12 May 1 


937 






1 /-\ 111 

10. Ill 


STEPHEN DIXON RIRIE 


2 Aug 1 


957 






10. 112 


SUSAN RIRIE 


12 Apr 1 


960 






10.113 


SHARI RIRIE 


18 Jul 1 


965 






10. 1 14 


SHELLY RIRIE 


26 May ] 


968 






10. 12 


RICHARD OWEN RIRIE 


23 Nov 1 


939 








Larraine Humphries 


25 Feb 1 


948 






10. 121 


JANEAL RIRIE 


24 Mar 1 


969 






10. 13 


CRAIG MARTIN RIRIE 


17 Apr 1 


943 








Barbara Warrene Temple 


4 Aug ] 


943 






10. 131 


PAIGE DIANE RIRIE 


4 Apr ] 


967 






10. 14 


ANNETTE RIRIE 


17 Aug ] 


945 








Ronald Morris Turner 


27 Aug 1 


942 






10. 141 


ROBERT MORRIS TURNER 


23 Jun ] 


965 






10. 142 


REED MARTIN TURNER 


28 Jun ] 


967 






10. 143 


RYAN MICHAEL TURNER 


29 Apr ] 


969 






10. 15 


KENT HYRUM RIRIE 


24 Mar ] 


952 






10. 2 


RUBY DIXON 


26 Jul ] 


912 








Angus Wayne Cowley 


29 Jul ] 


910 


26 Sep 


I960 


10. 21 


WAYNE DIXON COWLEY 


14 Oct ] 


938 








Norma Jean Hadley 


30 Mar ] 


.946 






10. 211 


WENDY COWLEY 


15 Jan ] 


.969 






10. 22 


SHIRL CURTIS COWLEY 


18 Dec ] 


941 








Janeene Cheryl Tueller 


20 Oct ] 


.946 






10. 3 


STELLA DDCON 


26 Jun 


L 91 5 








Frederick Wesley Lewis 


6 Jul 3 


[915 






10. 31 


FREDERICK DIXON LEWIS 


1 Apr ] 


l947 








Patty Stott 


19 Nov ] 


[946 






10.32 


JOHN STEPHEN LEWIS 


11 Oct ] 


[949 






10.33 


LYNN ANN. LEWIS 


23 Mar 


[952 






10. 34 


SANDRA LEE LEWIS 


23 Jul 1 


[954 







283 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31 


1 9A9 
, lyoy 








ID No. 




. xjir tn 




Death 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


1 4 A A o ■»- 1 

i *± ivia r j 


8 "3 £ 

OJJ 


ivi ay 


1 P. R4 


Sarah DeGrey 


77 Ton 1 

ci j an j 


R4c; 


1 7 A nv 
x 1 Apr 


1 Q7A 

X 7 X.D 


i n 


V_> XXrt. X\. J_i JZiO w VV XlilN XJ 1AVJ1N 


7 7 "Mmr 1 
£ £ IN O V J 


o / D 


_> ivxax 


1 Q4^ 




\/ 4 -m «-»■ m w i m C 1 1 i r7 o r\£i 4" r~\ J— < <o /-» lj- c 4" & *a o 
V liglZllcl JLil/dUc III DcLKsLCdU 




OOD 


19 Ana 
X 7 AUg 


197 7 

X 7 X, X. 


i n 4 


AT TCE TjET ENNTA nTYON 


xo in o V J 


Ql 7 










X 7 J U.X J 


Q 1 7 








CHART EWE ANDRFW9 

jTL-TX XV -Li Xli 1 \ P. riiNXy AXj VV O 


1 D Ap x J 


Q4Q 
y'ty 






1 4? 


ROBERT DAT,F ANDREWS 


r\ T n T"l 

u j uxi j 


Q 1 ^ n 
7D U 






10 43 


DIXIE LEE ANDREWS 


O xxp x J 


pel 7 

7-5 x- 






1 44 


TOSEPH DTXON ANDREWS 


ij nuv j 








10.5 


OWEN GEORGE DIXON 


x. O xvxcL x J 


Q70 
y d\j 








Florence Janeczko 


l j xvxct y j 


Q74 
yet 






10.51 


LARRY OWEN DIXON 


1 ? Sen 1 


Q4A 






10.52 


KEVIN CHARLES DIXON 


^0 Ana 1 


Q48 






10.6 


VIRGINIA DIXON 


4- Tnn 

x U Lx-li J 


922 








Percy John Schugk 


1 9 Tan 1 

x 7 J all l 


/X. X 






10. 61 


DENNIS CHARLES SCHUGK 

-1 1 -J X 1 j. X X».»* V — XXX XX. v J jjj 1^ k> * — * V_-- X X <X X 


■pq Sen 1 


94^ 








Sharon Kilnatrick 


73 Ana 1 


94ft 

7tO 






10 A? 

J. \J • w Cd 


SIT7ETT SCHUGK 


31 Tan 1 


948 








Brent Bowles 


8 Oct 1 


944 

7~~ 






10. 621 


ROBERT JOHN BOWLES 


1 Tan 1 


700 






10. 63 


NANCY SCHUGK 


1 A Tnl 1 


7-> U 








Ronnie Lynn Mendenhall 


£t> JVLay J 








10. 631 


TROY LYNN MENDENHALL 


3 Jun ] 


968 






10.64 


JUDY SCHUGK 


27 Apr 1 


953 






10.65 


SONJIA SCHUGK 


19 Dec 1 


960 







284 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 







As of December 31 


, 1969 








ID 


No. 




Birth 


Death 


HENRY ALDOUS DLXON 


14 Mar 


1835 


4 May 


1884 


Mary 


Ann Smith 


3 Oct 


1852 


27 Jun 


1907 


9 


ROBERT SMITH DIXON 


10 Nov 


1874 


18 Dec 


1874 


1 1 . 


ALBERT FREDERICK DIXON 


31 Mar 


1876 


18 Aug 


1945 




Sena Rasmussen 


16 Oct 


1885 


16 Mar 


1944 


11 . 


1 


HARRY ALBERT DIXON 
Cecile Clark 


4 Oct 
1 Aug 


1910 
1913 






1 1 . 


1 1 


CECILE MARJORIE DIXON 


19 Feb 


1 95 1 






11. 


2 


MILDRED DIXON 
James Colin Tangren 


17 Jul 


1912 






11. 


21 


SHARON LYNN TANGREN 










11. 


22 


NANCY ANN TANGREN 










11. 


23 


JAMES DIXON TANGREN 










11. 


3 


CLIFTON R. DIXON 


11 Mar 


1914 


25 Mar 


1914 


11. 


4 


ELMO ARTHUR DIXON 


24 Feb 


1916 


14 Mar 


1917 


11. 


5 


NORMA DDK ON 
Richard G. Jess 


6 May 


1918 


20 Sep 


1956 


11. 


51 


RICHARD STEVEN JESS 










11. 


52 


BARBARA ANN JESS 










11. 


6 


VERA DIXON 
Dean A. Anderson 


22 Feb 


1920 


11 Apr 


1958 


11. 


61 


CAROL LESLIE ANDERSON 










11. 


62 


MICHAEL ALBERT ANDERSON 








11. 


7 


RUTH DIXON 


23 Jan 


1922 


21 Mar 


1923 


11. 


8 


BABY DIXON 


22 May 


1924 


22 May 


1924 


11. 


9 


MELVIN R. DIXON 
Carol Collard 


22 Oct 
21 Oct 


1925 
1926 






11. 


91 


LINDA KAY DIXON 


30 Jun 


1948 






11. 


92 


SUSAN DLXON 


19 Oct 


1949 






11. 


93 


DEBORAH DDCON 


8 Aug 


1952 






11. 


94 


DAVID HARRY DIXON 


10 Mar 


1959 






11. 


95 


AMY LYNNE DIXON 


2 Dec 


I960 






11. 


96 


EMILY ANN 


6 Oct 


1969 







285 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31 


1 969 

y X 7U 7 








ID No. 




XJ 1 x LI 1 




Death 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


1 4 Ma -r 1 

X XVXcL X J 


O D -J 


4 Ma v 

~ xvxcL. y 


1884 


Sarah DeGrey 


71 Tan 1 


R4R 


17 Anr 

x 1 il Ly x 


1 926 


l 9 

1 Cm 


WAT TTTR DTT f.R]?Y nTYON 

VV jt\±-i 1 J— i X\ J_> Xlj vJl\XL< 1 X-/ XW WIN 


1 ^ Nov 1 

1J 1NUV X 


ft 77 

Oil 


26 Nov 


1921 






"30 Tan 1 


878 


1 9 Anr 

x 7 x*-p X 


1 964 


1 7 1 

I C . X 


dufa T TTTT4FNTA DTYON 


9 1 Ana 1 

l_« X A LX Ll i 


902 








T^DTlf An AA7" R paxra 

T CIlLUXl VV . XXCCVC 


28 Ana 1 


8 99 
077 






19 11 


DTTTT-T T? TTTTV FT 
K U i Jtl x\ xIjXLi V xli 


97 Tun 1 


92 9 








T— T nTi/a rrl T~) T ,nwp 
liv w d x vx xy . w c: 


1 9 A n t* 1 


92 ^ 






19 Ill 
J. £ . ill 


XVxUi V 11N XT W VV £\±\LJ JjW VV XL 


2 "K M a v 1 
l. j xvx ar j 


9^ ^ 

73 J 






1 L, X J. £i 


T YNDA ANN T.OWF 

1 t X lllNlN X-iV-^ VV XL* 


% n A/To >• i 
j \j ivia r i 


7D D 






1 9 1 1 

1 L. 1 1 J 


F) A VTF) TOP DAN T DWF 
Uri v xiv j uajjain x_/ v./ vv XL 


^ u x 1 e d j 








19 114 
1 C . 1 1 rr 


KTTT\TT P)T\T AT ANT T DWF 

XVxLilN 1 WIN /\X_i-rt.lN X_/ w VV XL/ 


1 Ma v 1 

X VJ XVXCL y J 


9S 9 






12 11^ 


MARK DOTTr^T A9 T OWF 1 

X VX_rt. X\ I\ LJKJ KJKJ X-iT\.\D lju VV xLi 


22 Till 1 

^. C J 111 J 


9n ^ 
7O J 






19 9 


TTR FT) WA T TTTR DTYDN 

X? X\ X_/U VV /A.X_j X Hi x\ U1AVJ1N 


3 Till 1 

V W U LXX J 


904 
7 ut 








T — J q 1 o T** i n i n t~y~\ o ri 

ncicii wiiipixiciii 


21 Sep 1 


902 






12 ? ] 


MARY T OTT DIXON 


i u xviay j 


Q94 








X iu y u x\ . x a y iu i 


94. A r>T 1 
^ Apr x 


9 1 8 

710 






12 211 


COLLEFN TAYLOR 


12 A n-r 1 


9^ 

7-3 «j 








Stp ven Thorna s Dpnsl pv 


9 1 T?^V> 1 
c i £ t; u j 


947 






12. 212 


DOUGLAS DIXON TAYLOR 

XV v_/ *V W XJxlU x— / li\ W IN X XX X J 1 VV X \ 


A Anr 1 
U .rt.p x J 


9^ ^ 






12. 213 


RICHARD FLOYD TAYLOR 

X\X ' X iiiAL/ X XJ w X XV X XX X J J VV X \ 


23 Wnv 1 

C J J.N *J V J 


9^4 






12.214 


JULIE ANN TAYLOR 

U v — J 1 i -L 1— J a XI ill X X X X J — . X V 


24 Tan 1 


9Sn 






12.215 


LISA JEANNE TAYLOR 


1 1 Ana 1 

X X -TlLXg J 


9 C > 9 
73 7 






12. 22 


FRED CHIPMAN DIXON 

X. XVXJXy v_-XXXX IVlXXl 1 XVXil Vl<l 


1 8 Tun 1 


9^2 
7 J £ 








Pat vie ia Dona hup 

X CL C X X. X. Cv X/ V— ' X X CLX X v-X w 


91 c; pn 1 


70D 






12. 221 


MICHELLE TO DIXON 

1VXX ^ — J X X J — i J — j J — i X_j vJ W XV XXX W X N 


1 1 Anr 1 
1 X xx p x 1 


9"n8 
7 J 






1 2 222 


CYNTHIA SIIF DIXON 

\~y X IN X X liix IV V_J X_i XVXXXWXN 


1 3 Ma v 1 
x v xvxcL y j 


9n0 






12 223 


T^ISA KAY DTXON 


2 Tnl 1 


9A 1 

70 X 








TUT TfT ANNTT nTYnw 


-J JJC V_ J 


9r>7 
70 1 






12. 23 


RICHARD DDCON 


28 A n-r 1 
£.0 Apr j 


7J0 








Deanne Peterson 


1 J IN O V J 


Q^8 
700 






12. 231 


BRENDA DIXON 


9 Tim 1 


70 u 






12. 232 


MICHAEL DIXON 


id j an j 


Q A 
70 J 






12. 233 


DANIEL PETERSON DIXON 


5 Oct 1 


969 






12. 24 


DAVID CHIPMAN DIXON 


20 Oct ] 


944 








Patricia Stewart 


27 Nov ] 


943 







286 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31 


, 1969 








ID No. 




Birth 




Death 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


4 May 


1884 


Sarah DeGrey 


27 Jan ] 


845 


17 Apr 


1926 


12. 


WALTER DE GREY DDCON 


15 Nov 1 


877 


26 Nov 


1921 




Louie Maiben 


30 Jan 1 


878 


19 Apr 


1964 


12. 3 


DONALD MAIBEN DIXON 


12 Mar 1 


907 








Lettie Vilate Romney 


12 Jul 1 


909 






12. 31 


DIANE DDCON 


7 Mar 1 


932 








John Henry Tempest III 


26 July ] 


933 






12.311 


TERRI LYNN TEMPEST 


8 Sep 1 


955 






12. 312 


STEPHEN DIXON TEMPEST 


24 Dec 1 


957 






12. 313 


DANIEL DIXON TEMPEST 


18 Feb 1 


962 






12. 314 


WILLIAM HENRY TEMPEST 


1 July 1 


966 






12. 32 


DONALD ROMNEY DDCON 


18 Nov 1 


936 








Diane Scott 


4 Jun ] 


939 






12. 321 


DEBBIE DIXON 


6 Feb 1 


960 






12. 322 


SCOTT DDCON 


12 Jan ] 


962 






12. 323 


MICHELLE DDCON 


28 Oct ] 


966 






12. 33 


ALAN ROMNEY DDCON 


27 Jan ] 


945 






12.4 


EDNA DIXON 


25 Oct 1 


911 








Mark Squire Ballif 


7 Nov 1 


906 






12.41 


MARK DDCON BALLIF 


18 Jun ] 


932 








Kay Anderson 


23 Apr ] 


937 






12.411 


MICHAEL BALLIF 


5 May ] 


953 






12.412 


MARK BALLIF 


4 Jan ] 


955 






12.413 


JAN BALLIF 


22 Jan ] 


963 






12.42 


BARBARA BALLIF 


10 Nov 1 


933 








Kenneth Olson 


23 Mar ] 


930 






12.421 


DAVID KENNETH OLSON 


19 Oct ] 


961 






12.422 


PAMELA OLSON 


10 Apr ] 


964 








Blaine Wade 


4 Feb ] 


921 






12.43 


SCOTT BALLIF 


9 Dec ] 


935 








Sherma Craven 


30 May ] 


936 






12.431 


BECKY JEAN BALLIF 


29 Mar ] 


958 






12.432 


BRIAN SCOTT BALLIF 


26 Jan 


961 






12.433 


DEBRA ANN BALLIF 


7 Apr ] 


.963 






12.434 


BRYCE DIXON BALLIF 


23 Dec ] 


.965 






12.5 


AMY LAVERN DIXON 


2 Jul ] 


L915 








Doyle R. Larson 


9 May ) 


1913 






12. 51 


LARRY O NEAL LARSON 


5 Jan ] 


L949 






12. 52 


MICHAEL DIXON LARSON 


18 May 3 


L 954 







287 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 







As of December 31 


, 1 9o9 




ID 


No. 




Birth 




HENRY ALDOUS DLXON 


1 A ~K ~ 1 

14 Mar 1 


QIC 

83d 


Mary Ann Smith 


O A „4- 1 

3 wet J 




1 3. 




f AKIjxLiI oMIlri DiAvJiN 


9 Jun ] 


878 






Mary Etola Dangerfield 


1 O C ~ _ 1 

1 o bep J 


O *7 ^7 

877 


i i 
1 3 . 


1 


T r IT' "PI TV T OAT T TP IT* T"\T"V/^ > \'NT 

VERNOJN LEE DIXON 


ZZ May 1 


A A /I 

yu4 






Loleta Wiscombe 


u J un J 


yo5 


1 3 . 


1 1 


T ATP t-\tv AAT 

LOIS DIXON 


Z5 Aug 1 


924 






Junius Harold McEwan 


1/1 A 1 

14 Aug J 


924 


i 1 
13. 


111 


LYNDA MC EWAN 


1 >f a 1 

14 Aug 1 


945 


1 3 . 


1 1 o 

1 1 Z 


X A TV <f 1 — * (T* T T A T~i T T~\ "K K T"~* TIT A TV T 

JAMES HAROLD MC EWAN 


OA 1 

8 Apr 1 


948 


13. 


i l o 

113 


ATT A 7\ T T~\ T"V /~\T\T "K X T — » TIT A TVT 

ALLAN DIXON MC EWAN 


16 Oct 1 


95 1 


1 3 . 


ii/i 
114 


DAVID VERNON MC EWAN 


1 V Dec J 


V54 


I -> . 


lie 

lib 


A T TPM TD T A T_T A ID T^i TV A A TP TAT A T\T 

O l-i EN KICriAKD MC XL.WA1N 


"I A A 1 

10 Apr J 


A. / A 

960 


1 "J 
1 3 . 


1 9 


T T TP "D TXT T TP TP T~\ TVTMVT 

V EKIN l_i.Li.hj JJJLAC/JN 


OA 1 

8 Apr 1 


A O A 

929 






Margaret Anne Simpson 


Zb May J 


924 


1 3 . 


1 O 1 

1 £l 


T TP TP A MM T» TV AM 


24 Aug 1 


952 


1 3 . 


1 C.C 


TD A TTT TM TP T\TVAM 


b J an 1 


954 


1 7 
1 j . 




CTTV A M TP T\ TV AM 

oUZ-AlNJii D1A(J1\ 


<d4 Aug 1 


V->5 


1 ^ 


1 94. 


CUT TP TD T TM TP T\ TV" AM 


3 Mar 1 


a. [- "7 

957 


■l j . 


J. s> 


C A T? T AATTT T T A \fi HTYAM 
V_> A±\ !_/ W 1J_/J_i1A1V1 U1AU1N 


21 May 1 


a o r 

935 






Gloria Ann Evans 


14 May J 


937 


i -> . 


1 J 1 


TTTATVTA T VMM nTYHM 
UiAlNA J_/I1NIn JJ La. \Jl\ 


31 Oct J 


a r a 

959 


1 "3 


1^9 


T rp "D 1TCC CP V A V TlTYr>M 


13 Jun 1 


96 1 


1 

I j . 


1 J J 


A A D T AT" CP T? M TT TV AM 
tAl\L V Hj ±\1n JJ LA. WIN 


30 Aug ] 


Ck L O 

962 


i J! 




A TP TOM T> TYAM 
Ar 1 U1N U1AU1N 


*") A TV T ^ 1 

Z0 Nov J 


906 






uermont w. wagstaii 


TOT 1 

1 9 J an 1 


a a r- 

905 


J J. 


9 1 


TP) AMTYT A ~KA A TP TAT A A C T A TP TP 


28 Sep 1 


A *") A 

928 






Jerald Russell Olson 


/ C 1 

6 Sep 1 


A A) A 

928 


J. J . 


9 1 1 


TlA VTTl T3TTQQTTT T A T QOTVT 
UA V1D ±\ UOOHj J_i JLi VJJ_iOVJlN 


dl Nov 1 


949 




9 1 9 
£ 1 £ 


QTJT TP T T V AT CAM 


19 Nov 1 


a» r t 

95 1 


■I J . 


6i J 


CT CP "\rTPT\T A D ATA AT C AM 


O A T^v I 

20 Dec 1 


95 3 






AAT5V 1/fAMT AT CAM 


O A Tv T 1 

30 Nov 1 


957 






T< r TTTD r T TMVAM AT CAM 

rvUKl JJ1AUJN vJl_/bvJJN 


on a i 

3 Aug 1 


A/ A 

960 


I 3 . 


9 1 A 


T^TPTvTTC TP /^\T CAM 

DEJNlbE OLoON 


26 Sep 1 


A / O 

963 


13. 


22 


NORMA JEAN WAGSTAFF 


1 O A 1 

18 Aug 1 


AAA) 

932 






Jay Lorus Johnson 


l A A 1 

14 Aug 1 


AAA 

933 


13. 


221 


LORI JOHNSON 


O 1 TV T 1 

21 Nov 1 


954 


13. 


222 


JAY LADD JOHNSON 


25 Dec 1 


955 


13. 


223 


JERRY DIXON JOHNSON 


2 Feb 1 


957 


13. 


224 


LISA JOHNSON 


28 Jul 1 


963 


13. 


225 


JEFFRY WARREN 


24 Feb 1 


965 



Death 
4 May 1884 
27 Jun 1907 
30 Jan 1947 
27 May 1952 



288 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 


31, 1969 




ID No. 




Birth 




HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar ] 


835 


Mary Ann Smith 


3 Oct ] 


852 


13» 


PARLEY SMITH DIXON 


9 Jun ] 


878 




Mary Etola Dangerfield 


18 Sep 1 


877 


13.2 


AFTON DIXON 


20 Nov 1 


906 




Dermont W. Wagstaff 


19 Jan 1 


905 


13.23 


GARY MONT WAGSTAFF 


5 Dec 3 


940 




Jolene Robb 


22 Mar 1 


941 


13. 231 


CINDY BAE 


10 Aug 1 


964 


13. 24 


KATHLEEN WAGSTAFF 


16 Jan ] 


945 




Blaine M. Yorgason 


6 Dec 1 


942 


13. 241 


TAMARA LYNN Y ORGANS ON 2 Jan 1 


966 


13. 242 


NATHAN YORGASON 


26 Apr 1 


967 


13. 243 


STEVEN YORGASON 


6 Apr 1 


968 


13. 3 


EUGENE PARL DIXON 


17 Feb 1 


909 




Martha Bernard 


27 Jan ] 


919 


13.31 


JAMES EUGENE DIXON 


Dec 1 


945 


13.4 


REED D. DIXON 


1 9 Aug 1 


911 




Mary Matilda Hills 


13 July 1 


910 


13.41 


REED GARTH DIXON 


7 Apr 1 


933 




Mary Jane Chattin 


9 Aug 1 


931 


13.42 


MARY ANN DIXON 


14 Nov 1 


935 




Darrel W. Olson 


23 Apr 1 


931 


13.421 


CHRISTINE OLSON 


1 Dec 1 


960 


13.422 


ROBERT REED OLSON 


19 Nov 1 


962 


13.423 


DENISE LEONA 


8 Nov 1 


966 


13. 424 


STEPHEN JEFFERY 


21 Dec 1 


967 


13.43 


SHERRIE LILLIE DIXON 


3 Dec 1 


941 




Richard M. Austin 


21 Jul 1 


934 


13. 431 


SHAUNA BEE AUSTIN 


13 Jul 1 


961 


13. 432 


SANDRA KAY AUSTIN 


15 Feb 1 


963 


13. 433 


MICHAEL REED AUSTIN 


9 Jan ] 


966 


13. 434 


RICHARD SCOTT AUSTIN 


1 Jan ] 


967 


13.5 


INEZ DIXON 


20 Feb 1 


914 




Byron Leslie Denison 


4 Apr 1 


914 


13.51 


INEZ BERNIECE DENISON 


19 Nov 1 


933 


13.52 


ELAINE JOYCE DENISON 


12 Jan 1 


936 




La Mar R. Laws 


19 Nov 




13.521 


CINDY LAWS 


9 Oct 1 


953 


13. 522 


MARVIN LAWS 


19 Jan 1 


955 


13. 523 


TERRY LAWS 


13 May 1 


956 


1 3 . 5 24 


BECKY LAWS 


22 May 1 


957 


13. 5 25 


LAMAR LAWS 


9 Dec 1 


95 9 


13.526 


LINDA LAWS 


27 Nov 1 


961 



Death 
4 May 1884 
27 Jun 1907 
30 Jan 1947 
27 May 195 2 



27 Dec 1969 
21 Sep 1937 
20 Sep 1937 



289 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1969 

ID No. Birth Death 

HENRY ALDOUS DDI ON 14 Mar 1835 4 May 1884 

Mary Ann Smith 3 Oct 1852 27 Jun 1907 

13. PARLEY SMITH DIXON 9 Jun 1878 30 Jan 1947 

Mary Etola Dangerfield 18 Sep 1877 27 May 1952 

13.6 ANNA D DC ON 13 Apr 1916 
John Byron Barrett 23 May 1919 

13.61 SHIRL JACK BARRETT 13 Dec 1937 
Carol Roundy 

13.611 JACKIE KIM BARRETT 16 Dec 1957 

13.612 LEWIS KEVIN BARRETT 27 Dec 1958 

13.613 KRISTINE BARRETT 7 Aug 1961 

13.614 VERDA KAY LYNN BARRETT 17 Jul 1963 

13.615 KAND IE LEE BARRETT 24 Oct 1964 

13.62 MICHAEL WAYNE BARRETT 11 Dec 1946 
Linda Dee Urvina 

13.7 BERT LESTER DIXON 17 Sep 1918 
Virginia Oswald 

13.71 PATRICIA DIXON 

Helen Andelino 10 May 1915 

13.72 THOMAS ANTHONY DDCON 31 Jan 1947 

13.73 ROBERT TIMOTHY DIXON 3 Mar 1950 

13.74 JUDY DDCON May 1954 



290 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31 


, 1969 










ID No. 




Birth 






Death 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


4 May 1884 


Sarah DeGrey 


27 Jan ] 


845 


17 Apr 


1926 


14. 


LE ROY DDCON 


16 Oct ] 


881 


28 


Dec 


1926 




Electa LaPrele Smoot 


25 Sep ] 


883 


25 


Dec 


1940 


14. 1 


LE ROY SMOOT DIXON 


19 Nov 1 


904 


6 Jan 


1905 


14. 2 


PAUL SMOOT DIXON 


17 Apr 1 


906 


4 


Dec 


1955 






5 Jul 1 


906 








14. 21 


PAUL SMOOT DDCON, Jr. 


25 Feb 1 


932 










Mary Jane South 












14. 22 


VIVIAN DIXON 


13 Jun ] 


936 










Richard Llewelyn McKay 


-) L TP „ K 1 

co r e D i 


9^9 








14. 221 


REBECCA DIXON MC KAY 


14 Aug 1 


958 








14. 222 


CATHERINE DDCON MC KAY 


6 Sep ] 


960 








14. 223 


CHRISTINE DIXON MC KAY 


9 Oct 1 


962 








14. 23 


MARGARET ELECTA DIXON 


19 Jul 1 


945 








14. 3 


ALLIE DDCON 


15 Apr ] 


909 










Reed Snow Gardner 


5 Sep ] 


900 








14. 3} 


JAMES DIXON GARDNER 


26 May 3 


943 








14.4 


SARAH VERA DIXON 


23 Mar ] 


911 










Clyde J. Summerhays 


28 Apr 1 


905 








14.41 


SARAH SUMMERHAYS 


16 Jul 1 


932 










Raymond G. Anderson 


9 Feb 1 


926 








14.411 


LYNETTE ANDERSON 


20 Jul ] 


952 








14.412 


CRAIG S. ANDERSON 


19 Oct ] 


954 








14.413 


CLAIR S. ANDERSON 


2 May ] 


956 








14.414 


BRIAN S. ANDERSON 


26 Sep ] 


957 








14.415 


COLLEEN ANDERSON 


2 Apr ] 


959 








14.416 


CLYDE S. ANDERSON 


28 Apr ] 


961 








14.417 


JANAE ANDERSON 


26 Jul ] 


962 








14.418 


CATHERINE ANDERSON 


2 Aug 1 


966 








14.419 


CAROLINE ANDERSON 


28 Mar ] 


969 








14.42 


CLYDE DIXON SUMMERHAYS 20 Jun 3 


936 








14.43 


DIANA SUMMERHAYS 


13 Sep ] 


.943 








14.44 


MICHAEL DDCON SUMMERHAYS 15 Aug] 


.948 








14.45 


SANDRA SUMMERHAYS 


28 May 1 


951 









291 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1969 



ID No. 




Birth 




Death 


HENRY ALDOUS DDCON 


14 Mar 1 


835 


4 May 


n o o a 

loo4 


Sarah DeGrey 


27 Jan ] 


845 


17 A y^-~ 

l / Apr 


1 O O U 


1 A 

14. 


T IT" ID (~W7 T~\ TV P\M 


16 Oct 1 


881 


60 -L/C C 


1 7LU 




Electa LaPrele Smoot 


Lo bep i 


OO b 


uec 


1 74U 


1 A £ 
14, j 


\A A TTT? TMTP TlT"VOXT 


i p* — j i 
7 Oct J 


913 








ft A •* T "W PV W Tl Pi \ / P\ -y* p\ f t-\ 1 1 *-J P> 

iviyron uevere ^niius 


20 Aug J 


HAT 

907 


?A Tim 

j un 


1 7D ' 


1 A C 1 
14.5 1 


A1N1N L/rllJ_(UD 


in T 1 

29 Jan 1 


945 








Grant Lanny Daybell 


1 9 J an 1 


944 






~\ A CI 1 
14. Oil 


VEPTTT-J P 1 D A MT 1 Pi A VR ITT T 


20 Dec 1 


964 






i a ;n 
14. b 1 c 


TTTCCTT P T TTM r> A VRITT T 


4 May J 


967 






1 A C 7 
1 4 . D <S 


T T TT\ T TT-J X A A TT'DTMTT P I-TT T "P\C 

JUDlIri MA UKIInUi UrilJ_iUC5 


7 Nov J 


C\ A L 

946 








Thomas Allen Lucia 


9 Apr 1 


947 






14, D j 


J wrilN 1VL i ±\ wiN L/ rlll_iUo 


13 Apr J 


949 








busan rarker 


1 Dec ] 


p. r- p. 

950 






1 A C ^ 1 
14. D 51 


T AC PiM A/VBOM PUT T T»C: 


23 Oct ] 


969 






1/1 C A 

14. b4 


T> TPT_T A D T~\ TWVPiM PUTT T\C 

RICHARD UIaUJN CnlLDb 


4 Dec 1 


95 1 






14. bb 


IT TD TC T 1 TM TT" PUTT r»C 

i\.Rlb 1 1JN It. UrilLDb 


13 Apr 1 


955 






1/1 C £ 

14 . b o 


oTEVEN LE ROY LHlLDb 


22 Jul J 


p» r* ^7 

957 






1 A L 

14. o 


HELEN DDCON 


22 Jul ] 


pv T r- 

915 








E. Junius Payne 


30 Oct ] 


pv T O 

912 






1/1 £.1 

14.51 


T~> A T> "D ADA TTTTVTTT 1 Tl A "\7 1\T T7* 

BARBARA JUNE PAYNE 


31 Dec ] 


937 








Robert Lee Ipsen 


11 Aug ] 


936 






i/i £ i i 
14. oil 


ROBIN LEE IPSEN 


5 Sep ■] 


957 






i/i / *i o 
14. 612 


JANALYN IPSEN 


15 Dec ] 


95 9 






1 A L 1 1 

14. 613 


BRADLEY PAYNE IPSEN 


28 Jan 1 


961 






14. 614 


T— \ a T\ T A TV A \7P TTiCr , \T 

DANA KAYE IPSEN 


18 Dec 1 


964 






1/1 Z. O 

14.62 


BETTE LYN PAYNE 


8 Jul ] 


939 








Robert Warren Peterson 


27 May ] 


933 






1/1 iTI 

14 . £ 1 


l/DTCTT T T7T\T T~> TT* T 1 T7» T> C 1 P. "NT 

KRlbll LYN PE1ERSON 


21 Feb ] 


961 






14. 0<££ 


T TC A A MT\T TZ> C T 1 XT' ~D C Pi M 

.Lib A AN IN Jrii, 1 Ji,RbUJN 


21 May ] 


963 






1/1 A "5 "5 
14. O £b 


TJ D T A TvT T~> PiTD TP T) T~> TT* T TP T~> C^M 

BR1AJN ROBER1 PEIERbON 


11 Jun ] 


.965 






1 A 7 
14. f 


A O T T-J TTT3 CXiTr^nT T^TVOM 
Al\ InUK olVLLJLJ 1 ULA.VJ1N 


5 Nov ] 


918 


1/1 T 

14 J an 


1 O ~> "> 


1/1 c 

14. o 


ULAL) Yb DDCvJJN 


18 Jul 1 


921 








Ivan William Nelson 


3 Apr J 


p. *-> i 

921 






14.81 


IVAN WILLIAM NELSON II 


«"7 T 1 1 

7 Jul J 


943 






14. 82 


DAVID LE ROY NELSON 


7 Oct ] 


946 






14.83 


DIANE NELSON 


17 Oct 3 


951 






14.84 


KENT DDCON NELSON 


18 Oct ] 


954 






14.85 


CAROLYN NELSON 


14 Aug ] 


.956 






14.86 


JULIE ANNE NELSON 


18 Dec ] 


.960 







292 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31 


, 1969 










ID No. 




Birth 




Death 


HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 


1835 


4 


May 


1884 


Mary 


Ann Smith 


3 Oct 


1852 


27 


Jun 


1907 


15. 


HARRIETT AMELIA DIXON 


24 May 


1882 


23 


Apr 


1931 




George Washington West 


24 Feb 


1866 


26 


Feb 


1932 


15. 1 


LYNN DIXON WEST 


18 Aug 


1908 


12 


Jun 


1940 




Mabel May Hansen 












15. 11 


AUDREY LORRAINE WEST 


5 Dec 


1928 








15. 12 


DONALD LYNN WEST 


9 Jul 


1930 










Jackie Jean Ricks 














Winifred Marie Marker 


17 Dec 


1932 








15. 121 


DENISE IRENE WEST 


12 Nov 


1952 








15. 122 


DONALD LYNN WEST, Jr. 


22 Apr 


1955 









HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 


1835 


4 


May 


1884 


Sarah DeGrey 


27 Jan 


1845 


17 


Apr 


1926 


16. 


ARNOLD DIXON 


30 May 


1884 


1 


Sep 


I960 




Letitia May Banks 


15 May 


1891 


3 


May 


1955 


16. 1 


HOWARD BANKS DIXON 


11 Dec 


1912 










Fulvia Call 


11 Nov 


1916 








16. 11 


JERALD LAMAR DIXON 


26 May 


1939 










Karen Haymond 


11 Feb 


1942 








16. Ill 


CAMILLE DIXON 


23 May 


1966 








16. 12 


HOWARD ALLEN DIXON 


31 Oct 


1942 










Linda Jean Mangum 


28 May 


1946 








16. 121 


KRIS TINA DIXON 


20 Nov 


1969 








16. 13 


JANET DIXON 


2 Sep 


1946 










David Michael Rees 


21 Oct 


1943 








16. 131 


STEVEN MICHAEL REES 


22 Jul 


1969 








16. 14 


KENNETH CALL DIXON 


9 Nov 


1951 








16. 2 


EVELYN DIXON 


30 May 


1917 










Donald H. Smith 


15 Feb 


1918 








16. 21 


KAREN ANN SMITH 


4 Feb 


1945 










Wilford Charles Griggs 












16. 211 


BRIAN WILFRED GRIGGS 


23 Dec 


1967 








16. 22 


SUSAN LOUISE SMITH 


30 Jul 


1948 










Robert Byron Purves 


11 Feb 


1945 








16. 3 


GRANT DE GREY DIXON 


11 Apr 


1919 










Florence Rosella Marks 


14 May 


1945 








16. 31 


GREGORY MARKS DIXON 


26 Jun 


195 2 








16.32 


MICHAEL DE GREY DIXON 


4 Feb 


1954 








16. 33 


BRENT DIXON 


31 Jan 


1958 









293 



ID No. 
HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 
Sarah DeGrey 



HENRY A. DDCON FAMILY - ROSTER 
As of December 31, 1969 

Birth 



16. 

16.4 

16.41 
16.42 
16.43 
16.44 
16.45 
16. 5 

16. 51 
16. 52 
16.53 
16. 54 
16.6 

16. 61 
16. 62 
16.63 
16.7 

16.71 

16.72 

16. 73 

16. 74 

16. 75 

16.76 

16.77 

16. 78 

16.79 

16.7.10 

16.8 

16.81 
16.82 
16.83 



ARNOLD DIXON 
Letitia May Banks 
ELDON ARNOLD DIXON 
Sarah Jean Dastrup 

ELDON REED DDCON 

LARRY DEAN DDCON 

DENNIS DASTRUP DDCON 

ROGER DUANE DDCON 

JEANNINE DIXON 
BRUCE ROYDEN DDCON 
Colleen Callister 

LYNN ANN DDCON 

JOAN DIXON 

DAVID CALLISTER DDCON 
KRISTIN DDCON 

FLOYD PRESTON DDCON 

Lois Mai Dickenson 
DANA JOHN DDCON 
PAUL RAYMOND DDCON 
STEPHANIE GWYN DDCON 

GLORIA MAY DIXON 

Thomas Weslie Richardson 
CYNTHIA RICHARDSON 
DOUGLAS WESLIE RICHARDSON 2 Mar 
MARILYN RICHARDSON 17 Sep 

DAVID THOMAS RICHARDSON 18 Apr 
DON DIXON RICHARDSON 17 Nov 
GLEN ALAN RICHARDSON 3 Feb 

SANDRA RICHARDSON 24 May 

PATRICK ARNOLD RICHARDSON 12 Jun 



1 A A X 

1 4 Mar 


1o3d 


l { J an 


1 Q AC 

1 o4o 


j u jviay 


1 ft ftA 


I d iviay 


1 ft Q 1 


j i jviar 


1 Q? 1 
lycl 


1 Tin 

i J an 


1 7 CO 


1 1 Till 


1 QA L 
1 7^0 


j j an 


1 QAQ 

1 74 V 


c Uct 


1 7-5 U 


4 Jun 




21 J un 


TOCO 

1 95 9 


1 3 r e D 


1 QT1 


co J an 


1 QTi 

1 ycv 


C\J IN o V 


1 7_) C 


1 % Tun 


1 7D4 


13 Dec 


1957 


28 Jan 


1961 


D iNOV 


1 7^4 


21 Apr 


19-30 


o May 


l 958 


23 Aug 


1959 


1 Dec 


1926 


6 Jul 


1925 


29 Jun 


1951 



REBECCA RICHARDSON 

DIANA RICHARDSON 
ROBERT NORMAN DIXON 
Genniel Larsen 

STEVEN LEWIS DDCON 

DENISE DIXON 

NORMAN PAUL 



15 Nov 
19 Jul 
15 May 
9 Dec 
21 Jun 
18 Aug 
27 Feb 



953 

955 

958 

959 

961 

962 

1964 

967 

969 

930 

931 

952 

956 

965 



Death 
4 May 1884 
17 Apr 1926 
1 Sep I960 
3 May 1955 



294 



HENRY A. DIXON FAMILY - ROSTER 





As of December 31 


, 1969 








ID No. 




Birth 


Death 


HENRY 


ALDOUS DIXON 


14 Mar 


1835 


4 May 


1884 


Sarah DeGrey 


27 Jan 


1845 


17 Apr 


1926 


16. 


ARNOLD DIXON 


30 May 


1884 


1 Sep 


I960 




Letitia May Banks 


1 5 May 


1891 


3 May 


1955 


16. 9 


DOUGLAS WAYNE DIXON 


5 May 


1932 








Helen Konopelski 


17 Jul 


1935 






16. 91 


MICHELE DIXON 


21 Sep 


1961 






16. 10 


DORIS ANN DIXON 


19 Mar 


1934 








Bruce J. Christensen 


21 Sep 


1929 






16. 10. 1 


LESA ANN CHRISTENSEN 


17 Feb 


1958 






16. 10. 2 


KYLE DE GREY CHRISTENSEN 15 Jul 


1959 






16. 10. 3 


JENNIFER CHRISTENSEN 


19 Jan 


1961 






16.10.4 


MATTHEW BRUCE CHRIST- 












ENSEN 


25 Dec. 


1963 






16. 10. 5 


JASON DIXON CHRISTENSEN 


3 Sep 


1969 







NAMES ADDED AFTER ROSTER WAS COMPLETED: 



16. 92 


KAREN JOAN DIXON 


22 Jul 


I960 


16. 93 


TODD DE GREY DIXON 


29 Apr 


1964 


751 W 


Pat Nicholes 


27 Sep 


1940 


751 1 


BOBBI JOAN BJORKLUND 


22 Aug 


1967 


7512 


DEBBIE BJORKLUND 


4 Dec 


1962 


7513 


CINDY BJORKLUND 


25 Sep 


I960 


7522 


THOMAS CRAIG MEYERS 


16 Dec 


1966 


7534 


ROBERTA ANN NICHOLES 


28 Jan 


1967 


754 h 


Manuel H. Machado 


24 Dec 


1945 


7541 


RODNEY WAYNE MACHADO 


10 Jun 


1967 


7542 


KIMBERLY ANN MACHADO 


12 Oct 


1969 


755 w 


Diane Bjorklund 


8 Nov 


1947 


7551 


DEENA BJORKLUND 


29 Oct 


1967 


14. 624 


DAVID WARREN PETERSON 


1 Sep 


1968 


13.111 h 


Eldon Ray Morgan 


11 Jan 


1944 


13.1111 


TERRI LYN MORGAN 


28 Oct 


1966 


13. 1112 


ELDON RAY MORGAN, Jr. 


13 Dec 


1967 



295 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



A 

AIKELE 

Bonnie Ann (Cornish) 

Erik Allen 

Hyrum 

Hyrum D 

Irene Svenssen 

Mary Dixon 

Shaunty Maja 

William Eugene 
ANDERSON 

Brian S . 

Carol Le slie 

Caroline 

Catherine 

Clair S. 

Clyde S. 

Colleen 

Craig S. 

Dean A. 

Janae 

Jed Taylor 
Julia Taylor 
Kennen 
Kenneth Ray 
Kristine 
Lynette 

Michael Albert 

Raymond G. 

Sarah Summerhays 

Scott Taylor 

Vera Dixon 
ANDREWS 

Alice Delenna Dixon 

Charlene 

Dixie Lee 

Joseph Dixon 

Robert Bruce 

Robert Dale 
ARMSTRONG 

Anthon G . 

Mary Doris 

Nancy Shear smith 

McConachie 



. D. No. 


A TTP HP TTVT 

AUSTIN 




I. D. No. 


nil 

743 


Michael Reed 




1 3 . 433 


7421 


Richard M 




13.43 h 


74 h 


Richard Scott 




1 3 . 4 34 


741 


Sandra Kay 




13. 432 


742 w 


Shauna Bee 




13. 431 


74 


Sherrie Lillie 


Dixon 


13. 43 


7422 








742 




B 





BALLIF 



14 414 


Barbara (Olson) (Wade) 


12.42 




11 A 1 


Dc Llxy J c ail 


1 7 431 




14 419 


Ri'i'in C! ^ 4--f- 
LJ I lcLi.1 u LU L L 


1 ? 43? 




14 4 1 R 


Di y tc u lAUii 


1 ? 434 




14 41^ 


Tl d r~» "V A T"i y\ 


1 9 4 




14 41 A 


ilfQIlcl LJ lXUn 


1 ? 4 




14 A 1 z> 


Jan 


1 ? 417 




14 41? 


xv ci y xxiiuc j. o uij. 


1 7 41 


W 


11 A V« 
i i . o n 


lviarK 


1 ? A} 7 




14 417 


Tv A o vlr "P^ 1 YAfl 
lvldl JS. L/JLAU11 


1 7 41 




O 3 1 4 


Mark Squire 


1 O . 4 


n 


A 1 1 


Michael 






6 313 


bcott 


TO A 1 

1 2. 43 






She r ma Craven 


1Z, 43 


w 


O 3 1 1 


BARRET 1 






1 A /til 

14. 411 


Anna Dixon 


13.0 




1 1 . 62 


Carol Roundy 


13.61 


w 


14. 41 h 


Jackie Kim 


13. 611 




14. 41 


John Byron 


13. 6 


h 


6312 


Kandie Lee 


13. 615 




11.6 


Kristine 


13. 613 






Lewis Kevin 


13. 612 




10. 4 


Linda Dee Urvina 


I 3. 62 


w 


10. 41 


Michael Wayne 


13. 62 




10. 43 


Shirl Jach 


13.61 




10. 44 


Verda Kay Lynn 


13. 614 




10. 4 h 


BIGELOW 






10. 42 


Amber 


8225 






Brent Rex 


8221 




52 h 


Cindy 


8224 




521 


Elaine (Nicol) 


8222 






Glen 


8223 




52 


Lois Amber Ford 


822 





298 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 





1. D. 


No. 




I.D. N 


BIGELOW 






BOSHARD 




Rex 


822 


h 


Arnold 


81 


BJORKLUND 






Arnold Bliss 


812 


Barbara Gail (Meyers) 


752 




Arnold Von Hollen 


8113 


Erling T. 


75 


h 


Beverly Ann 


8112 


Gloria Faye 


753 




Dean Dixon 


811 


Harriett Faye 


75 




Erma Mae Dixon 


81 


Janet Marie 


754 




Cary Bliss 


8121 


-f-\ • I t t~™» 1 • 

Richard Erling 


755 




Gina 


8123 


Robert Gary 


75 1 




Glenna Rae Edwards 


812 


BOOTH 






Norma Heatherly 


811 


AIT— J TIT 

Albert W. 


72 


h 


Norman Dean 


8111 


Catherine 


721 2 




Steven Allan 


8122 


Cynthia 


7214 




BOWLES 




Gary Lynn 


722 




Brent 


10. 62 


Gordon David 


721 1 




Robert John 


10. 621 


Gordon Dixon 


721 




Suzett Schugh 


10. 62 


Gregory 


7222 








June Phoebe Erskine 


721 


w 


C 




Sherry Ann Gaudio 


722 


w 


CANNON 




Stephen M. 


7213 




Kristen Dixon 


2153 


Vesta Dixon 


72 




Lucile Dixon 


2151 


Warren Lynn 


7221 




Mark Dixon 


2152 


BOREN 






Mark W. 


215 


David 


8511 




Ruth Dixon 


215 


Elisabeth 


8513 




CHID ESTER 




Marjorie Jean Dixon 


851 




Brook (F) 


8712 


Michael 


8512 




Jo Ann Fallentine 


871 


Robert Reed 


851 


h 


Lynn U. 


87 


BOVINGDON 






Scott 


8711 


Diane Dangerfield 


441 




CHILDS 




Jame s 


441 


h 


Ann (Daybell) 


14. 51 


Jame s 


441 1 




Jason Myron 


14. 531 


Lynne 


4413 




John Myron 


14. 53 


Michael 


4412. 




Judith (Lucia) 


14. 52 


BROCKBANK 






Kristme 


14.55 


Allen Brent 


624 


h 


Maurine Dixon 


14. 5 


Allen Brent, Jr. 


6241 




Myron DeVere 


14. 5 


Anne 


6242 




Richard Dixon 


14. 54 


Kathryn Dee Taylor 


624 




Steven LeRoy 


14. 56 


Lynn (F) 


6243 




Susan Parker 


14. 53 



w 
w 



w 



299 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



C 

CHRIST ENSEN 

Bruce J. 

Doris Ann Dixon 

Jason Dixon 

Jennifer 

Kyle DeGrey 

Lesa Ann 

Ma the w Bruce 
CLEGG 

Barbara Dixon 

Brent D. 

Jack Alvin 

Michael S . 
COWLEY 

Angus Wayne 

Janeene Cheryl Tueller 

Norma Jean Hadley 

Ruby Dixon 

Shirl Curtis 

Wayne Dixon 

Wendy 
CORNISH 

Ashlie Melissa 

Bonnie Ann Aikele 

Clayton J. , Jr. 

Rebecca Lynn 
CROWLEY 

Kathryn Dixon 

Thomas Edward 

Trent 

D 

DAINES 
Anne 

Barbara Ann (Markham) 
John 
Richard 
Rus sell 
Weldon 
DANGERFIELD 
Afton 

Alice Dixon 



I. D. No. I. D. No. 
' DANGERFIELD 

16.10 h Caroline 442 

16.10 Clifford D 45 

16.10.5 Donna May 47 

16.10.3 Florence John 44 w 
16.10.2 Grace (Harding) 46 
16.10.1 Harold D. 44 

16.10.4 Diane 441 
Helen Morrison 42 w 

233 Jabez Aldous 41 

2332 Jabez W. 4 h 

233 h Kay 421 

2331 Karren 422 

Royden 42 

102 h J. William 451 
10.22 w DAVIS 

10.21 w Amy Ellen 7324 
10.2 Becki 7322 

10.22 Glen Harold 7323 
10.21 Harold Keith 732 h 
10,211 Micki 7321 

Shirley Mae Dixon 732 
7432 DAYBELL 

743 Ann Childs 14. 51 

743 h Grant Lanny 14.51 h 

7431 Jesse Glen 14. 512 

Keith Grant 14.511 
861 DE GRAW 

861 h Derk Taylor 6222 

8611 Gregory Taylor 6223 

Janice Taylor 622 

Michele 6221 

Monte 622 h 

2532 Nocole 6224 
25 3 DENISON 

2534 Byron Lesley 13. 5 h 

2531 Elaine Joice (Laws) 13.52 

2533 Inez 13.5 
25 3 h Inez Berniece 13.51 

DENSLEY 

43 Colleen 12.211 

4 Steven T. 12. 211 h 



300 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



D 

I. D. No 

DDCON 

Adryne Hodson 84 w 

Afton (Wagstaff) 13.2 

Albert Frederick 11. 

Alberta Mae 763 w 
Alice Delenna (Andrews) 10.4 
Alice Smith(Dangerfield) 4 

Alan-Romney Dixon 12. 33 

Allie (Gardner) 14. 3 

Amy Lave rn 12.5 

Amy Lynne 1 1 . 95 

Andree 85 21 

Anna 13.6 

Arnold 16. 

Arthur DeGrey 3 

Arthur Smoot 14.7 

Baby 11.8 

^Barbara (Clegg) 233 

Bert Lester 13.7 

Brenda 12.231 

Brent 16.33 

Bret Glen 7314 

Bruce Royden 16.5 

Camille 16.111 

Carl Vern 13. 133 

Carl William 13.13 

Carleen May D. 242 w 

Carol Collard 11.9 w 

Catherine Bradford 2431 
Catherine Kezia Morgan 3 w 

Cecile Clark 11.1 w 

Cecile Marjorie 11.11 

Charles Owen 10. 

Cherrie Pyper 735 w 

Christopher Dyer 2421 

Cindy Marlene 7312 

Clifton R. 11.3 

Colleen Callister 1 6 . 5 w 
Constance L. (Karwowski) 761 

Cynthia Sue 12.222 

Dana John 16.61 

Dan Petersen 12.233 

Dale Lee 2351 

* Barbara Maureen 2352 



I.D. No. 

DIXON 



David 


12. 24 




David Callister 


16. 53 




David Harry 


11. 94 




David Robert 


216 




De anna 


862 




Deanne Petersen 


12. 23 


w 


Debbie 


12. 321 




Deborah 


11. 93 




DeGrey 


235 




Denise 


1682 




Dennis Dastrup 


16. 43 




Diana Lynn 


13.131 




Diane 


12. 31 




Diane 


2412 




Diane Scott 


12. 32 


w 


Dona Penrod 


853 


w 


Donald Maiben 


12. 3 




Donald Romney 


12. 32 




Dorothy (Harrison) 


212 




Doris Ann (Christensen) 


16. 10 




Dorsey 


864 




Douglas Wayne 


16. 9 




Edith Alice 


87 




Eldon Arnold 


16.4 




Eldon Reed 


16. 41 




Electa LaPrele Smoot 


14. 


w 


Elmo Arthur 


11.4 




Edna (Ballif) 


12. 4 




Elva Ellen Schemensky 


73 


w 


Elva Jean (Elliott) 


733 




Emily Ann 


11. 96 




Erma Mae (Boshard) 


81 




Erma Murdock 


24 


w 


Ernest Arnold 


83 




Ernest DeGrey 


8 




Eugene Pari 


13. 3 




Eva Ruthie Mildenhall 


31 


w 


Eva Ruth Ward 


85 


w 


Evelyn Rose 


763 


w 


Evelyn (Smith) 


16. 2 




Dixie Beth 


236 





301 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



DIXON 
Florence Janeczko 
Florence Rosella Marks 
Floyd Preston 
Fred Chipman 
Fred Walter 
Fulvia Call 
Gary Ronald 
Genniel Larsen 
George S. 
Gerald Ernest 
Gina 

Gladys ( Nelson) 
Glen Hands 
Gloria Ann Evans 
Gloria May 
Grant 

Grant DeGrey 
Gregory Marks 
Harriett Amelia (West) 
Harriett Faye 
Harriet Hands 
Harry Albert 
Helen (Payne) 
Helen An de lino 
Helen Chipman 
Helen Konopelski 
HENRY ALDOUS 
Henry Aldous II 
Henry Alfred 
Howard Allen 
Howard Banks 
Ina Mae Woolsey 
Inez (Denison) 
James R. 
James Eugene 
Janet (Rees) 
Jean 
Jeannine 
Jerald Lamar 
Joan 

John Aldous 



I.D.No. I. D. No. 

DDCON 



10.5 


w 


John DeGrey 


2 




16. 3 


w 


.T oh n i 1 1 i a m 

k/ Willi TV 11X1 CX 111 


22 




16. 6 




.Tosp nh WA 


242 




1 2 22 




Tunv 


1 3 74 

X ~J . I i 




12.2 




.Tudv Gavle W^ood 

\j vivi y < cx y i w v v vi 


762 


W 


16 1 

■1 \J . -L 


TT7 

W 


Till i p Antif* 

U 111 1 I liiilL' 


1 2 224 

X Ld • t- u i 




R A ^ 




J LU.lt: \ A U UIIloUIl j 


9 1 
COL 




1 A R 

ID, O 


w 


X\arcn ila y IiiCJXXCl 


1 A 11 

ID, 11 


w 


7A 




xvaren Lee iviar rioti 


R£ 9 


w 


OD J 




i\.aren ivic^/ienan 


7 "^A 


w 


R 9 9 
o L L 




£\arma jeppson 


9 1 A 


w 


1 A R 




xva tn ryn 


R Al 








xs.a y 


9 1 A9 




1 3 1 


w 


K"<an tip +V» Pall 


1 A 1 A 
1 O . 1 *± 




1 A 7 
J. O . f 






in 9 

1U. Jt 




27 




X 1 o L XIX 


1 A S4 




1 A "3 

ID. J 




X\.X XO L 1X1 <± 


1 A 191 




1 A 1 
ID. jl 




L/arry uean 


1 A A9 




I 9 . 




x_/a. r ry wwen 


in ^ i 




7^ 




Lean j_/iman ^r oru) 


R 9 






t 

w 


Lee Andrew 


7 A "2 1 
IDJl 




1 1 1 




e Ann 


1 19 1 




1 4 A 




xv ij y 


1 4 




1 "3 7 


w 


jjcivoy Dmooi 


1 A 1 
1 ^ . 1 




19 9 


w 


Le slie 


11"? 
J 1 C 




1 A Q 


w 


1 ;C: L 1 L let IVlcL y J— J dlllv o 


1 A 


W 






ijc ILlc V lldLC XvUj-Illlc y 


19 ^ 


w 


21 

tw X 




T , inHa 


? 37 




1 

X 






R41 

O ~ x 




16 12 




T ,inH a Ka v 


1 1 91 




16 1 






16. 12 


W 


731 




T /i <5 a 


2143 




13.5 




T ,i sa a \r 


1 2 223 




94. 1 




LUla 


'\'\ 11 

1 J. 1 J 




li.il 




Lois Mai Dickenson 


lb. b 


w 


ID. J 




Loleta Wiscomb 


1 i . 1 


w 


232 




Lori Jean 


7313 




16. 45 




Louie Maiben 


12 


w 


16. 11 




Louise (Larkin) 


213 




16. 52 




Lucian 


26 




214 




Lucile Knowlden 


21 


w 






* Judith Louise Russ 


234 


w 






i^Kay Darlene Dix 


235 


w 



302 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DDCON 



I. D. No. 

DDCON 



Luella Madsen 


23 


w 


Luthenia Maiben 


12. 


w 


Lynn Ann 


16.51 




Margaret Anne Simpson 


13. 12 


w 


Margaret Electa 


14. 23 




Maria Louise (Taylor) 


6 




Marjorie Jean (Boren) 


851 




Mark Eyring 


2411 




Martha Bernard 


133 


w 


Mary 


74 




Mary Ann (Olson) 


13. 42 




Mary Ann Painter 


8 


w 


MARY ANN SMITH 


Wife 




Mary Ellen 


842 




Mary Etola Dangerfield 


13 


w 


Mary Jane Chattin 


13.41 


w 


Mary Jane South 


14. 2 


w 


Mary Lou (Taylor) 


12. 21 




Mary Matilda Hills 


13.4 


w 


Maud (Markham) 


25 




Maurine (Childs) 


14. 5 




Maurine Welker 


23 


w 


Max Glen 


731 




May Banks 


16. 


w 


^ Melvin R. 


11.9 




Merrill Verl 


843 




G.' Michael 


243 




Michael 


12. 232 


Michael DeGrey 
Michael Layne 


16. 32 




313 




Michael Romney 


2432 




Michelle 


16. 91 




Michelle 


12. 323 


Michelle Jo 


12. 221 


Mildred (Tangren) 


11.2 




Nicole Noelle 


2422 




Norma (Jess) 


li . 5 




Norman Paul 


16.83 




Ora Anderson 


14. 2 


w 


Owen George 


10. 5 




Parley Smith 


13. 




*Megan 


236 2 




: *Michael Kent 


2353 





I.D. No. 

ON 



Patricia 


13. 71 




Patricia Donahue 


12. 22 


w 


Patricia Stewart 


12. 24 


w 


Paul Raymond 


16. 61 




Paul Smoot 


14. 2 




Paul Smoot, Jr. 


14. 21 




Pauline 


13. 122 




Peter M. 


244 




Phyllis (Shaw) 


211 




Ralph 


85 




Ralph Stanley 


852 




Raymond Lane 


31 




Reed D. 


13. 4 




Reed Garthe 


13. 41 




Rhea (Reeve) 


12. 1 




Richard 


12. 23 




Richard S. 


735 




Robert George 


762 




Robert Norman 


16. 8 




Robert Smith 


9 




Robert Timothy 


13. 73 




Rodger Duane 


16. 44 




Ronald 


86 




Ronald Ward 


854 




Ruby (Cowley) 


10. 2 




Rulon Sterling 


24 




Ruth 


11.7 




Ruth (Cannon) 


21. 5 




Sandra Lee 


856 




Sarah Ann Lewis 


2 


w 


Sarah Ann (McConachie) 


5 




SARAH DE GREY 


Wife 




Sarah Jean Dastrup 


16. 4 


w 


Sarah Vera (Summerhays 


) 14. 4 




Scott 


12. 322 




Sena Rasmus sen 


11. 


w 


Cheri Ann 


855 




Sherrie Lillie 


13. 43 




Shirel Ferris 


763 




Shirley Mae (Davis) 


732 




She r line 


13. 124 




Ryan Patrick 


2363 




Shannon DeGrey 


2361 





303 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DDCON 



DIXON 
Stacy 

Stanley Lewis 
Stanley Lewis II 
Stella (Lewis) 
Stephanie Gwyn 
Steven John 
Steven Lewis 
Susan 
Suzane 

Suzanne Eyring 
Tere sa 
Terry Mae 
Thomas Anthony 
Thomas Ray Hardin 
Timothy Hugh 
Timothy Paul 
Todd William 
VaLera (Ririe) 
Vera (Anderson) 
Veon Collings 
Verl Grant 
Verne da Jackson 
Vernon Lee 
Vernon Lee, Jr. 
Vesta (Booth) 
Virginia (Schugk) 
Virginia Beckstead 
Virginia Poulson 
Vivian (McKay) 
Walter DeGrey 
Wayne Daniel 
William Aldous 
William Frank 
William Hands 
Yvonne Romney 

E 

ELLIOTT 
Elva Jean Dixon 
Kelle Jean 
Kenneth Lee 



I. D. No. I.D. No. 

ELLIOTT 



7315 




Keri Lee 


*"7 O O O 

7332 


dS 




Shane 


n 1 1 1 
( 33 3 


1 1 
£30 












TP 

r 




1 O . 7 3 




r Al_il_/JLilN 1 UN Hi 




d I 1 






9. 7 
o ( 


1 A 1 
10. ol 




v^aroiyn v^jt i± i strap ) 


077 

Old 


1 1 Q? 




TP r\ -i 4-Vi All rp i "v n 
XL/U.1LX1 ial itc J_/ LA. vj 11 


87 
1 


10 I TO 
1 J, 1 d-J 




joAiin ^L>niaester; 


07 1 
0(1 


d 1 ! 1 


w 




1 j 


O D -J 1 






l j 


foil 




Robert Bernard 


8(3 


13. id 




busan (r latberg) 


8(4 


"3 11 
311 




TP TO T_T XT' ID 




H 1 A 1 




iLlayne 1 aylor 


Oil 


(bid 




Or ant A. 


oil 


734Z 




Jeffry Taylor 


61 12 


1 U . 1 




Kathy 


6113 


11.6 




Terri 


611 1 


76 


w 


FLAT BERG 




O A 

84 




David R. 


874 


86 


w 


Susan Fallentine 


874 


13.1 




FORD 


823 


TO 1 Oi 

13.12 




Anginita Maria Van Derbeck / 


72 




Cynthia 


8233 


10.6 




Dale 


8232 


10. 


w 


Dixon Alton 


823 


84 


w 


Janice Ann (Neerings) 


824 


14. 




Kathleen 


8231 


1 d . 




Leah Lillian Dixon 


82 


IDjj 




Lois Amber (Bigelow) 


822 


n 
I 




Marilyn Mae (Simmons) 


821 


7 ^4. 




Mayo Alton 


82 


7 1 




.Steven Mathew 


8234 


243 


w 


FRAMPTON 








Alan Taylor 


6146 






Boyd F. 


614 






Bruce Taylor 


6143 


733 




David Taylor 


6142 


7331 




Dixie Taylor 


614 


733 


h 


Kent Taylor 


6147 



304 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I. D. N 

FRAMPTON 

Marrianne 6141 

Paul Taylor 6145 

Susan 6144 

G 

GARDNER 

Allie Dixon 14.3 

James Dixon 14. 31 

Reed Snow 14. 3 h 

GILLS TRAP 

Caroline Fallentine 872 

Christopher 8721 

Mollie 8722 

Ralph M. 872 h 

GRIGGS 

Brian Wilfred 16.211 

Karen Ann Smith 16.21 

Wilford Charles I6.21h 

H 

HARDING 

Curtis P. 46 h 

Grace Dangerfield 46 

Judy Ann (Pugh) 462 

Miriam (Waterman) 461 

HARRISON 

Angela 2127 

Dorothy Dixon 212 

Heather 2125 

Holly 2126 

Judith 2123 

Linda (Welling) 2121 

Lisbeth 2124 

Patricia 2122 

Virl L. 212 h 

I 

IPSEN 

Barbara June 14.61 

Bradley Payne. 14.613 

Janalyn 14.612 

Dana Kaye 14. 614 



I.D. No. 



IPSEN 

Robert Lee 14.61 h 

Robin Lee 14.611 

J 

JESS 

Barbara Ann 11.52 

Norma Dixon 11.5 

Richard G. 1 1. 5 h 

Richard Steven 11.51 
JOHNSON 

Jay Ladd 13. 222 

Jay Lorus 1 3. 22 h 

Jeffery Warren 13.225 

Jerry Dixon 13.223 

Lisa 13. 224 

Lori 13.221 

Norma Jean Wagstaff 13. 22 

K 

KARWOWSKI 

Constance Lee Dixon 761 

Eddie 761 h 

Scott Edward 7611 

KARTCHNER 

David Taylor 686 

Elaine 683 

Ellen 684 

Fred Dixon 68 h 

Kenneth Taylor 682 

Linda (Tyler) 681 
Marianne Allene Davis 682 w 

Mary Ann 688 

Richard Taylor 685 

Rosena Louise 687 

Ruth Elaine Taylor 68 



305 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I. D. No. 

LAN AH AN 

Amy 4423 

Caroline Dangerfield 442 

Edward 442 h 

Melissa 4422 

Susan 4421 

LARKIN 

Dixon Ferrin 2131 

E. Ferrin 213 h 

James Robert 2134 

Jane 2136 

Julia 2132 

Louise Dixon 213 

Martha Ann 2133 

William Lyle 2135 

LARSON 

Amy LaVern Dixon 12. 5 

Doyle R. 12. 5 h 

Larry O Neal 12. 51 

Michael 12.52 

LAWS 

Cindy 13.5 21 

Elaine Joyce Denison 13.52 

LaMar R. 1 3. 52 h 

Marvin 13. 522 

Terry 13.523 
LEWIS 

Frede rick Dixon 10.31 

Frede rick We sley 10.3 h 

John Stephen 10. 32 

Lynn Ann 10. 33 

Patty Stott 1 0. 31 w 

Sandra Lee 10. 34 

Stella Dixon 10.3 
LOWE 

David Jordan 12.113 

Howard D. 12. 11 h 

Kenton Alan 12. 114 

Kevin Howard 12.111 

Lynda Ann 12. 112 

Mark Douglas 12.115 

Ruth Reeve 12.11 



LUCIA 

Judith Childs 

Thomas Allen 
MARKHAM 

Barbara Ann (Daines ) 

David Paul 

Diana Louise (Stewart) 

Dixon Joseph 

Douglas 

Fred Lewis 

Jae 

James Lewis 
John Frederick 
Junece Jex 
Karl 

Kay April 
Kevin Richard 
Mary Ann 
Maud Dixon 
Michael Dixon 
Reed B. 

Reeda Bjarnson 

Robert Dixon 

Steven John 
MARSHALL 

Deanna Dixon 

Eric Steven 

Steven B. 
MC CONACHIE 

Alexander Collie 

Donald 

Nancy Shearsmith (Arms 
Sarah Ann Dixon 
Mc EWAN 
Allan Dixon 
David Vernon 
Glen Richard 
Junius Harold 
James Harold 
Lois Dixon 
Lynda 



I. D. No. 

14. 52 
14.52 h 



253 

2512 

254 

252 

2518 

25 

2516 

2514 

251 

252 

2524 

2517 

2522 

2523 

25 

2521 

2513 

251 

2515 

2511 



w 



w 



862 

8621 

862 

5 

51 

trong) 5 2 
5 



13 

13 

13 

13 

13, 

13 

13 



113 

114 

115 

11 h 

112 

11 

111 



306 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I. D. No. I. D. No. 



Mc KAY 




NELSON 






Catherine Dixon 


14. 222 


Mary Lynne Sanders 


652 


w 


Christine Dixon 


14. 223 


Michael McKay 


6511 




Rebecca Dixon 


14. 221 


NICHOLS 






Richard L. 


14.22 h 


Clayton 


753 


h 


Vivian Dixon 


14. 22 


Gloria Faye Bjorklund 
Julie 


753 
7531 




MENDENHALL 




Sherrie 


7532 




Nancy Schugk 


10. 63 


Tina 


7533 




Ronnie Lynn 


10.63 h 


NICOL 






Troy Lynn 


10.631 


Elaine Bigelow 


8222 




MEYERS 




Stephanie 


82221 




Barbara Gail Bjorklund 


75 2 


Steven Ted 


8222 


h 


Kenneth 


7521 








Tom 


752 h 


O 

OLSON 






N 




Barbara Ballif 


12. 42 




NEERINGS 




Christine 


13. 421 




Janice Ann Ford 


824 


Cory Mont 


13. 214 




Jill 


8241 


Darrel W 


13. 42 


h 


John Theodore 


824 h 


David Kenneth 


12. 421 




Lisa 


8244 


David Russell 


13. 211 




Shelia 


8243 


Denise 


13. 216 




Troy 


8242 


Denise Leona 


13. 423 




NELSON 




Donna Mae Wag staff 


13. 21 




Alice Louise Taylor 


65 


Jerald Russell 


13. 21 


h 


Arthur Taylor 


651 


Kenneth 


12. 42 


h 


Bonnie McKay 


651 w 


Kurt Dixon 


13. 215 




Carolyn 


14. 85 


Mary Ann Dixon 


13. 42 




Christina Louise (Pre ston) 


653 


Pamela 


12. 422 




Christine 


6521 


Robert Reed 


13. 422 




David Christian 


6522 


Shelly 


13.212 




David LeRoy 


14. 82 


Stephen Jeffery 


13. 424 




Diane 


14. 83 


Steven Craig 


13. 213 




G. El Roy 


65 h 








Gladys Dixon 


14. 8 


P 






Henry Aldous 


654 


PAYNE 






Ivan William 


14.8 h. 


Barbara June (Ipsen) 


14. 61 




Ivan William II 


14. 81 


Bette Lyn (Peterson) 


14. 62 




James Nicholls 


655 


E. Junius 


14. 6 


h 


J ohn Christian 


652 


Helen Dixon 


14. 6 




Julie Anne 


14. 86 








Kent Dixon 


14. 84 









307 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I.D. No. 

PETERSEN 

Bette Lyn Payne 14. 62 

Kristi Lyn 14. 621 

Lisa Ann 14. 622 

Robert Warren 14.62 h 

PRESTON 
Christina Louise Nelson 653 

Ronald W. 653 h 

Suzanna 6531 

PUGH 

Judy Ann Harding 462 

Kevin James 4622 

Lorin K 462 h 

Scott Christopher 4621 
PURVES 

Robert Byron 16. 22 

Susan Louise Smith 16. 22 

R 

REES 

David Michael 16.13 h 

Janet Dixon 16. 13 

Steven Michael 16. 131 
REEVE 

Fenton W. 12. 1 h 

Rhea 12. 1 

Ruth (Lowe) 12.11 

RICHARDS 

Bryan Taylor 6233 

Carol Lyn 6231 

H. Bryan 623 h 

Heidi 6235 

Lynn Anne Taylor 623 

Robyn 6234 

Shari 6232 

RICHARDSON 

Cynthia 16.71 

David Thomas 16.74 

Diana 16.7.10 

Don Dixon 1 6. 75 

Douglas We slie 16.72 

Glen Alan 16.76 
* Brian Robert Peterson 14.623 
** David Warren Peterson 14.624 



I. D. No. 



RICHARDSON 

Gloria May 16.7 

Marilyn 16. 73 

Patrick Arnold 16. 78 

Rebecca 16. 79 

Sandra 16.77 

Thomas We slie 16.7 h 

RIRIE 

Annette (Turner) 10.14 
Barbara War reneTemple 10.13 w 

Craig Martin 10. 13 

Dixon Farrell 10.11 

Janeal 10. 121 

Kent Hyrum 10.15 

Larraine Humphries 10. 12 w 

Martin C. 10. 1 h 

Monta Mae Norris 10. 11 w 

Paige Diane 10. 131 

Richard Owen 10. 12 

Shari 10. 113 

Shelly 10.114 

Stephen Dixon 10.111 

Susan 10. 112 

VaLera Dixon 10. 1 

ROBINSON 

George W. 231 h 

Jon Jay 2313 

Julia Ann 2312 

June Dixon 231 

Stanley Wayne 2311 

ROSE 

Christine 8412 

GaryT. 841 h 

James 8413 

Linda Dixon 841 

Robert Dixon 841 1 

S 

SCHUGK 

Dennis Charles 10.61 

Judy 10.64 

Nancy (Mendenhall) 10.63 



308 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I. D. No. 

SCHUGK 



Percy John 


10. 6 


h 


Sharon Killpatrick 


10. 61 


w 


Sonjia 


10. 65 




Suzett (Bowles) 


10. 62 




Virginia Dixon 


10.6 




SHAW 






Anita Phyllis 


2116 




Erin Jean 


2115 




John A. 


21 1 


h 


John Austin 


2111 




Kathleen 


21 13 




Phyllis Dixon 


21 1 




Robert Dixon 


2117 




Rosemary 


21 18 




Sandra 


2112 




Sylvia 


21 14 




SIMMONS 






David Edwin 


8213 




Edwin V. 


821 


h 


Lori Jean 


8212 




Marilyn Mae Ford 


821 




Timothy 


8214 




Wendy Lee 


8211 




SMITH 






Donald H. 


16. 2 


h 


Evelyn Dixon 


16. 2 




Jean Dixon 


232 




Karen Ann (Griggs) 


16. 21 




Ralph Nye 


232 


h 


Robert Nye 


2321 




Rodney 


2322 




Susan Louise (Purves) 


16. 22 




STEWART 






Beth Ann 


2541 




Brent Taylor 


6131 




Diane Louise Markham 


254 




Emily 


2542 




Gary 


254 


h 


George Keith 


613 


h 


Jan 


61 33 




Jon Taylor 


6134 





I. D. No. 



STEWART 




Kim Taylor 


6132 


Nancy Taylor 


613 


SUMMERHAYS 




Clyde Dixon 


1442 


Clyde J. 


14. 4 


Diana 


14. 43 


Michael Dixon 


14. 44 


Sandra 


14. 45 


Sarah 


14. 41 


Sarah Vera Dixon 


14. 4 


T 




TANGREN 




James Colin 


11.2 


James Dixon 


11. 23 


Mildred Dixon 


11.2 


Nancy Ann 


1 1 . 22 


Sharon Lynn 


11. 21 


TAYLOR 




Alice Louise (Nelson) 


65 


Alta Hansen 


64 


Amy 


6414 


Anthony Hansen 


642 


Arthur Dixon 


61 


Arthur Nicholls 


6 


Bradford Green 


6413 


Brigham Green 


6417 


Catherine Pearson 


621 


Celestia Johnson 


62 


Clarence Dixon 


66 


Colette Green 


641 


Colleen (Densley) 


12. 21 1 


David Arthur 


644 


David Hoen 


6325 


Deanna Hoen 


632 


Diane 


6331 


Dixie (Frampton) 


614 


Douglas Dixon 


12. 212 


Elayne (Fisher) 


611 


Elton LeRoy 


63 


Ethel Scott 


63 



309 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



TAYLOR 
Ethelyn Peterson 
Floyd R. 
George Green 
George Terry 
Henry Dixon 
Henry Dixon, Jr. 
Henry Dixon III 
James Hoen 
James Scott 
Janice (DeGraw) 
John Arthur 
John Arthur, Jr. 
John Tanner 
Julia (Anderson) 
Julie 

Julie Ann 

Kathryn Dee (Brockbank) 
Kathy 

Kent Goodridge 
Lisa Jeanne 
Lorna Bird 
Louise (Woodruff) 
Lynn Anne (Richards) 
Lynn Dixon 
Mary Lou Dixon 
Maurine Goodridge 
Me gan 

Nancy (Stewart) 
Nancy Lee Tanner 
Nicole 

Orson Kenneth 

Paul Scott 

Richard Floyd 

Ruth Elaine (Kartchner) 

Scott Hoen 

Stephen Kroge 

Terri 

Thomas Green 
Thomas 
Wayne Tanner 



I. D. No. I.D. No. 

1 TEMPEST 

67 w Daniel Dixon 12. 313 

12.21 h Diane Dixon 12.31 

6415 John Henry III 12.31 h 
625 Stephen Dixon 12.312 
64 Terri Lynn 12. 31 1 
641 William Henry 12.314 

6411 TURNER 

6321 Annette Ririe 10. 14 

632 Reed Martin 10. 142 

622 Robert Morris 10. 141 
621 Ronald Morris 10.14 h 

6211 Ryan Michael 10.143 
6333 TYLER 

631 Linda Kartchner 681 

6326 Michael 6811 

12.214 Steven R. 681 h 
624 

6324 W 

6 1 2 WADE 

12.215 Blaine 12.42 h 
643 w Barbara Ballif 12.42 
634 WAGSTAFF 

623 Afton Dixon 13.2 
62 Cindy Rae 13.231 
12.21 Dermont W. 13.2 h 
61 w Donna Mae (Olson) 13.21 
6418 Gary Mont 13.23 

613 Jolene Robb 13.23 w 

633 w Kathleen (Yorgason) 13. 24 

6416 Norma Jean (Johnson) 13. 22 

67 WATERMAN 

633 David Glen 4611 

12.213 Glen 461 h 

68 Michael Curtis 4612 

6322 Miriam Harding 461 
643 WELLING 

6323 David Michael 2121 h 

6412 Linda L. Harrison 2121 

6212 WEST 

6332 Audrey Lorraine 15.11 



310 



INDEX TO DESCENDANTS OF H. A. DIXON 



I.D. No. 

WEST 



Denise Irene 


15.121 


Donald Lynn 


15.12 


Donald Lynn, Jr. 


15. 122 


George Washington 


15. h 


Harriett Amelia Dixon 


15. 


Jackie Jean Ricks 


15.12 w 


Lynn Dixon 


15. 1 


Mable May Hansen 


15.1 w 


WOODRUFF 




Barry Clifford 


6343 


Becky 


6342 


Clifford A. 


634 h 


Louise Taylor 


634 


Russell Elton 


6344 


Shelly K. 


6341 


YORGASON 




Blaine M. 


13. 24 h 


Kathleen Wagstaff 


13. 24 


Steven 


13. 242 


Tamara Lynn 


13. 241 



311 



CHILDREN OF HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 

I.D. No. PAGE 

1 HENRY ALFRED DIXON 269 

2 JOHN DE GREY DIXON 269 

3 ARTHUR DE GREY DIXON 272 

4 ALICE SMITH DLXON DANGER FIELD 273 

5 SARAH ANN DIXON MC CONACHIE 273 

6 MARIA LOUISE DIXON TAYLOR 274 

7 WILLIAM ALDOUS DIXON 278 

8 ERNEST DE GREY DIXON 280 

9 ROBERT SMITH DIXON 285 

10 CHARLES OWEN DIXON 283 

11 ALBERT FREDERICK DIXON 285 

12 WALTER DE GREY DIXON 286 

13 PARLEY SMITH DIXON 288 

14 LE ROY DIXON 291 

15 HARRIET AMELIA DIXON WEST 293 

16 ARNOLD DIXON 293 



312 



BRIWAMYOUMOWWERSJTY 



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